Application Details

Reference 20/00433/F
Address The Hawthorns Woodland Road Bristol BS8 1UQ  
Street View
Proposal Demolition of existing structures and redevelopment of the site to accommodate a new University of Bristol Library to include archive and collections space, a cultural collections centre, research facility, working and study spaces, exhibition and events spaces and cafe. The creation of an enhanced public realm within the surrounding area between Woodland Road junction with Tyndall Avenue, Elton Road and St Michael's Park; with associated works (Major Application).
Validated 30-01-20
Type Full Planning
Status Decided
Neighbour Consultation Expiry 26-08-20
Standard Consultation Expiry 31-08-20
Determination Deadline 30-04-20
Decision GRANTED subject to condition(s)
Decision Issued 06-10-21
BCC Planning Portal BCC Planning Portal
Public Comments Supporters: 148 Objectors: 219  Unstated: 14  Total: 381
No. of Page Views 0
Comment analysis   Date of Submission
Nearby Trees Within 200m

BTF response:

Public Comments

on 2021-03-16   SUPPORT

A much needed addition to Bristol City. I fully support this application. Its about time wesaw some high quality and beautiful new build projects in Bristol. This will be a great catalyst forchanging peoples perceptions of the city, and raising the bar in terms of design quality.

on 2021-03-06   OBJECT

I would like to object to the plans for development of the Hawthorns.Firstly the size and modern look that is planned is going to be completely out of place anddominate what is a beautiful architectural area..

I am a parent of children in the infant school at Bristol Grammar School and I am extremelyconcerned about the lack of emphasis on the safety and well being of the children of BristolGrammar School. During the consultation evening there was huge bias in the attention to thesafety of the children of Bristol Grammar School on the basis of it being a 'private' school of largecatchment where parents choose to send their children. I question whether this is of importance.The safety of any child is of great significance irrespective of whether their education is viafees/scholarship/paid for by the state. This is a hugely bias vote and should not be considered. It'sworrying to think that members of the council would be bias in this way.

As a doctor I am aware that the site lies next to a cluster of NHS hospitals that provide regionalcare to the entire South West of England and thus transport links and levels of traffic are high inview of the numbers of staff and patients visiting the sites. This area is next to a newly designated'clean emissions zone' this confirms that there is already a huge issue with congestion in this area.Having new routes and no left and right turns plus a level of the development open to the peopleof Bristol, will only exacerbate an already busy transport system.Relying on the clean air zone to reduce traffic in this area is flawed on the basis of need for staffand patients of the hospitals and parents who will always need private car transport to carry out

multiple school pick up and drop offs of children at Bristol Grammar School each day. BristolGrammar School is a school with a huge catchment area and this will not change. The plans willleave parents struggling to park and difficulties getting to and from the school.The effect of Bristol Grammar School on local traffic was confirmed in the meeting as the 'heaviesttraffic time' during the traffic survey corresponded completely with the school morning runs.

Thank you for taking the time to consider my objection, I would appreciate more consideration ofthe fact that this development is next to a huge school full of children- I don't feel that this pointhas been looking into in enough detail. The fact that it is a private school is irrelevant.

Best wishes

Dr Kathryn Avery

on 2021-03-05   OBJECT

I would like to object to the plans for development of the Hawthorns. As a graduate ofBristol University I agree that it requires a better library facility than it has however, this site is notthe location for such a big development.It is out of character with the surrounding architecture and will dominate its surroundings locally,dwarfing the beautiful old villas that this area of Bristol is known for. The juxtaposition between oldand new can often be done sympathetically to both types of architecture, but in this case, it willovershadow all other local architecture of historic value.Bristol Grammar School: I am also parent of children in the junior school and i am hugelyconcerned about the lack of emphasis on the safety and well being of the children of BristolGrammar School. During the consultation evening there was huge bias in the attention to thesafety of the children of Bristol Grammar School on the basis of it being a private school of largecatchment where parents choose to send their children. I question whether this is of importance.The safety of any child is of great importance irrespective of whether their education is viafees/scholarship/paid for by the state. This is a hugely bias vote and should not be considered. It'sworrying to think that members of the council would be bias in this way.The school has architectural heritage in the form of The Great Hall which, even at its significantsize will be dwarfed by the development. This is also where children will sit the biggest exams oftheir lives with building work ongoing adjacent.Transport: The site lies next to a cluster of NHS hospitals that provide regional care to the entireSouth West of England and thus transport links and levels of traffic are high in view of thenumbers of staff and patients visiting the sites. This area is next to a newly designated 'clean

emissions zone' this confirms that there is already a huge issue with congestion in this area.Having new routes and no left and right turns plus a level of the development open to the peopleof Bristol, will only exacerbate an already busy transport system.Relying on the clean air zone to reduce traffic in this area is flawed on the basis of need for staffand patients of the hospitals and parents who will always need private car transport to carry outmultiple school pick up and drop offs of children at Bristol Grammar School each day. BristolGrammar School is a school with a huge catchment area and this will not change. The plans willleave parents struggling to park and difficulties getting to and from the school.The effect of Bristol Grammar School on local traffic was confirmed in the meeting as the 'heaviesttraffic time' during the traffic survey corresponded completely with the school morning runs. Ialready have multiple photographs of 'near misses' involving young infant school pupils and thebuses on Elton Road.I strongly object to the development on the grounds of its impact on its local environment,transport and safety of young children and staff at Bristol Grammar School.Thank you for taking the time to consider my objections.

on 2021-03-02   SUPPORT

I'm in favour of this library. A University needs aspirational buildings, and I think theangular structure gives it that kind of presence. It's large and it stands out, but there are a numberof large buildings nearby that it belongs with. The risk is that a revised application will have toremove the interesting angular parts, and the public access, in order to make it smaller. Whatremains would be the worst of both worlds: A big bland box.

on 2021-03-02   OBJECT

I have two young children (aged 4 and 7) attending infant school at Bristol GrammarSchool.I am concerned about the size and impact of the development on the school environment. Thebuilding is considerably bigger that the building that is currently there and will impact the schoolbuilding adjacent to it. I am also extremely concerned about the additional traffic(motorized/bicycle and footfall) that will be pushed down Elton Road which to all intents andpurposes is a single lane one way street with narrow pavements.I believe that the proposed revised road layout (with the permanent closure of Woodlands Road)will cause actual harm (through lower air quality) as well as greatly increased potential for harm tothe children during their daily business at school. Whilst we accept that choosing to live and schoolour children in Bristol comes with an accepted risk of lower air quality, we do not think that isreasonable for the council to increase this actual harm knowingly and willingly to the children atschool by approving this proposal as it currently stands. The potential harm I refer to relates asubstantially busier Elton Road. The infants school classrooms are on the "houses" side of EltonRoad with half of their playground in the front garden of two of the houses, directly on Elton Road.Many of their daily activities including assemblies and lunch take place on the main site so theycross this road many times a day.Finally, on the topic of this area needing regeneration, it is worth considering what motivation theUniversity will have had over the last several years to maintain the appearance of these buildingsif regeneration was to be a positive push in a future planning application. It is notable that the roadresurfacing works that have taken place during lock down have ameliorated the overall

appearance of that area of Woodlands Road.

Thank you for taking my view into consideration,Dr Sara C Tullberg

on 2021-03-01   OBJECT

I have two young children (aged 4 and 7) attending infant school at Bristol Grammar School.

I am concerned about the size and impact of the development on the school environment. The building is considerably bigger that the building that is currently there and will impact the school building adjacent to it. I am also extremely concerned about the additional traffic (motorized/bicycle and footfall) that will be pushed down Elton Road which to all intents and purposes is a single lane one way street with narrow pavements.

I believe that the proposed revised road layout (with the permanent closure of Woodlands Road) will cause actual harm (through lower air quality) as well as greatly increased potential for harm to the children during their daily business at school. Whilst we accept that choosing to live and school our children in Bristol comes with an accepted risk of lower air quality, we do not think that is reasonable for the council to increase this actual harm knowingly and willingly to the children at school by approving this proposal as it currently stands. The potential harm I refer to relates a substantially busier Elton Road. The infants school classrooms are on the "houses" side of Elton Road with half of their playground in the front garden of two of the houses, directly on Elton Road. Many of their daily activities including assemblies and lunch take place on the main site so they cross this road many times a day.

Finally, on the topic of this area needing regeneration, it is worth considering what motivation the University will have had over the last several years to maintain the appearance of these buildings if regeneration was to be a positive push in a future planning application. It is notable that the road resurfacing works that have taken place during lock down have ameliorated the overall appearance of that area of Woodlands Road.

Thank you for taking my view into consideration,Dr Sara C Tullberg

on 2021-02-26   OBJECT

This new development is huge monolith to be placed in beautiful leafy area with oldhistorical buildings. It overshadows everything around, the size and visually un pleasing shape andsize are very unfortunate selection for such a beautiful area. It would damage these nice andhistorical roads quite significantly!Secondly, talking about private school and parents should choose school closer to their home isjust show that the individuals don't know what they are talking about. Bristol grammar school isgrammar school for gifted children, not all the rich children. some parents have two jobs so theycan pay for their child education as Somerset doesn't have council grammar school. if there isone, they would choose that. So to say that they do not need to commute by car into this area isignorant and irresponsible. Common states school doesn't have resources to develop these verygifted children.And last, to talk how safe it is for people when cars are not going to be used around but same timeto push all traffic through the only one road next to infant and juniors school is just awful. Adultshave to be protected but small kids are ignored, this new proposed change in road arrangementswill cause incredibly congested traffic in mornings and afternoons and will be huge safety risk tothe children!As well as all the pollution will end up around these little people!I object to the development, it is absolutely megalomaniac structure and the size is not justified byneeds. Most of the students can study online and they are no homeless people, they have theiraccommodations where they can study in their rooms.

on 2020-10-08  

The Christmas Steps Arts Quarter (Residents &Traders) makes further comment asfollows:

STRENGTH OF OPPOSITION Already we have strongly objected to this Library scheme on manygrounds. Now, in early October 2020, we note that a massive 240 other objections have beensubmitted. These include strong opposition from many respected bodies such as Historic England,Bristol Civic Society, Conservation Advisory Panel, Bristol Grammar School, Clifton & HotwellsImprovement Society, Victorian Society, Pagasus Group, Highbury Villas Residents' Association,IMA Transport Planning and others. In the face of this very weighty and serious mass of objection,this Association fails to see how Bristol City Council can possibly give consent to this planningapplication.

THE APPLICATION'S RENEWED PROPOSAL TO BAN WEST>EAST TRAFFIC THROUGHTYNDALL AVENUE From September 2020, Bristol City Council banned all vehicles from turningleft from Perry Road into St. Michael's Hill. A combination of the that new ban and thisapplication's proposed closure of the middle stretch of Woodland Road and proposed ban throughTyndall Avenue would disastrously block off all access from our area into St. Michael's Hill. Ourcommunity considers that it is absolutely essential for all of us and our visitors to have vehicularaccess from our CSAQ area into St. Michael's Hill. First and foremost, pregnant mothers need tobe rushed to the Maternity Hospital, and heart or cancer victims need to be rushed to Bristol HeartFoundation or to the Oncology Department respectively, a percentage being by private car. Also,

there must be a way of general motorists being able to filter away to the North and East via St.Michael's Hill. Therefore,. whatever the planning outcome of the Library application as a whole,this Association strongly objects to Tyndall Avenue becoming one-way. It is absolutely essentialthat it must remain two-way.

on 2020-10-08  

THE APPLICATION’S RENEWED PROPOSAL TO BAN WEST>EAST TRAFFIC

THROUGH TYNDALL AVENUE From September 2020, Bristol City Council

banned all vehicles from turning left from Perry Road into St. Michael’s Hill. A

combination of the that new ban and this application’s proposed closure of the

middle stretch of Woodland Road and proposed ban through Tyndall Avenue

would disastrously block off all access from our area into St. Michael’s Hill.

Our community considers that it is absolutely essential for all of us and our

visitors to have vehicular access from our CSAQ area into St. Michael’s Hill. First

and foremost, pregnant mothers need to be rushed to the Maternity Hospital,

and heart or cancer victims need to be rushed to Bristol Heart Foundation or to

the Oncology Department respectively, a percentage being by private car.

Also, there must be a way of general motorists being able to filter away to the

North and East via St. Michael’s Hill.

Therefore, whatever the planning outcome of the Library application as a

whole, this Association strongly objects to Tyndall Avenue becoming one-

way. It is absolutely vital that it should remain two-way for the public.

Best regards,

Hamilton Caswell

Planning Scrutiny Committee,

Christmas Steps Arts Quarter (Residents & Traders)

on 2020-09-28   OBJECT

This massive white construction itotally dwarfs the surrounding period buildings and isout of place. It's representation reminds me of pictures of Venice with an umpteen story cruiseship as its backdrop. Internally it looks like a vast empty space for socialising.and drinking coffee.It is listed as a library but in these days of the internet there is no need of big libraries. TheUniversity already has one that meets its needs and most departments have their own for study. Ibelieve this is a vanity project for the architects and an attempt by the University to create acampus. This would severely restrict the movement of the general public around Clifton and toBGS Grammar School.

on 2020-09-28   OBJECT

___________________________________________________________________________ Traffic and Travel Survey Summary TN01_v2-2 September 2020 2 IMA-19-043

2 Background

2.1 IMA Transport Planning has been commissioned by Bristol Grammar School (BGS) to advise on transport and highways matters which have day to day operational implications for the school.

2.2 The proposed redevelopment of The Hawthorns (reference 20/00433/F) is for a new library building with associated public realm proposals, which include the closure of a section of Woodland Road and the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic, with the exception of buses.

2.3 A Transport Assessment and Addendum prepared by Arup has been submitted in support of the scheme. Bristol City Council (BCC) Transport Development Control has provided consultation comments regarding the proposed development in May 2020 and August 2020.

2.4 The key transport implications of the proposed development on the day-to-day operation of the school are the closure of Woodlands Road and the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses, which will increase traffic flows on Elton Road past the school and increase pedestrian movements to and from the new Library.

2.5 This review will also consider the predicted operation of the local highway network and whether the impact of the proposals has been fully considered on the wider highway network which is already congested.

3 Review of Assumed Redistribution of Existing Traffic Flows

3.1 Within the Arup TA the redistribution of traffic flows was based on a scheme in which Woodland Road was closed but Tyndall Avenue remained open to two-way traffic and predicted traffic flows in the TA Addendum relate to the current scheme in which Tyndall Avenue is also closed to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses.

3.2 The additional closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic means that any northbound traffic on Woodland Road will have no alternative but to turn down Elton Road and, comparing the two sets predicted traffic flows, it can be seen that in the peak periods the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic more than doubles the traffic predicted to divert past the school from 30 to 67 vehicles.

3.3 Compared to the 2024 Do Minimum scenario the 2024 Do Something scenario traffic flows on Elton Road are 17% and 32% higher in the AM and PM peaks, respectively, which is a significant increase.

3.4 The general assessment methodology set out in the Arup TA and Addendum for the redistribution of traffic flows as a result of the UoB proposals based on the results of the ANPR appears to be an appropriate approach. However, the assumed re-routing of traffic of individual movements has been reviewed and it is considered likely that some of the traffic assumed to divert onto the wider network will actually remain on the roads surrounding the school and hence traffic flows on Elton Road will be higher than those assessed.

3.5 In relation to the assumed re-routing of individual traffic movements the following diversion assumptions the AM peak flows are queried:

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Movement 1: Woodlands Road Northbound

• Flows from Queen's Avenue - 14 vehicles diverted via Elmdale Road (N), from existing routes via Elmdale Rd(S)/University Road/Priory Rd/Tyndalls Park Road the existing routes are longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via the existing route (possibly school/University drop-off or deliveries) and might instead circle the school and divert via Elton Road.

• Flows from Upper Maudlin Street - 28 vehicles are diverted via St Michaels Hill from existing routes via Woodlands Rd/St Michaels Park/Tyndalls Park Road. The existing routes are longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via these existing routes and it is likely that these vehicles would go via Elton Road /Tyndall Avenue instead.

• U1 Buses are proposed to be re-routed via Tyndall Avenue but there are no HV diversions from Woodlands Rd (S) onto Tyndall Avenue shown on the flow figure.

Movement 6: St Michael’s Park Left Turn

• Flows from St Michael's Hill (N) to Upper Maudlin St - 32 vehicles diverted from the existing route via Woodlands Rd to continue along St Michaels Hill. The existing route is longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via existing route. It is likely that these vehicles would divert via Tyndall Avenue instead.

Movement 7: Woodland Road (S) Right-Turn

• Flows Upper Maudlin St - 33 vehicles are diverted from the existing route via Woodlands Rd and Tyndall Avenue and 28 continue along St Michaels Hill (5 head westbound on Tyndall Avenue. The existing route is longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via existing route or St Michaels Hill is already too congested and is avoided.

3.6 There are similar queries regarding the PM peak re-distribution flows:

Movement 1: Woodlands Road Northbound

• Flows from Queen's Avenue - 17 vehicles diverted from existing routes via Elmdale Rd(S)/University Road/Priory Rd/Tyndalls Park Road to Elmdale Road (N), the existing routes are longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via the existing route and are likely to continue to circle the school and then divert along Elton Road instead.

• Flows from Upper Maudlin Street - 40 vehicles are diverted via St Michaels Hill from existing routes via Woodlands Rd/St Michaels Park/Tyndalls Park Road. The existing routes are longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via these existing routes and it is likely that these vehicles would go via Elton Road /Tyndall Avenue instead.

• U1 Buses are proposed to be re-routed via Tyndall Avenue but there are no HV diversions from Woodlands Rd (S) onto Tyndall Avenue shown on the flow figure.

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Movement 6: St Michael’s Park Left Turn

• Flows from St Michael's Hill (N) to Upper Maudlin St - 8 vehicles diverted from the existing route via Woodlands Rd to continue along St Michaels Hill. The existing route is longer so it is likely that these trips have an underlying reason to go via existing route. It is likely that these vehicles would divert via Tyndall Avenue instead.

Movement 7: Woodland Road (S) Right-Turn

• Flows Upper Maudlin St - 53 vehicles are diverted from the existing route via Woodlands Rd and Tyndall Avenue and 50 continue along St Michaels Hill (3 head westbound on Tyndall Avenue. The existing route is longer so it is possible that these trips have an underlying reason to go via existing route or that the route along St Michael’s Hill is already too congested and is avoided.

3.7 If fewer trips are diverted from the Woodlands Road/Elton Road/Tyndall Avenue junction than predicted and, as a worst case, all the above traffic stayed on roads in the vicinity of the school then traffic flows on Elton Road could potentially be around 100 vehicles higher than currently assessed within the Arup TA Addendum.

3.8 Pupils from the school (as young as four years) cross Elton Road frequently throughout the day when passing to and from the main school site and the teaching space in properties on the north side of the road. The school is concerned for the safety of its pupils with regards to any increase in traffic along Elton Road.

3.9 Elton Road is also used by the school’s coaches, which make a number of trips between the school and its off-site sporting facilities throughout the school day, and it is also used for school deliveries/servicing. Therefore, any increase in flows on Elton Road, both pedestrian and vehicular, will have an impact on the day to day operation of the school.

4 Review of Impact of Pedestrian Flows along Elton Road

4.1 The proposed development will lead to an increase in east/west pedestrian movements to and from the Hawthorns site. The Arup TA indicates a potential peak increase of 800 pedestrian movements per hour. This prediction is based on a net increase in study spaces provided on the Hawthorns site and based on the existing pattern of arrivals and departures at the existing Arts and Social Services Library on Tyndall Avenue.

4.2 However, no allowance in the predicted pedestrian flows appears to be made regarding the other facilities provided within the Library development, which includes a significant amount of event and exhibition space and a large café.

4.3 The assumed distribution of pedestrian trips on the local highway network has been based on a cordon survey of pedestrian flows into and out of the study area, which assumes that 11% of pedestrian trips will be via Elton Road. Whilst, the existing distribution of pedestrian movements is a good starting point to estimate the distribution of additional pedestrian movements on the local highway network it does not take into consideration the impact of relocating a big generator of trips such as the Library within the study area from Tyndall Avenue to the corner of Woodland Road/Elton Road. The adopted sensitivity test assessment of 22% of pedestrian trips being via Elton Road is considered to be a more realistic of distribution of additional pedestrian movements as a result of the proposed development.

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4.4 There are existing capacity issues on Elton Road, and on the network beyond, at the times when peak student and pupil movements coincide. Both student and pupil movements are peaked in relation to the start and end of the school day and also lectures/lesson change-over periods.

4.5 Pedestrians regularly have to step into the road to pass (the footpath reduces to only 1.35m in places). This is exacerbated by the tendency of both students and pupils to walk in groups and the fact that north/south School pupil movements will clash with east/west student movements.

4.6 TDM requested in its May 2020 consultation response that the applicants are asked to explore the provision of a widened footway on the north side of Elton Road, which is the side of the road where the majority of younger pupils are based, and the side that the new Library will be located on, so will be likely to take feel the effects of the increased pedestrians. Any widening should retain adequate width for contraflow cycling. Buildouts may need to be reduced to accommodate this but speed tables will reduce traffic speeds and allow for localised crossing activity.

4.7 A technical note was submitted by the applicant and TDM commented in its August 2020 consultation that Whilst TDM did not agree with the methodology of the survey, TDM subsequently undertook alternative modelling which demonstrated that pedestrian flows would sit within acceptable levels according to Transport for London’s Pedestrian Comfort Level guidance, apart from peak periods when coaches are embarking / disembarking, which is to be expected.

4.8 It is agreed that the TfL Pedestrian Comfort Level guidance (version 2 2019) is a more appropriate basis of assessment than that provided within Arup’s TA Addendum. However, no information regarding the alternative assessment undertaken by TDM has been provided and so it is not possible to verify what assumptions have been made in this assessment and, hence, whether the conclusions drawn are valid.

4.9 The TfL guidance is based on hourly flows and as both student and pupil movement are highly peaked in nature compared to general pedestrian movements in residential areas it is considered appropriate to consider pedestrian capacity of the footways on Elton Road for these peak periods. The TDM assessment indicates that during peak periods that the predicted pedestrian flows on Elton Road would not meet the acceptable criteria.

4.10 Given the peaked nature of the conflicting pedestrian movements on Elton Road and the fact that pupils and students tend to move in groups it is considered that a dynamic pedestrian assessment would provide a more accurate assessment of the impact of the proposed development rather than the static assessments undertaken by Arup and TDM. Pedestrians are already observed having to step into the road on a regular basis to pass during peak periods and this can only become a more frequent occurrence as pedestrian movements along Elton Road increase.

4.11 TDM also indicated the need to retain coach and car parking for the school as a reason why footways on Elton Road could not be widened. The school was, and is still, willing to engage with both the University and the Council to explore options for how pedestrian safety on Elton Road could be improved without adversely impacting the school’s day-to-day operation, possibly involving the relocation of coach parking to University Road.

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4.12 The reallocation of road space to provide improved pedestrian and cycle safety is entirely in line with local and government transport policy and with the recent measures put in place around the city to ensure people can safely socially distance in order to comply with Covid-19 guidelines and re.

5 Review of Impact on the Operation of the Local Highway Network

5.1 The closure of Woodland Road and Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic will affect the routing of traffic to the school from the north-east and push traffic onto sensitive parts of the highway network (such as St Michaels Hill, Queen Avenue, Queens Road, The Triangle and Park Row) which already suffer from congestion.

5.2 The predicted change in traffic flows associated with the proposed development has been considered for the local highway network surrounding the site. Further assessment in the form of junction capacity testing has been undertaken for those junctions which experience an increase in 5% of traffic and an increase of 100 vehicles/hr, on any approach in any peak period.

5.3 The threshold criteria do not take into consideration the impact on junctions of the increase in pedestrian movements, such as the Queen’s Avenue/Queen’s Road junction at which the existing zebra crossing adjacent to the give-way on Queen’s Avenue has a significant impact on the operation of the junction. Nor does it take into account whether or not an existing junction is already operating at capacity or not.

5.4 Within the original Arup TA a total of six junctions were the subject of detailed junction modelling but within the TA Addendum only four junctions were assessed. The two junctions which were not assessed again in the TA Addendum were Queen’s Avenue/Queen’s Road and the B4051 Upper Maudlin Street/St Michael’s Hill junctions, both of which would be additionally affected by change in traffic flows resulting from the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses.

5.5 Within the original Arup TA it is noted that at the Queen’s Avenue/Queen’s Road PICADY is not able to model a zebra crossing located directly adjacent to the give way line and that, therefore, the results should be treated with some caution. Unlike the other junctions assessed the 2019 Do Minimum results have not been calibrated against the observed queue lengths at this junction. It has therefore not been demonstrated that the PICADY model of the Queen’s Avenue/Queen’s Road junction properly reflects the current operation of this junction.

5.6 The PICADY results do not appear to reflect that the left turn into Queen’s Avenue is affected by the operation of zebra crossing, which leads to congestion on Queen’s Road as well as Queen’s Avenue. If the operation of the junction cannot be fully assessed using PICADY then, in a similar manner to the Woodland Road/Tyndall Avenue junction, a VISSIM model, calibrated against the observed queuing at this junction, should be used to assess the implications of the proposed development.

5.7 The summary of BCC Consultation Feedback in Table 1 of the TA Addendum indicates that the Tyndall Avenue/St Michael’s Hill junction will not function effectively, and due to geometry constraints can only be resolved by removing traffic.

5.8 The University has agreed in principle to provide a contribution towards a traffic reduction feasibility study as part of the Section 106 Agreement with the scope of such a study to be agreed between University and BCC post-determination.

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5.9 There is no guarantee that such a study would be able to identify improvements which would sufficiently reduce the traffic in order for the Tyndall Avenue/St Michael’s Hill junction to operate effectively nor is there any commitment given that the University would fully fund any improvements identified.

5.10 Looking in detail at the junction assessment of the for the Tyndall Avenue/St Michael’s Hill junction it can be seen, from the extract from the Arup TA Addendum below, that as a result of the proposed development, the junction is predicted to go from operating within capacity with only minimal queuing in the 2024 Do Minimum scenario to being predicted to be operating over practical capacity and close to theoretical capacity in the AM peak period. The right turn queue on St Michael’s Hill is precited to increase from around 2 PCU to 17 PCU with delay predicted to increase from 11.29s to 80.61s.

5.11 It is noted that the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses is demonstrated within the TA Addendum to worsen the predicted operation of the critical Tyndall Avenue/St Michael’s Hill junction rather than improve it.

5.12 It should also be appreciated the vehicle tracking in the Arup TA and Addendum, as shown in the extract overleaf, shows that a large vehicle turning left from Tyndall Avenue to St Michael’s Hill can only do so by crossing over the centre line of St Michael’s Hill i.e. where vehicles will be waiting to turn right. The proposed re-routing of the U1 bus service will significantly increase the number of bus services turning left out of Tyndall Avenue onto St Michael’s Hill with this service running at a frequency of a bus every 6 minutes in peak periods.

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5.13 Therefore, it is expected that in reality the Tyndall Avenue/St Michael’s Hill will operate significantly worse than is predicted within the TA Addendum and will be over-capacity. It should be appreciated that once a junction exceeds its theoretical capacity that the predicted level of queuing and vehicle delay rise exponentially.

5.14 The benefits given for the closure of Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses is a reduction in the impact on regular bus services of the scheme. From the junction assessments presented in the TA Addendum closing Tyndall Avenue for eastbound traffic decreases the predicted average delay on Tyndall Avenue but this is offset by an increase in vehicle delay on the right-turn into Tyndall Avenue from St Michael’s Hill which means that by keeping Tyndall Avenue two-way buses would only be delayed by around an additional 10s, which is not a significant difference.

5.15 The predicted delay to vehicles, including regular bus services, turning right into Tyndall Avenue from St Michael’s Hill as a result of the proposed closure of Woodland Road increases by around 70s and therefore if delay to regular bus services is a significant cause for concern to BCC it would be more appropriate that Woodland Road remains open rather than to further restrict traffic movements with the closure of Tyndall Road to eastbound traffic.

5.16 In summary it is considered that the wider consequences and impacts of closing Woodland Road and Tyndall Avenue to eastbound traffic with the exception of buses have not yet been robustly tested within the application. The limited benefits of proposed realm scheme, which provides a localised improvement to the pedestrian environment adjacent to the University, is not considered sufficient to justify the significant impact on the operation of the local highway network, including pedestrian safety and the delay to public transport users.

on 2020-09-23   OBJECT

As a former pupil of Bristol Grammar School and very familiar with the area as a result Iam shocked that the University has proposed a building of this scale and design on this site.

The proposed building will dwarf all the buildings around it and will clearly overshadow the listedpremises of Bristol Grammar. The architects intend, as stated in the press release from theUniversity noting the submission of the planning application, for the proposed building to be a newlandmark for Bristol. They have clearly invested no thought, nor do I suspect they care one iota,how a building of this scale and design can fit sympathetically into the area. Their goal isarchitectural statement and nothing more.

Aside from the scale of the building, its design is hyper-modern and reminiscent of brutalistarchitecture. The contrast between the traditional natural stone design of the Victorian era villas ofElton Rd and Woodfield Rd and perpendicular gothic architecture of the Grammar School couldnot be starker. It is like some sort of giant spaceship has landed (and not in extensive groundsallowing it to be set back in context, but directly abutting the pavement). The proposed buildingdoes not even sit well with the existing (more) modern Senate House, over which it would seemlikely to cast a considerable shadow.

I have no doubt, were it constructed, the proposed building would date quickly and become evenmore of an eyesore to the city than it would be immediately after it was built. Given its scale, itcannot be concealed and would be seen from some distance away and from many parts of the

city. Certainly, it would be very clear on the skyline as one descended from the downs viaBlackboy Hill / Whiteladies Road, given the Grammar School Great Hall can clearly be seen fromthat locale.

The demolition of the existing Hawthorns buildings and the construction this monstrosity will nodoubt cause chaos for ordinary Bristolians who live nearby or, who simply wish to take theirchildren to school each day, for a considerable period of time. It is not clear what, if any benefit,will accrue to the local (non-university affiliated) community by this proposal. Student spaces arenot generally spaces for the wider community.

In an age where knowledge is increasingly accessed remotely and via the internet, it is also notclear to me why such a large library facility is necessary. The internal space of the building isclearly wasteful in terms of usable space and perhaps that accounts for much of its size.

Clearly, the University requires a book depository for archive and working spaces for students. Iwould have thought that modestly proportioned central archive facilities and satellite libraries withappropriate working spaces for specific disciplines (spread appropriately across the University'sexisting estate) would be a vastly better solution to these requirements than cavernous, spacewasting, white elephants.

In my view, this proposal should be rejected and the University required to either select a bettersite for a building such as this, if one could be found, or alter their plans significantly to provide amore modestly proportioned building that fits in sympathetically with the character and design ofthe area.

on 2020-09-19   OBJECT

Whilst I have no doubt that the University is in need of an updated building to house their library etc I am concerned that the proposed architectural plans are not in keeping with the area and would pose an 'eye-sire' amongst the beautiful period buildings in the area. The likeness to 1970s architecture is worrying in that it would date quickly and have to be re done in later decades. Therefore proving a financial fiasco long term. Can the building not be designed in a Victorian or Georgian style on the exterior to reflect the other beautiful buildings of Bristol? Additionally whether the council likes it or not there will be problems with vehicles trying to park and needing access. Unless the public transport service is drastically improved in this area you will be pushing the problem out and making it worse

on 2020-09-17   OBJECT

I object to this proposal as I believe that the new library will be a horrendous largeeyesore for future generations causing substantial harm to the historical local area. This iscontrary to planning law. Do Councillors on the planning committee want this as their legacy toBristol? Nearby there are historical buildings especially the beautiful hall at BGS. I actually takeforeign family members to look at the hall as a tourist site and tell them how Harry Potter wasbased on the hall there. ( Rumour has it .) This hideous new building will inevitably causesignificant harm to that building. It's unimaginable how BCC can allow the university to harm sucha beautiful hall. The impact on neighbouring roads will also be significant especially to the roadadjacent to BGS. This is already a bottleneck. There are considerably young children crossing thisroad between the BGS main campus and adjacent teaching blocks and it's a miracle that no onehad been run over. This plan will increase traffic down this road and thus significantly heighten thelikelihood of injury. The clean air act is all over the place at present and BCC have no idea howmany vehicles will continue to be driven in this area. The bus service in Bristol is dire so many kidsare driven to this school from all over. It seems that BCC are quite happy to damage BGS tofavour the universities grand plans by allowing this dominating building to overshadow thesurroundings. . I feel that this whole plan is typical of the audaciousness of the university that isclearly dictating terms to BCC and taking over the city. In essence they are taking over publicspace ( Woodland Road ) and turning it into a university campus. But Woodland Road is a publicroad belonging to all of us.- not the university. University campuses usually develop on landactually owned by universities not on public roads. Why is BCC so dominated by the universitythat they can do anything including causing substantial harm to a conservation area and a

beautiful listed building and shutting down a road?

on 2020-09-17   OBJECT

I hope this application is refused. The Hawthorns Building is part of our History andheritage . I grew up with this building and will miss it. It fits in well with the other buildings on theRoads around. The design of the proposed library is awful. It doesn't fit in with the other buildingsnearby at all. Then there are the proposed changes to the Roads. They will cause extra trafficcongestion and difficulties in getting around quite unecessarily. Why should I lose the right to usethe roads so that the University can create a "plaza".Finally I think the University is big enough. It's time to say no to more expansion of the University.

on 2020-09-15   OBJECT

I am objecting to this proposal on the grounds that the proposed building will have ahugely negative visual impact. The proposed building is extremely out of keeping with thearchitectural character of the area, both in terms of style and in terms of scale.The sheer ugliness and conspicuousness of the design is an affront to residents for miles around,and the general sense of appropriation created by this and associated proposals is an insult to ourintelligence. If this building is allowed to go ahead, it will serve as a permanent and inescapablemonument to the University's disregard for local communities and to their shameless pursuit ofmoney. The fact that this building can be described as a landmark does not justify it. Any large-scale eyesore is a landmark, and Bristol is not in need of landmarks. The statement this buildingmakes is entirely offensive and arrogant, and the disregard that the University will doubtless showto this, and to all of the other objections that this proposal has garnered, serves to demonstrate assuch beyond doubt.

on 2020-09-14   OBJECT

The proposed library development is too large, its bulk and size is out of keeping withthe local character and it will adversely impact the school site opposite in terms of privacy andlight. Bristol does not need this carbuncle.

on 2020-09-14   OBJECT

Overbearing proposal on Grade 1 listed building ,its a statement building in the wrongplace , save it for the new campus in non built up area. Bristol Uni have to much power over thecouncil

on 2020-09-14   OBJECT

I am a local resident and parent of a pupil at Bristol Grammar School (BGS). I wish toobject in the strongest possible terms to these plans which significantly risk the safety andwellbeing of children of all ages, but particularly those of younger ages, who attend BGS. Thedisruption and local increases in pedestrian, vehicular and cycle traffic around the school siteappears to have been completed disregarded in this proposal together with its potentialconsequences for safety of pupils which Bristol City Council have an absolute duty to protect.

It is also astounding that the schools willingness to engage in three-way meetings between BGS,Bristol City Council and the University regarding this matter has been unilaterally rejected when amutually acceptable solution could have been reached through appropriate discussion andnegotiation.

If these proposals where to be approved without sufficient constructive 3 way dialogue betweenparties with an absolute focus on the safety of local school children then I fear the potentialconsequences will be far reaching for all involved, presumably with identified responsibility back toindividuals who approved the scheme with insufficient governance oversight.

on 2020-09-14   OBJECT

Given the safety concerns of the school (BGS, where I'm a parent) the scheme wouldbe greatly improved if you pedestrianised Elton Road as well. That would complete the campusfeel you are trying to develop creating a safe space for school pupils and students. There is noneed to keep traffic flowing down Elton Road. Parents can park on Elmdale, Priory and UniversityRoad, Woodland and Tyndell Avenue. Elmdale could be used to park school buses. Perhaps theUniversity and the school could get together to put on combined bus transport from key locationsaround the city (post COVID).

on 2020-09-13   OBJECT

never

on 2020-09-13   OBJECT

OBJECTION: INCREASESD TRAFFIC/ DANGER TO CHILDREN ON ELTON ROAD/CONCERNS OF BUS OPERATORS

I am astonished that Bristol City Council would consider any plan to increase traffic flow on EltonRoad. The road has an infant, junior and senior school on it. Children, aged from 4 to 18, areregular and frequent pedestrians on the road. Children are amongst the most vulnerable membersof the Bristol community and require the highest level of protection.

My legally parked car was hit by a bus, due to heavy traffic at 3.40pm, on Elton Road inSeptember 2015. See attached photo. We can only be grateful that it wasn't a child.

I had subsequent correspondence with Wessex Buses who were operating the University Busroutes at the time; to arrange having my car repaired and also to discuss unsafe driving. TheDirector of Safety was good enough to meet me on Elton Road in September 2015, outside theHawthorns at 3.30pm, to observe the traffic problems. After watching the buses, cars and childrenfor approximately 10 minutes, he agreed with me that it was an unsafe situation.

We agreed that the insurance of any transport provider would be invalidated in the event ofaccident, particularly an injury to a child, if they were knowingly operating in such dangerouscircumstances. See attached photographs of buses mounting curbs outside the Bristol Grammar

School Infant School, buses hitting lampposts outside Bristol Grammar School Senior School.

We walked to the junction of Elmdale Road and Priory Road so I could discuss with them whetherit could be used as an alternative bus route and a much better one for students as it leads directlyto the centre of the campus. Wessex Buses confirmed that with the removal of 2 parking bays onthe corner of Priory Road buses could easily turn up Priory Road. Wessex also stated that theUniversity of Bristol had told them that it wasn't possible for buses to turn into Priory Road so theywere using Elton Road as the alternative.

I corresponded with Patrick Finch in October 2015 (University of Bristol Director of Estates until2018) and Barra Mac Ruairi (current University of Bristol Director of Estates) about the problemson Elton Road.

Patrick Finch agreed that Elton Road was too busy and confirmed that the University of Bristol wascommitted to reducing the level of traffic on Elton Road and was working on a transport plan toreduce traffic on Elton Road. Please see attached e mail from Patrick Finch, and Barra Mac Ruairiwas included in the e mail correspondence. I do not understand why the University of Bristol is nolonger concerned about the safety of children.

The proposed changes to the Hawthorns Site will INCREASE the level of traffic on Elton Road andendanger the lives of the children and students using the road. There are reasonable alternativesavailable such as the use of Priory Road.

From: Patrick FinchSent: 13 October 2015 17:21To: susie_jackson@hotmail.co.ukCc: Executive PA to the Vice Chancellor Mailbox ; Barra Mac RuairiSubject: Elton Rd

Dear Susie

Thank you for your e-mail of the 8th October, which Professor Brady has asked me to respond to.

I can assure you that the University takes the safety of all users of the road network around ourcampus seriously. I was concerned to hear of your experiences and we have spoken directly toWessex about the actions that their drivers have taken.

I would also want to say that, while the University buses undoubtedly contribute to the overall

congestion at key times of day, they are not the only vehicles using Elton Rd. There are servicebuses, BGS coaches, delivery vehicles to both BGS and the University and of course a largenumber of cars that all contribute to the problem that you rightly identify.

I agree entirely with your view that there are better routes available. The University and the Schoolhave discussed the issue regularly over the past two years. We recognise that we need to find asolution that works for both parties but with the overall aim of making a substantial reduction intraffic using Elton Rd. This would benefit children, students and indeed any other pedestrian usersof the road.

The University has employed a transport consultant to come up with proposals that wouldreallocate traffic to alternative routes, including buses. This work was shared with BGS andultimately led to our joint submission of ideas to Bristol City Council for consideration. We arecurrently in dialogue with the City to see whether we can reach agreement on alternative routes,which we can then all work jointly on implementing. It is fair to say that alternatives are not perfectbut on balance we think that they are better than the situation now prevailing

I would reiterate that we are well aware of the issues on this stretch of road and are keen to find aviable long term solution, that benefits both BGS and the University and which does not createadditional problems for the City highways officers to manage.

Best wishesPatrick

Patrick FinchBursar and Director of Estates

Estates OfficeUniversity of Bristol1-9 Old Park HillBristolBS2 8BB

From: Susie JacksonSent: 05 October 2015 20:45To: barra@bristol.gov.uk ; simon.cook@bristol.gov.uk ; road.safety@bristol.gov.ukCc: vc-epa@bristol.ac.uk ; simon.dunn@rotala.co.uk

Subject: URGENT Elton Road - Dangerous

Dear Barra and Simon,

Please find attached some photographs I took today. Note, the Wessex Bus driving into a lamppost today outside Bristol Grammar School infant school in one photograph. Yet again, we canonly feel relief that it wasn't a child or student.

You will also note that the buses are mounting curbs outside the infant school and junior school onElton Road.

I was only on Elton Road from 8:30am to 8:35am and from 3:50pm to 3:55pm today. It isfrightening to think how often this must be happening now the University have restarted their term.

To remind you, last week a bus drove into my legally parked car on Elton Road last week whileschool children were exiting school at 15:44pm. I have contacted Wessex Buses about the dangerthis route presents and, to their credit, they have agreed to meet me on Elton Road to see forthemselves. Avon & Somerset Police have also been extremely helpful and expressed seriousconcern about regular dangerous driving outside an infant school.

I have yet to receive any kind of response from you. I have e-mailed, telephoned and sent webrequests.

I enjoyed reading Bristol City Council's 'A Safe Approach to Road Safety' document. I was alsodelighted to note that the Council recognises it's statutory responsibility as laid out in the 1988Road Traffic Act. In particular that in Section c "also requires the local highway authority toundertake preventative work in order to minimise the likelihood of a collision occurring on a newroad. In other words, it is not necessary to wait for a collision to happen before action is taken. InBristol, we have also interpreted this responsibility as applying to all existing roads as well as tothe new highway network. "

The Council also states it's commitment to protecting it's most vulnerable citizens, children, andthat "Bristol's transport system should give priority to the vulnerability of human beings and shouldnot focus on the encouragement of vehicle mobility at any price."

Elton Road does not need to be used as a 2 way bus route. It is a simple problem with a simplesolution. I can only conclude that the Council does not have the will to protect this group ofvulnerable road users.

This is now urgent and I am not prepared to wait for weeks for a response from the Council andcross my fingers that all the children and students stay safe.

Please contact me on 07841497121 to let me know what you intend to do.

Best wishesSusie Jackson

Dear Simon Cook,

Please find attached a photograph of a Wessex Bus driving into my legally parked car on EltonRoad at 15.44pm on 28 September 2015. My six year son was sat in the back of the car at thetime.

I am relieved that only my car was damaged and not a child. Elton Road has a junior school andan infant school located on it. It is becoming increasing busy with buses using both ways to serveuniversity students. I regularly see buses mounting pavements which are used by children aged 5to 18. It is an unacceptably dangerous situation for the children who use Bristol Grammar School.

I understand that the representatives from Bristol City Council have met with Bristol GrammarSchool to assess the traffic flow on Elton Road. However, I have been a parent at the school for 2years and so far the school has been unable to get the Council, Bristol University or WessexBuses to improve the situation. In fact, it is getting worse.

If a child is injured or killed outside the school, a response of "well, we were trying to do somethingabout it" from the responsible parties will be woefully inadequate.

So far I have been unable to speak to anyone from Wessex Buses about this accident. I am stillwaiting for their insurance details to get my car repaired. I have, however, managed to speak toAvon and Somerset Police and they were very helpful and interested in repeated instances ofdangerous driving outside a school.

Please could you call me on 07841497121 to discuss this situation. It is urgent that the traffic flow,and therefore the safety of the children, is improved.

Kind RegardsSusie

Sent from Windows Mail

on 2020-09-13   OBJECT

As a Respiratory Consultant working at the Bristol Royal Infirmary, I am writing to object to thedemolition of The Hawthorns on Woodland Road and redevelopment to accommodate a newUniversity of Bristol Library.

My principal concern relates to the acute and chronic lung health of children attending BristolGrammar School (BGS), which is in the immediate vicinity of the building works.

I do not believe the University has taken appropriate consideration and consultation with BGSschool regarding this issue. I believe the new University of Bristol Library could be built in adifferent location, thus avoiding this potential health risk.

The building works will have a significant impact on the air quality in this area for the duration ofthe project and beyond. This will be in the form of particulates due to increased emissions fromvehicles as well as dust from the demolition of the existing buildings. Both are well recognisedcauses of acute and chronic respiratory disease. (1)/(2).

Transportation and Highways:

The University has acknowledged that the proposed closure of Woodland Road will increase trafficon Elton Road which runs right through the middle of BGS school. As such pupils will experience

increased exposure to vehicle emissions as they move from lesson to lesson and also whilstoutside playing.

A report by the World Health Organisation (WHO) 'Air Pollution and Child Health: PrescribingClean Air' (3) summarises the latest research on linkages between air pollution and child health,noting that air pollution affects children "in uniquely damaging ways". A report by UNICEF 'Healthyair for every child; A call for national action' (4) discusses the need for 'emissions reduction inchild-centric locations' and 'encouraging behaviour change to reduce children's exposure'.

The children attending BGS school range from 4-18 years of age.

Eighty percent of alveolar (air sac) development occurs after birth. The lungs and alveoli aren'tfully grown until adulthood.

As children breathe faster than adults, they take in more polluted air. A six year old breathes intwice as much air as an adult relative to their weight.

Children have more respiratory infections than adults, which can increase their susceptibility to airpollution.

Children experience particularly high concentrations of air pollution while they are on the schoolrun and when playing outside at break time.

Children are more active when playing outdoors and consequently they inhale more pollutedoutdoor air than adults.

I kindly ask you to prioritise the respiratory health of Bristol children. I ask that the University ofBristol considers an alternative location for the Library building so as to minimise the impact toBGS children's respiratory health and wellbeing. Alternatively the University of Bristol could revisetheir current plans to significantly reduce traffic flow immediately around the BGS site.

1.Children and air pollution -American Lung Associationhttp://www.lung.org/clean-air/outddors/who-is-at-risk/children-and-air-pollution2.Construction -Lung disease https://www.hse.gov.uk/lung-disease/construction.htm3.WHO Report October 2018 'Air Pollution and Child Health: Prescribing Clean Air'http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/air-pollution-child-health/en/4.Unicef.org.uk/cleanair

on 2020-09-12   OBJECT

I believe the proposed redevelopment is too high and will physically dominate itsneighbours and be out of proportion to its surroundings.

It is my understanding that the proposal includes a suggestion to make tyndalls avenue one waywestbound only. The current circulation of traffic around the BGS site due to the one wayrestrictions on University Road and Elton Road, make the use of Tyndalls Avenue essential fortraffic fishing to exit this circulatory flow. Furthermore the essential pedestrian crossing onWoodland Rd frequently creates jams of traffic which leads to frustrated drivers and traffic pollutionand an increased risk of smaller pedestrians such as school children being inadvertently injured inaccidents. it is essential to maintain eastbound use of tyndalls avenue to allow traffic to leave thiscongested area, as well as continuing to allow traffic to move westbound to avoid st michaels parkwest (where southbound traffic will again be frequently blocked by the woodland road crossing)

Lastly, it has been my experience that recent University redevelopments which have causedtemporary traffic measures on Tyndalls park rd and at the top of woodland road (just beforeuniversity road) have caused significant disruption to the area, and been poorly organised andcaused significant disruption. in fact the road surface on the stretch of woodland road betweenuniversity road and cantocks close has yet to be restored to a satisfactory condition.

on 2020-09-12   OBJECT

Dear Sir / Madam,

As a parent of two children at Bristol Grammar School and former pupil, I wanted to formally lodgea strong objection to the planned development.

Bristol Grammar School has been on this site for hundreds of years, providing a huge benefit totens of thousands of children.The school is inclusive and diverse meaning it attracts children from across the region - many ofwhom cannot take public transport to school.Therefore, the council MUST ensure ALL children have a safe environment to get to and fromschool and whilst they are at school.

- Closing off Woodland Road will increase traffic along Elton Road - this is huge safety issue forthe pupils (many of whom are under 11 years old), not fully considered or tested. The currentcongestion is already dangerous enough.- The University has no right to endanger the children at the school just because it wishes toexpand its services and close off local routes to the school.- Pavements are not wide enough in the proposal on Elton Road. At peak times, due to the currentfoot and cycle traffic, many children are already forced to walk onto the road and some have beenhit by cyclists.- Construction in the area will last for years and the noise will be adverse to school education, let

alone the added danger caused by increased traffic congestion both during and after construction.- My children are educated in the building adjacent to the Hawthorns site - there is no way theycan be educated properly with massive construction going on literally within a few feet of theclassrooms.- The resultant building is too large for the area and overbearing, thus negatively impacting thelocal heritage and amenity value of the area.

I suggest the council planners look at this from a different angle and, as a priority, draw upappropriate plans with the school for the area that ensure safety of the school children, bearing inmind that they need to be dropped off, picked up and be able to cross the road safely.Any 'business' plans to expand in the area should then be formulated around this "pupil safe" plan.

Kind regardsAndrew Maggs

on 2020-09-12   OBJECT

I object to the proposals on the grounds of the safety and welfare of the BGS pupils andUniversity students. I have concerns with the proposed re-modelling of local highways and publicrealm and also from the scale of the building and its consequential overbearing impact on theSchool premises.

on 2020-09-11   OBJECT

As a parent of a child at BGS, I object strongly to further development and the resultingincreased traffic in the area. It is already high risk for children moving to and from the school and Ibelieve that this will only endanger them further plus increase pollution.

on 2020-09-11   OBJECT

I object to the current proposals.

My daughter is a bursary recipient to attend Bristol Grammar Junior.

Both my husband and I are disabled, I am housebound whilst my Husband performs the schoolrun and travels from Knowle to Bristol Grammar School each week.

I am deeply concerned about the change in traffic the current proposal will cause and how it willput all of the children who attend the Infants, Junior and Secondary School at great risk.

University of Bristol students already walk the pavements in large gangs that force the childrenand parents walking to school, to then have to walk on the road. My daughter has been knockeddown a kerb into the road and has got caught up and pushed along by Uni students a number oftimes.My Husband is blind in one eye and partially sighted in the other and it is imperative for both hisand our daughter's safety that the area around BGS does not get overwhelmed with tall unistudents who show a complete disregard to the children.There are infants required to cross that road to attend assemblies and secondary students accessdifferent classes in buildings and venues on either side of the road.

I don't think we are adverse to the expansion of the university but the proposal in its current form

will be responsible for putting children's lives at risk.

Can you please reconsider and go back to the literal drawing board to take into consideration thechildren of BGS?

You have a responsibility to keep these children safe, especially if you want them to survive intoadulthood and attend Bristol University.

We are opposed to the current proposal and respectfully request that any designs moving forwardlook beyond the immediate needs of the university.

As disabled parents, we rely on good governance and city planning to enable our family to accessall the rich heritage and opportunities the City of Bristol can offer.

Please don't make it dangerous for my daughter to attend her dream school.

We are just a normal family from Knowle, we're not affluent by any means, but we will do anythingto give our daughter the best possible start in life.

So please, take a bit more time to see the bigger picture and work with Bristol Grammar School tocreate a formidable University Campus which is safe for children and better for the environment.

Thank you

on 2020-09-11   OBJECT

I object to the proposals in their current form for a number of reasons

1) the new road layout proposed will drive excessive traffic down Elton road and have a severelydetrimental impact on the entrances to the school there. I believe it would be dangerous tochildren who attend the school from age 5 from both a traffic and air quality point of view. It will begridlocked in the mornings.

2)the design for the new library is overbearing and not in keeping with the surrounding buildings, inparticular the great hall of Bristol Grammar School over the road and the mathematics buildingrecently refurbished due to fire. I have no objection to a new library but don't see why it shoulddominate the area so much which is still residential and already dominated Quite enough by theuniversity.

on 2020-09-11   OBJECT

The approach to Bristol Grammar School is already hazardous for young pedestrians.Having studied the plans it is very clear that this proposal would make a bad situation worse andwould endanger the lives of my child and other children travelling too and from school.Please, please do not grant this proposal permission.Regards,Mark Linfield

on 2020-09-11   OBJECT

The proposals will result in a lot of upheaval, noise, dust and safety concerns for theneighbours. In particular concern is Bristol grammar school its staff and pupils will have to endure5 years living on a building site. it will cause a huge amount of traffic problems and access issuesparticularly in bringing and picking up children from the school.

For pupils at the school and students at the university having to put up with heavy machinery for 5years seems to go against providing a safe and quiet place to learn. This could be better plannedto mitigate these concerns.

on 2020-08-30   OBJECT

I cannot believe such a large monster building is aloud to be built . The university istaking over the city , there are thousands more student accommodation areas now way beyondwhat it needed and sustainable.Please scale down the site to be more in keeping with its surroundings

on 2020-08-29   OBJECT

Like Cambridge and Oxford Universities, Bristol is not campus based university andshould not try to alter its character or the character of the locality of Tyndalls Park.The design is brutalist and will dominate this Victorian suburb. It will overshadow the beautiful andhistoric Great Hall of Bristol Grammar School which predates the university.It will also loom over the Senate House and the former Baptist College.This is a Conservation Area and this huge very modern edifice will detract in a major way from theambiance of the locality.

on 2020-08-28   OBJECT

What is the plan to compensate nearby residents for the horrendous air pollution thedemolition is going to cause? The building on TPR which is tiny in comparison caused awful dust& poor air quality & there was no apology or explanation from the university.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

I object to the plans on the basis of:Displacement of existing historic non-university institutions.Detrimental effect on traffic flow.Detrimental effect on neighborhood.

If UOB want a campus, it should be built away from the urban centre. Our city is not for sale.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

Objecting to more of our period properties and conservation area being taken over bystudent campus and accommodation. It results in more problems for local residents due to antisocial behaviour etc.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

Objecting to more of our period properties and conservation area being taken over bystudent campus and accommodation. It results in more problems for local residents due to antisocial behaviour etc.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

Interest - Summary of objection to revised cycle lane proposals submitted on 7 July, andfurther modifications described in Bristol City Council letter of 5 August 2020.

I am a North Bristol resident and use the cycle route marked through the area from Cotham Hill toreach the city centre, the Triangle, College Green and St Michaels itself.

I objected to the application because it is grossly out of character for the area, and because thepublic realm works are designed to obscure and obstruct the cycle route and cycling on otherroads.

I have examined the revised design including a cycle lane and restate my objections because:

(a) The lane width is inadequate, being only 3 metres whereas the full width of the road is currentlyavailable.

(b) There are various features designed to make cycling difficult, ostensibly on safety grounds,including the narrow width, and bends introduced in other places to slow cyclists. There is noevidence that cyclists are currently dangerous, any future hazard will arise from the universitiesdesire the obstruct the current streets with a campus.

(c) The University appears to feel that repeated fiddling with details of kerbs and paving will make

its fundamentally flawed proposals and layout acceptable.

Since the University is plainly moving its centre of activity to the Temple Meads site, which will bea camputs, the new library building should be located there, and other university monstrositiesalso relocated, leaving the current sites for clearance and construction of housing in keeping withthe area, which includes a wide range of house sizes.

The council should make it clear to the University that this area is neither suitable nor available fora campus university and the university should cease wasting resident and council time withrepeated applications to create one.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

Closure of Woodland Road will increase traffic volumes on Elton Road past BristolGrammar School, which spans the road.The Majors changes to traffic flow on the center has increased traffic on Park Row, and Woodlandroad as a bypass for the triangle. Closure of woodland road would inevitable force cross towntraffic down Elton road and through the middle of a school.

on 2020-08-27   OBJECT

The pedestrianisation of Tyndall Ave will cause excessive traffic elsewhere in the area.It also turns a residential area into a campus, to the detriment of long term local residents. Thenew building is out of proportion compared to neighbouring buildings of historical significance eg.Bristol Grammar School.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

The demolition of this building has not considered the overall environmental impact. Theexisting building could still be redesigned to accommodate the library. Exhibition and events couldclearly be accommodated elsewhere in the university's expansive accommodation - you don'tneed to demolish a perfectly good building. Has anyone calculated the CO2 release resulting fromdemolishing and rebuilding? The students who you want to use this facility will be the ones whohave to clean up the environmental impact in the future!

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to the proposed redevelopment of the Hawthornes site. The proposal isextremely biased towards the needs of the university and does not consider the considerableimpact on the nearby school and residents.Bristol Grammar is a large school, educating children from the age of 4 to 18. Parents andguardians of the children attending this school come from many parts of the city; as such, they aretravelling by car as they are continuing their journey to work. It is not feasible for parents orguardians of young children to allow them take public transport on their own, additionally there areno car parking facilities close to the school, which would allow parents to park and walk theirchildren to the school premises. This proposal has no consideration for the impact the proposedtraffic flow would have on the teachers, parents and children commuting to and from the school.

Cutting off the traffic around the school campus will undoubtedly led to congestion and parking onthe narrow roads close to the school. This will have a negative impact on the residents of nearbyareas.

In addition, the building itself is not in keeping with the beautiful architecture of the area. This areaof the city has some beautiful old buildings and the proposed building does not complement this inany way.

The university is an important part of our city, but it is only one part of the vibrant and diversecommunity that makes up this city. Creating a 'campus' in this public area is essentially marking

this area out as use for the university only and beginning to further segregate this city.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to the proposed development on the basis that it will create a loss of light due tothe size of the of the proposed building. The proposed size and style of the building is not inkeeping with the surrounding area. The road changes have a significant impact on the nearbyBristol Grammar School were my son attends, and will increase the volume of traffic between theinfants (where he attends) and the main school (where the children have lunch etc). It thereforeheightens the risk of there being an accident. The increased flow of traffic down Elton Road willalso increase the amount of pollution right outside the children's playground. On the basis of all ofthis I object to this proposal going ahead.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

There are many objections to this proposal from the University. The principal one is thelong-term increase in danger to pedestrians and cyclists by displacement of vehicles fromWoodland Road to the adjoining roads. Particular problems are the pinch points on St Michael'sHill and pinch points for buses.

A second is is the "land grab" by the University in trying to create a campus. The most egregiousexample of this is the dishonest labelling, in the University's publicity material, of Highbury Villasas part of the University campus area. It is not part of the University campus and never has been.

The third is the years of building work and disruption together with the loss of parking spaces. Theongoing building work by the University already causes significant parking problems locallybecause the contractors' vans occupy the majority of the parking spaces to the detriment of localbusinesses and also local residents. Although the University says that they should not do that,they take absolutely no steps to ensure compliance. The problem is dumped on the residents.

The fourth objection is an aesthetic one. I do not like the building. However, I accept this is amatter of personal taste and is not shared by everybody.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

This building project will create too much disruption to residents who already have a lotto stomach. The university must be stopped in it's continual land grab. Bristol already has severallibraries that could do with support. Pls support existing libraries that are free for all the residentsof Bristol. There is inevitably going to be chaos for many years if this is allowed to go ahead. Thenoise, traffic, dirt, huge lorries, road closures, are intolerable every time the university decide toclose down another road and start building. It is selfish and unnecessary. The university needs tolearn to respect their neighbours. They are destroying the area. If this is allowed to go ahead theopposition by local groups and bad feeling from neighbours is likely to become dangerous.Residents have had enough.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I write as a local resident living very close to the Uni. I do not have an objection todemolishing the Hawthorns and replacing it with a striking modern building, and I welcome theintention to make some of it open to the public. Also, I am pleased to see that a (comparatively)small sum has been promised to improve St Michael's Hill. But there are no details of what isproposed, or when it would happen.However, I OBJECT STRONGLY to the Uni's plan to take over the road outside the (present)Hawthorns and make it pedestrianised for these reasons. (1) The Uni is a city-centre Uni NOT acampus. I am sick and tired of complaining to the Uni about labelling this locality as a 'Campus'when it isn't, including putting up maps of the 'Campus' which have the breathtaking arrogance toinclude local streets including the road I live in. (2) On grounds of safety, I am appalled that theplans include a prediction of increasing traffic on St Michael's Hill. We who live there KNOW howdangerous this road is, that traffic speeds through, that pavements are so narrow that pedestrianswalk in the road (including jay-walking groups of students). On Fridays - bin day - the pavement iscluttered with wheelie bins and there is NO ROOM to walk safely on the pavement. Buses andlarge vehicles actually mount to pavement - I've seen it. (3) Local people will suffer years of livingclose to a building site, with all the accompanying noise, white van parking, and disruption. WeSTILL - after two years - have to put up with the pavement blocked by the Uni in Tyndalls ParkRoad after the Humanities Building project - how much worse is this disruption going to be with amuch bigger building project.

I urge the Council to REFUSE the Uni's land-grabbing attempt to take over our roads and turn this

part of our city into a campus.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I believe that the new development will affect the traffic and road for the localcommunity. Many of the buildings are beautiful in character for the area buildings. The Universityare not taking into account the local area and residents despite what they believe the city is morethan the university the future expansion should be taken outside the city where plenty ofbrownfield sites could be used for development

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

My objection is simple. The university wishes to convert a part of what is already thepublic realm i.e. that area we are free to use for its normal purpose, and restrict its use to thebenefit of the univeristy alone. In so doing a significant negative impact is made upon the localcommunity.

The proposed pedestrian area between the Senate building and the new library will cause traffic tobe redirected along St Michael's Hill, a road which is already busy and constricted in layout. Theuniveristy's own estimates show a substantial increase in traffice during busy periods if thescheme is put in place. The danger to pedestrians - particulalrly students walking to and from theuniversity - will be substantially increased.

There is a perferectlt acceptable alternative to the university's proposal. That part of the WoodlandRoad between the Senate building and the new library could be reconfigured as shared space -something that is done worldwide. The existing traffic flows can as a result continue as they arenow.

This may not fit with the university's desire for an all enveloping campus, however it needs torecognise that the the University of Bristol is embedded in a city. This gives it a great advantage inits appeal to students. However, it also places constraints on its freedom. It must respect theneeds and wishes of the community within which it is placed.

That part of the application associated with stopping up of Woodland Road to traffice other thancyclists should be rejected along with the related redirection of traffic.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to the re-design of the Hawthorns building. The proposed re-design is not inkeeping with the historical buildings in the surrounding area.I have concerns for the welfare of children at Bristol Grammar School and those living in the localvicinity due to the re-direction of traffic and higher traffic flow outside of the school which is alreadya dangerous road. This will lead to greater air pollution, again affecting the school children andlocal residents.The proposed new building with block out natural light from the school, again at the detriment tothe school children, wildlife and those living near by.I do not support this planning application.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

On Behalf of the HIghbury Villas Residents' Association, I object to this proposedscheme. The proposal to close Tyndalls Avenue to traffic apart from buses and bikes and create apedestrian thoroughfare for the university creates some significant issues for us neighbours andlocal residents.

Parking: The proposed loss of parking spaces in the scheme which is a large % of the parkingspaces within the current area where parking is already under huge pressure is unacceptable.This proposal will add to the already huge pressure on local parking, despite the KingsdownResident Parking Scheme, especially outside of the RPZ hours. Pressure on local parking will onlyincrease, becoming intolerable for local residents, who already fear to move their cars in case theycan't park when they return. Local residents frequently drive down both Tyndalls Avenue and StMichaels Park and the existing car parking spaces are always full during working hours, eveningsand weekends so where will these cars go? There is no protection from the local RPZ. There isnothing in the proposals about how the university will address this issue and ensure local residentswill be able to park in an area with much reduced parking.

St Michaels Park and the Closure of Woodlands Road in front of the new building: The proposal touse of St Michaels Park as the new road for all car traffic is not proven. This area is already verycongested, especially at school drop off and pick up times. And while the suggestion of someS106 planning gain to improve St Michaels Hill is useful, the amount of money proposed is tinycompared with the work needed (as we've explored in the past through the Highbury Place

scheme). If Tyndalls Avenue and part of Woodlands Road is closed to cars traffic, this congestionwill be exacerbated.

We're also very concerned about the closure of Woodlands Road. This will create a rat run downSt Michaels Park especially during peak hours and create more traffic on St Michaels Hill as thetraffic survey shows with increases of 48% or over 150 cars in the morning peak expected. This isalso at a time when there is an increase in pedestrians with schools and people walking to thecentre, university and UBHT at the beginning of the day.

Woodlands Road Closure: As local residents, the closure of Woodlands Road and creating ineffect a road in two halves, creates very difficult access for local residents to Highbury Villas,especially between the triangle and St Michaels Hill. Not being able to turn right from WhiteladiesRoad onto Tyndall Park road doesn't help our access. We also have a concern that the universityhave only considered the proposed closure and pedestrianisation of this space. No other optionsappear to have been considered and certainly none are proposed for consultation. There is noclarity about whether any consideration been given to creating a shared space (such as beensuccessful in many European cities) which would allow a flow through of access for localresidents. Woodlands Road and Tyndalls Avenue are both public roads and need to bemaintained as such, not closed off because the University wants to create some space forstudents.

Safety: We are very concerned that the proposed buses and bikes space of Tyndalls Ave willmean that it will be deserted - or at least very empty of people - in the evenings, especially out ofterm time. Local residents frequently walk through and with most traffic removed it will not feel asafe place to go after dark when deserted. The area is already empty at certain times and acomplete lack of traffic will can only enhance this, potentially creating a space that local residentswill be fearful to enter, which is the complete opposite of the proposed intent.

Disruption; The proposal has no mention of the disruption to local residents if the proposal wastaken forward. Local residents would be living with the disruption for many months, with roadclosures, dirty roads, potential night working, disruption to our services and contractors vans etc.parking locally. The university have not addressed how they would support local residents throughthis major disruption.

Benefit to Local Residents: The proposal provides benefit for the university, but a lot of disbenefitsto the local community. Closure of a road, loss of parking, changes to traffic, disruption and noguarantee of any use of the space once completed, especially out of term time. We consider thatthe use of the term "public realm" is misleading as we are not convinced that this proposal willprovide a public realm.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to this proposed scheme.

There are many objections to this proposal from the University. The principal one is the closure ofWoodlands Road and the long-term increase in danger to pedestrians and cyclists bydisplacement of vehicles from Woodland Road to the adjoining roads. Particular problems are thepinch points on St Michael's Park, St Michaels Hill and pinch points for buses.

A second is is the "land grab" by the University in trying to create a campus. The most egregiousexample of this is the dishonest labelling, in the University's publicity material, of Highbury Villasas part of the University campus area. It is not part of the University campus and never has been.

The third is the years of building work and disruption. The proposal has no mention of thedisruption to local residents and how the university will deal with this and support local residents.We're already living with the very inconvenient closure of the road at the bottom of St MichaelsPark which makes life difficult but at least we have 2 way traffic on Tyndall Avenue. If that was oneway, life would be hell.And local residents are again already living with the many contractor vans parking in St MichaelsPark working for the Kier site at the Senate Building. Parking in St Michaels Park and OsbourneVillas is full by 8am, resulting in the overspill coming into Highbury Villas which is a situation thatwould be repeated with this proposal. We're living and would be living with the disruption for manymonths, with road closures, dirty roads, potential night working, disruption to our services and

contractors vans etc. parking locally. The university have not addressed how they would supportlocal residents through this major disruption. together The ongoing building work by the Universityalready causes significant parking problems locally because the contractors' vans occupy themajority of the parking spaces to the detriment of local businesses and also local residents.Although the University says that they should not do that, they take absolutely no steps to ensurecompliance. The problem is dumped on the residents.

Parking: The proposed loss of parking spaces in the scheme which is a large % of the parkingspaces within the current area where parking is already under huge pressure is unacceptable.This proposal will add to the already huge pressure on local parking, despite the KingsdownResident Parking Scheme, especially outside of the RPZ hours. Pressure on local parking will onlyincrease, becoming intolerable for local residents, who already fear to move their cars in case theycan't park when they return. Local residents frequently drive down both Tyndalls Avenue and StMichaels Park and the existing car parking spaces are always full during working hours, eveningsand weekends so where will these cars go? There is no protection from the local RPZ. There isnothing in the proposals about how the university will address this issue and ensure local residentswill be able to park in an area with much reduced parking.

St Michaels Park and the Closure of Woodlands Road in front of the new building: The proposal touse of St Michaels Park as the new road for all car traffic is not proven. This area is already verycongested, especially at school drop off and pick up times. And while the suggestion of someS106 planning gain to improve St Michaels Hill is useful, the amount of money proposed is tinycompared with the work needed (as we've explored in the past through the Highbury Placescheme). If Tyndalls Avenue and part of Woodlands Road is closed to cars traffic, this congestionwill be exacerbated.

We're also very concerned about the closure of Woodlands Road. This will create a rat run downSt Michaels Park especially during peak hours and create more traffic on St Michaels Hill as thetraffic survey shows with increases of 48% or over 150 cars in the morning peak expected. This isalso at a time when there is an increase in pedestrians with schools and people walking to thecentre, university and UBHT at the beginning of the day.

Woodlands Road Closure: As local residents, the closure of Woodlands Road and creating ineffect a road in two halves, creates very difficult access for local residents to Highbury Villas,especially between the triangle and St Michaels Hill. Not being able to turn right from WhiteladiesRoad onto Tyndall Park road doesn't help our access. We also have a concern that the universityhave only considered the proposed closure and pedestrianisation of this space. No other optionsappear to have been considered and certainly none are proposed for consultation. There is noclarity about whether any consideration been given to creating a shared space (such as beensuccessful in many European cities) which would allow a flow through of access for localresidents. Woodlands Road and Tyndalls Avenue are both public roads and need to bemaintained as such, not closed off because the University wants to create some space for

students.

Safety: We are very concerned that the proposed buses and bikes space of Tyndalls Ave willmean that it will be deserted - or at least very empty of people - in the evenings, especially out ofterm time. Local residents frequently walk through and with most traffic removed it will not feel asafe place to go after dark when deserted. The area is already empty at certain times and acomplete lack of traffic will can only enhance this, potentially creating a space that local residentswill be fearful to enter, which is the complete opposite of the proposed intent.

Benefit to Local Residents: The proposal provides benefit for the university, but a lot of disbenefitsto the local community. Closure of a road, loss of parking, changes to traffic, disruption and noguarantee of any use of the space once completed, especially out of term time. We consider thatthe use of the term "public realm" is misleading as we are not convinced that this proposal willprovide a public realm.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I wish to OBJECT to this application on these grounds:

The overbearing and inappropriate design of the proposed library, which would be completely outof scale with its setting in a harmonious part of the Conservation Area, which it woulddemonstrably not 'enhance' in any way.

The size and design of the Library should be determined by what the site can acceptably andaesthetically tolerate, not to satisfy any arbitrary demand for a particular number of student places.

Secondly, the proposed alterations to traffic flows in Woodland Road and Tyndall Avenue shouldnot be considered in the same application.

While there are good arguments for encouraging foot and bicycle movements, these roadproposals will make vehicle access to and from parts of Kingsdown and Cotham unacceptablyawkward. More recent City Council plans adding cycle lanes and further restricting turning at localjunctions require all the traffic aspects to be considered separately outside this application.

The University must again be reminded that they do not have a 'campus' in this part of the city,and their attempted annexation of existing public space cannot be justified.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to the proposed changes on the following grounds:1) The proposed road closure at Woodlands Rd will divert traffic down Elton Road in between theBristol Grammer Infants School and the main school grounds. This will increase pollution next tothe playgrounds and significantly increase the risk of road traffic accidents. There have alreadybeen plenty of near misses as buses drive up the narrow road trying to squeeze past a line ofqueuing cars going down it. In these situations the buses must drive on the pavements,endangering the children. It is common for cars to queue the length of Elton Road during rushhours and cause traffic on Woodlands Road and Tyndalls Avenue to also queue. This will increaseas more cars are pushed down Elton Road, again increasing pollution in the local area.2) Bristol university is a city university and should not be able to close public roads. The universityalready has a lot of beautiful grounds in which students can relax and socialise. Woodlands Roadshould remain open to the traffic of all sorts including cars.2) The proposed building is in no way in keeping with the local area. It is significantly larger thanthe current building, blocking light to neighbours, and has no architectural features in common withthem.3) The environmental impact of demolishing and rebuilding the library does not appear to havebeen considered. I'm no specialist but I struggle to see how demolishing a building can be betterfor the environment than enhancing its environmental characteristics from the inside. The NationalTrust and English Heritage have all successfully upgraded their properties without demolition.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

We're here again! University of Bristol don't ever give up. It feels like a war of attritionthey have with BCC, environmentalists, the Department of Transport and most importantly thelocal community to bully through their plans year after year without ever seemingly to consider thehorrendous effects living in a rolling building site is for the local community. Noise, pollution,countless single occupancy large white vans clogging up the limited RPZ places all day long,extended road closures or half closures, diverted traffic, heavy goods vehicles pounding the roads,skips left at the side of roads blocking footpaths - it's an endless year on year building site inKingsdown with no give back or consideration for the loss of the quality of life for the localcommunity. No, UoB are determined without a break to steam roll through their ever increasingexpansion and encroachment on our lives and our public highways. All this it seems whilst alsostruggling with ever increasing financial debt? Shouldn't this be a time for consolidation notexpansion?

It is also despicable that UoB have chosen to resubmit this application after a particularly difficultperiod of isolation and lockdown for our communities due to Covid 19. We're all a little battle wearybecause of that sudden jolt in our lives and routines and on our back foot for many reasons - somepeople just keeping their heads above water - when some of our community who have been ableto have taken a much needed break are away and missed this deadline or for those who are stillhere there is a definite feeling of objection fatigue. This timing seems like a weapon to knock outobjection. An uncaring, unsympathetic tactic. This is the real character of UoB.

We have lived as a family of five - our children attending local schools through primary tosecondary - on St Michael's Hill by the corner of St Michael's Park since 1992 and have a very,very extensive knowledge of the life, the footfall and the traffic flow in this extremely congestedarea around which the UoB operate. Yet not unsurprisingly local residents have never been invitedfor a direct consultation by the UoB nor indeed the out of towner architects/designers who comeup with these unthought through vanity projects for UoB.

How many times has this scheme been turned down? Three at the last count! Doesn't that in itselfmake the inadequacies and the opposition to this UoB vanity project manifest? It was always illthought through and lacked full consultation and grounded practicality. It feels like an idea on theback of a fag packet. The disruption and chaos in our streets during the implementation of theproposed plan and catastrophic effect afterwards has not been identified nor considered.

This plan has little changed since the UoB put in their last application for this development. Whyare they allowed to keep coming back without substantially improved development and evidentialresearch to counter all the disputed elements to the previous application? It's like being in a Kafkanovel or Groundhog Day. When will it end?

It's still a land grab of a public highway. Kingsdown is not a campus for the UoB. They want it to be- they even have banners around the area emblazoned with an architect's vision of the new libraryand the closed roads of the land grab area beautifully, pictorially imagined beckoning students ofthe future to the new campus - except UoB don't have the planning permission for such a projectand it demonstrates the supreme arrogance and careless dismissal of the process and theopinions of those of us who vehemently oppose any more encroachment or needless developmentby UoB. Enough. Just stop.

Closing Woodland Road for a matter of a few meters so called public space will create acatastrophic effect on traffic circulating in this area. Not just at peak times of the day with schooltraffic but throughout the day because this permanent closure will force more traffic onto StMichael's Hill which is already a heavy thoroughfare for through traffic and local businesses andhospital traffic searching for parking spaces - with extremely narrow pinches in the road by ParkStreet and on to the junction with Tyndall's Park Road. At the end of lectures the road is teamingwith students often spilling off the pavements walking to the next lecture or queuing to buy coffeeor food from the many outlets on St Michael's Hill. It's already dangerous and pollution from trafficis high - more traffic will only exacerbate the problem.

This coupled with the new cycle lanes on Park Row and Marlborough Street is a disaster waitingto happen. To accommodate a very short distance of cycle path BCC has taken away one trafficlane where there was two leaving a hopelessly choked traffic light system at the bottom of StMichael's Hill where it joins Horfield Road and Park Row even worse than it was already. Thesejunctions are currently a grid lock vehicle point at peaks times and leaves cars, trucks, buses andvans queuing back up St Michael's Hill waiting for the lights to let them onto Horfield Road, which

also backs up, onto Park Row. That pinch point with one lane less on Park Row and MarlboroughStreet will increase those tail backs and make queuing stationary vehicle's exhaust emissionspollute the atmosphere shared by hospital staff, patients and visitors, schoolchildren, localresidents on their way to work or the shops who's daily journeys taken them past these road pointsat the same peak times. Doesn't this defeat the point of the green credentials of the cycle lanes?Whoever thought this new cycle lane was a good idea doesn't live in this area and hadn'tconducted a thorough road traffic survey before lockdown to see if it was a robust proposal. Hasanyone seen, as I have witnessed, emergency services trying to get up and down those roadsnow crippled by the new cycle lanes? It will prove unsafe for cyclists and pedestrians and vehicledrivers alike - just look where cars are pulling in outside the BRI entrance right across the cyclist'spath. It's dangerous and I can see road rage being a problem with these new traffic changes. Ihave driven, cycled and walked this course for 28 years so I speak this warning from theexperience of those years. Just tonight even at 20.30 there was congested traffic where the newcycle lanes have been introduced on Park Row. If Woodland Road is closed in this steal of apublic highway by UoB it will seriously increase traffic flow on St Michael's Hill as the only otherthrough road and in turn cause a potentially unsafe and polluted environment to develop.

The size of the proposed library will significantly reduce light to the surrounding area and from theback of our property and those alongside ours severely restrict the view to the hills and skybeyond Ashton Park creating an ugly, restrictive horizon. UoB have already built many tall andlight sucking buildings in the area over the past two decades this is just one too many and noteven a design that one can marvel at. It's a squarish bloated box.

The RPZ in this area of Kingsdown is already challenged by too few parking spaces due to thenumber of permits allotted to UoB, the hospitals, city wide work van permits and local businesseswhich makes it nigh on impossible for local residents to repark their car if moved during the day.These proposed plans will take away even more parking spaces which for local residents is a flashpoint. In tandem with the expected increase of traffic on St Michael's Hill and general diversionscaused by the closure of Woodland Road I can foresee high levels of stress and anger being asymptom.

Every time these proposals are submitted for approval we have to yet again write our objections tothem. It's exhausting living next to this bullish leviathan of an organisation who it seems to us onlyever takes and never gives back. Please also read our objections from this address on StMichael's Hill to the last time this proposal was submitted. They are still very pertinent to these so-called new proposals. I have included them below with dates.

Lynda and Andy HaySt Michael's Hill residents

Previous objection re UoB plans for Hawthorns and Woodland Road written on 25/02/20

This is the second time the University of Bristol (UoB) has submitted plans for their proposed newlibrary on Woodland Road. It is in conjunction with their plans to create a 'Public Realm' betweenthis new library and the Senate House by closing Woodland Road at the junction with Perry Roadand Tyndall Avenue causing huge disruption to the road network in this community to serve onlytheir own ever increasing building programme in this area and surmounts to no more than a landgrab of public owned roads and pavements. It is a vanity project which has no give back to thelocal community apart from offering us yet another coffee bar in an area which is already adornedwith them.

This is also at a time when the UoB is in considerable mounting debt yet still wishing to extend itsfootprint throughout the city with ever growing student numbers. It is a business risk to promoteitself to students of the future and does not consider the inappropriateness of this ugly designplonked into our neighbourhood environment.

UoB's initial plans for the new library were rejected in a previous submission and it is now back onthe table with very little meaningful difference. It's still too large a building at road level incomparison to neighbouring buildings - and against the skyline - and completely out of place in aConservation Area.

My family have lived on St Michael's Hill very close to the current UoB library since 1992 and arewell used to the UoB pushing for an 'iconic building' to profile the UoB to the city. It's not a campusUniversity which they are clearly trying to create, it is an institution which is part of the fabric of theliving and breathing city conurbation shared with a public and a neighbourhood it has shown scantregard for during the many years of their continuously rolling building development programmeand the disruption it causes not to mention the downside to the quality of life this creates.

The local community is not given a voice in the UoB's deliberations and when we try, as in thepublic 'consultation' meeting organised by UoB at Beacon House on 01/10/19 we are dismissedquite openly as irksome naysayers whose opinions are smirked at by patronising UoB officials ortheir consultant professionals. Local residents seem to matter little in the UoB's progress forward.

Our house on St Michael's Hill has a vista to the rear with a wide panoramic view which includesthe Clifton Suspension Bridge and Ashton Park beyond. It's one of the reasons which drew us tobuy the house. This new proposed library building is of the size which will considerably obfuscatethis view with its clumsy square design nearly three times the height of the existing buildings onthe same footprint. This is not about creating a new library space it is about creating a self-aggrandising obelisk in a part of the city which is totally unsuited to such a large edifice.

There are undoubtedly better options for a new library to consider without the need for suchgrandiose plans. Why don't UoB include the local community in the initial thinking for this? My real

worry is that the two plans are so conjoined that should this new library building be given the greenlight that the closure of Woodland Road and the creation of the flawed 'Public Realm' willautomatically receive a similar green light.

You have to live in the immediate community to understand that this is a wholly inappropriate anddisruptive planning application for both the new library and the proposed 'Public Realm'.

I totally object to this project.

Lynda HaySt Michael's Hill resident

Previous objection re UoB plans for Hawthorns and Woodland Road written on 25/02/20

I attended the public meeting re this development proposal by UoB at Beacon House on 01/10/19.I asked several questions to the UoB spokesperson and the architects/engineers of this projectand didn't get any satisfactory responses or answers. The event was called a consultation - it wasanything but - the audience was spoken at in the form of a presentation for almost the entireallotted time and only allowed a limited opportunity to ask questions and enter into a dialectic withthe above mentioned professionals behind this planning application - which at this point was forboth the changes to the 'Public Realm' including the closure of Woodland Road and the proposed'New Library' after demolishing the Hawthorns.

It felt very much as a participant in that meeting that the UoB considered this proposal already adone deal - "so put up and shut up - this is what we're going to do regardless - we've been sentback to the drawing board once before and this is now it" - that was definitely the perception.

These far reaching and impactful plans and the way UoB has gone about introducing them areexactly the kind of arrogant and self-aggrandising project my family have become used to fromUoB over the past 27 years. We are immediate neighbours to UoB living on St Michael's Hill nearthe junction with St Michael's Park. During this time the University has never in any of its manybuilding projects truly considered the impact on their neighbours or wider local community - nogive back for all the incredible disruption to our lives which their self-focused developments havecaused.

The UoB building developments have been going on for many, many years without a break. Workcontractors's white vans, mostly driven by one person, have taken over our RPZ parking spacesduring this time without any thought from UoB to consider the stressful impact that has on localresidents. This coupled with UoB and hospital staff being given parking permits means that we areon the front line of diminishing parking opportunities - it is a daily cause of anxiety when as a localresident there is nowhere to park if you dare to use your car for a necessary journey - and now

First bus company are considering cutting back our bus route service too! These new proposalsremove even more RPZ spaces then are available now. Real local residents are just not beenconsidered with this regard. We've been overlooked. And now this current planning applicationpromises more years of misery and disruption as a local resident. Our quality of life is not beingconsidered in the UoB's drive to ever increase their footprint on local publicly owned land.

Having lived on St Michael's Hill since 1992 I have a very sound knowledge of the area and howfootfall and traffic flows around the network of roads. This is critical when the school runs are inoperation - particularly those to Bristol Grammar School which even without the proposed roadclosure causes considerable congestion and delay in the morning - cars idling in queues waiting inor to get on to Perry Road is not green. Why doesn't the UoB if it really purports to have a greenpolicy actively discourage or stop students and staff driving cars into the city centre - that would bea positive move forward? It's worked in Oxford, Cambridge, Nottingham, Bournmouth and othercities. It's one of Bristol City Council's key objective to keep cars away from the centre and yet theUoB is one of the most offending organisations in this respect.This latest proposed project is perhaps their most preposterous to date. It's tantamount to a landgrab from the public realm for what seems mostly another vanity project without fully consideringthe enormous impact the road closure will have on traffic flow in this already severely constrictedroad network and traffic heavy area. The UoB are trying to turn Kingsdown into a University OfBristol Campus under the veil of progress. It isn't it's a thriving city community which UoB aretrying to dominate.

The proposed closure of Woodland Road will cause a substantial increase in traffic using StMichael's Hill in both directions which already has critical pinch areas where traffic builds up at keytimes of the day; the junction with St Michael's Hill and Horfield Road leading to the traffic lightswith Perry Road; the junction with St Michael's Hill and Tyndall's Park Road. There is a verydangerous chicane, a narrowing of the road, where St Michael's Hill meets with St Paul's Roadand at critical times of the day this is heavily populated by students using the extremely narrowpavements often blocked by black bins which haven't been put away by the student occupants ofthe many HMO houses in Kingsdown.

Cars, buses and trucks (some very large) currently put St Michael's Hill under considerable stresscausing damage to the road surface (many deep potholes and cracks) and pollution. The closureof Woodland Road is only going to increase these problems and I have no doubt will lead to apotentially dangerous thoroughfare. The amount of extra traffic and speeding cars on the hill whichI have witnessed over the past weeks since St Michael's Park has been closed - for more currentUoB building work - has been noticeable as has the morning work/school drop-off stress.

There is a very high chance of grid lock when the extra traffic on St Michael's Hill increases due tothe closure of Woodland Road. I doubt any robust traffic observation or survey has beenundertaken by UoB - there certainly wasn't when they put their last planning application to use StMichael's Park as a bus route and close Tyndall's Avenue. St Michael's Park is clearly unsuitable

for buses turning in and out of St Michael's Hill or Woodland Road - it didn't take a great deal ofintelligence or observation to see that was a non-starter and the Dept of Transport roundly agreed.It doesn't fill one with the greatest of confidence in UoB's ability in checking the details or ensuringthe thoroughness of any of their plans.

Why doesn't the UoB if it really purports to have a green policy to actively discourage or stopstudents and staff driving cars into the city centre - that would be a positive move forward. It'sworked in other cities - Oxford, Cambridge, Nottingham, Bournmouth and others. It's a Bristol CityCouncil objective to keep cars away from the centre and yet the UoB is one of the most offendingorganisations in this respect.

I strongly object to this UoB's planning application.

Andy HaySt Michael's Hill resident

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I OBJECT to the revised road proposals i.e. the one way system proposed for Tyndall Avenue andclosure of Woodland Road. Kingsdown already has very restricted access for residents using theircars and service vehicles because of existing one way roads and restrictions on turns e.g.Tyndall's Park Road onto Whiteladies road. The proposed B.C.C. changes for the St. Michael's Hill, Perry Road junction, will result in Kingsdown residents having to make long diversions to accesstheir properties, causing increased pollution and use of narrow streets unsuitable for increasedtraffic flow, in particular from St. Michael's Park onto St. Michael's Hill where there is restictedvisibility and potential risk of accidents. There will also be increased levels of pollution potentiallyaffecting the the local nursery school. Travelling to and from west Bristol will be particularlyproblematic and will not only have a significant impact on Kingsdown residents but also patientsand visitors needing to access The Maternity Hospital, Oncology Unit and the B.R.I. It isappropriate to encourage active travel by bike and foot where possible but this is not alwayspossible for elderly residents of Kingsdown or those with disabilities.In making these proposals The University again demonstrates a contempt for the needs of thoseliving in this residential area of Bristol .The roads are not, and should not be, part of a 'campus':they are public roads for the use of all and should continue to be open and accessible.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

I object to the current proposals. The proposed road closures will divert more traffic onto St Michaels Hill, which at present is very busy at times. This and the works traffic associatedwith these changes will reduce the quality of life for the local residents/

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

This development is totally out of keeping with the surrounding area and should not beallowed.The university has a responsibility to keep the local area to a high standard, and well kept. Theconstruction traffic would cause a big issue for the local residents and they have only recentlycompleted a lot of building work in this area

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

The building is not in keeping with the buildings around it. The pedestrianising of thestreet will force extra traffic down Elton Road adding risk to the school children crossing the street.The long term dust and debris and noise will be dangerous and distracting for the children at theinfant school on Elton road. The height of the building will block out the light to non universityproperty.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

Hi everyone. For those that are new to the group, the university are planning on somemajor changes to the surrounding BGS area. They were due to go to planning in Jan but pulledout at the last minute. Enclosed are the new updated plans.

1. The Hawthorns building at the top of Elton Road is due to be demolished and replace d withthree buildings on top of each other, all at different angles - the only way I can think to describe it.The building is going to be the same height as the sports hall building across the road - so high -disproportionately higher than all other buildings around, including the GH.

2. Look at the traffic area. The uni are planning to close the top road and make it more campusbased. As such all traffic will be pushed down Elton Road.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

We have many objections to these proposals especially regarding the students of BristolGrammar school. The diverted traffic and building work will lead to increased pollution (both noiseand air) and risk of accidents around the school. We must remember that the university is a cityuniversity not a campus one and shouldn't shut public roads when it has plenty of beautifulgardens for student's recreational use. The proposed building is also not in keeping with itssurroundings. We really hope that these plans are not accepted and that the bigger picture isconsidered here.

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

Having read through the Combined Response of the City Design Group, I would like to add some further comments to my previous submission (5 March 2020).The detailed Combined Response makes it clear that the proposed new building is not exclusively or even primarily intended as a new library, but as a space for live performance, exhibitions and interaction between members of the public and university staff. This is a laudable aim. But the title of the project should give greater prominence to this broad aim. Nowhere does the document mention in any detail the present library for the Arts and Social Sciences, or what is to happen to it. It is an ugly building from an ugly period of architecture; but it has nevertheless proved its functional effectiveness. If it is now to be discarded, the University needs to explain what will be its future function. It also needs to explain why this building is no longer viable as a library in a digital age.The case for new space for printed texts and journals, in my view, has not been made convincingly. As an expert in the use of digital technologies in Arts research and teaching, I am confident that the rapid progress of digitisation in the near future will overtake the need for physical space. Much is made of the special collections. Here, I can also speak with some expertise. I was a Lecturer in the Drama Department in the University during the 1960s and 1970s when the Theatre Collection (launched by Professor Glynne Wickham) was expanded from its inception in 1951. It has since gone from strength to strength and does indeed deserve a new home. But extensive collections of archival material in American universities, and, amongst others, the V&A, the Garrick Club, All Souls Oxford, Chatsworth, the National Archives and the British

Library are still the main centre of interest for scholars. Hence, the notion of building a large exhibition space centred primarily on the Theatre Collection and one other special collection does seem somewhat overambitious. The design of the building, with its vast atrium and huge concrete staircases, is reminiscent of the South Bank development in London during the 1970s, in particular the National Theatre. And it is as dated in its conception as these earlier buildings now look. In addition, the brutal concrete mass of the building is completely at odds with the surrounding cityscape. In contrast, the new Humanities Building, situated between Tyndalls Park Road and Woodland Road, is a splendid example of modern architecture which blends well with its surroundings in terms of overall mass and surface detail.Nothing I have read in the Combined Response has persuaded me to revise my earlier judgement: namely, that this proposed new building is a monumental and brutal structure, which seeks to undermine its brutality with quirky offset additions in a contrived and unsuccessful attempt at post-modern playfulness. Its huge mass is completely at odds with the architectural scale and idiom of its surroundings and is hubristic in both concept and proposed execution. At present, there is an unprecedented crisis in funding for local and national government; for the performing, visual and plastic arts; and for universities. In view of this, I would urge the University of Bristol to withdraw this current proposal and return in due course, when funding streams are more stable, with a more modest proposal which respects the architectural scale and idiom of its surroundings. The overall aim of this new building is entirely laudable; but the proposed format and structure for delivering its aim is at present deeply flawed.

David ThomasProfessor EmeritusTheatre, Performance, Cultural PolicyUniversity of Warwick

on 2020-08-26   OBJECT

Dear Bristol City Council

You kindly notified me of changes to the above proposed application.

Please note that my objections raised in a previous comment including those in relation to the increase in traffic in a road which bisects the Bristol Grammar School site remain. The danger this proposal presents to the health and safety of pupils, staff and visitors to the site is unacceptably high and the council for the council to approve these plans as they stand would be reckless.

Yours faithfully.

Catherine Bell

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I am afraid that I have to object with the demolition of the Hawthorns building and therebuilding on the site and the new road lay out.

The new buildings as they stand so no fit into the surrounding area, or any building that has beenbuilt by the university in the last five years and there have been many. It it is large, garish, and willblock out much light to the surrounding area.

The traffic proposals are also not in keeping with the rest of Bristol. There is a school that issurrounded by University and Elton Road, as such all traffic would be directed around the school,using it as a roundabout. This will almost doubly the amount of traffic going down Elton Road,which would surely bring into question the councils responsibility to safe guarding the childrenwithin the school, should the proposals be allowed to go ahead.

The university is not a campus based university it is an inner city one as as such should really betreated like one.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to this proposal.

I am concerned regarding the loss of Student accommodation. Kingsdown has a lot of HMOs nowand would not benefit from any more. When I moved here I had student HMOs next door now I amsurrounded by them.

The closure of roads would further impact the local community. My partner is disabled so althoughI live in Kingsdown I need a car. I do not see how the road closures would benefit anyone but theuniversity. The surrounding roads are already busy so forcing more traffic into them would onlyincrease pollution and congestion.

The scale and design of the buildings do not fit with the surrounding area and would appear tomonopolise, again impacting on the local community.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

This proposal is out of keeping with almost every other building in the surrounding area- it is colossal, clumsy and unattractive. It distracts from, and dwarfs, the surrounding architecture.The building will not enhance the local area and it will not benefit the local community. It will beused almost exclusively by the University's transient population, for the benefit of that transientpopulation. Local people will suffer great inconvenience and will see no upside.It will create serious traffic problems during the construction phase and the traffic plan for thefuture means that the Bristol Grammar School site will become a traffic island. Given thatconstruction will be required on a massive scale in the middle of a large number of Universitybuildings and a school educating children from age 5 to 18, the potential for serious injury to thosein the vicinity is very real. I have seen nothing in the planning application which suggests that theUniversity really understands how the roads surrounding the proposed site are used by smallchildren and young people.I have also not seen anything of any reassurance about the impact the redevelopment will have onair quality in this area. Bristol has severe problems with air quality, and is in breach of legislation inthat respect, as the Council will be only too aware. A huge construction project involving heavyconstruction vehicles will only make this worse.Please reject this application and encourage development on a scale which is appropriate to itslocation and respectful of its neighbours.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Dear Sir / Madam,

As a parent of two children at Bristol Grammar School, I wanted to formally lodge a strongobjection to the planned development.

The core thrust of this objection relates to the impact that both the works themselves and the endproduct will have on our school and my children.

The key issues are as follows:- obstruction of natural light to classrooms- noise during construction, particularly in the context of naturally ventilated rooms in the schooland the, frankly ridiculous, proposed one quiet hour per day- health impacts given levels of dust and debris (one of my children is asthmatic)- disruption to vehicular access to the school creating traffic and parking issues- disruption to vehicular access to the area, when taken in conjunction with other proposedchanges to St Michael's Hill, Park Row and Perry Road creating traffic and parking issues- safety concerns arising from increased traffic flow along Elton Road given the amount of pupilscrossing that road at drop off times and during the day- the new buildings being out of character with the existing buildings.

I sincerely hope that this development is not allowed to proceed.

Yours faithfully,

Sarah Withers.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Despite attempts to improve the proposed changes at the Hawthorns site Iwholeheartedly object to both the rebuild and traffic changes as they currently stand.The University of Bristol is a very powerful force and economically and employs a large amount ofpeople. Its influence over the city is immense. I do not see this as valid reason to ride rough rodover the look and feel of the city also. As a chartered librarian, I am all for the development of newlibraries for public use but to create such an eyesore of a building amongst some very wellestablished, iconic Bristol buildings is not only arrogant it is unnecessary. By all means redevelopthe site but not to that extent and do it IN KEEPING PLEASE.Regarding the traffic scheme. This simply will not work. I do not know what modelling you havebeen using but it will cause untold congestion onto the Triangle, on Tyndalls Park road and mostimportantly around Bristol Grammar School. Surely the children deserve better air quality thanthat? I would sincerely question that if BGS was not a private school you would be evenconsidering creating a one way system around this school. Ultimately badly thought out and verybias towards the adult students at the University ( who really should know how to cross a road etc)than the children at BGS (who frequently cross Elton Road to get to their lessons - fine at themoment as the road is quiet in the day but it wont be if you redirect all buses and traffic down it). Ican see serious accidents and countless near misses. I am not a pessimist by any means but itwill happen - we already see it with buses on Elton Road. And all this with increased pollutionlevels. What a gift for those children and residents. At the very least I would query fundamentallythe inability to have Tyndall Avenue as two way for all traffic. The pavements are deep there.Shave them, indent the bus stops and give the road room for 2 way traffic. At least this would stop

BGS from becoming a traffic island. If you don't and refuse to recognise that this school has acommunity that travels to it (ie it is not a local catchment) then you are going to increase a lot ofstress levels for a lot of people - not least the children who may end up being late to be picked upor dropped off. NB the school has children from age 4 - 18 - little ones will want their parents theiron time - and not stuck in ridiculous traffic.if you want a nice "area" for the University students - a mass traffic jam is not going to complimentthe new library or any pedestrianisation!Please have at the forefront of your mind safeguarding of the children at BGS - their health andmental wellness will be severely effected by these changes.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Severe disruption and danger to pupils of BristolGrammar School during developmentand after completion. No consideration has apparently been taken into consideration by theuniversity on the multiple impacts this redevelopment will have on the school. Noise, dust, over-hanging cranes during building works; huge implications of road/parking re-routing for safety ofpupils, parents and staff.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

My abjection has several points, as parent who's children attend BGS, proposed planintroducing massive increase in traffic through Elton road. Pupils coming to BGS are from farareas of Bristol Somerset and other areas and they have to commute via cars so all traffic will bediverted now through road where smaller pupils are. This increase danger of accidents, increasepollution and noise pollution during day as well as massive noise pollution during demolitionconstruction of new buildings.This is plan which takes years and so full generation of students will be negatively affected by thisbuilding site.Whole plan is talking about creating safe areas for university students who are in fact adults butcompletely ignores issue of small children as young as 5 and all traffic to be diverted via road nextto their building.Secondly, this area full of historical buildings, BGS itself has beautiful main character building, notfar is Bristol museum etc, all these buildings are quite low rise and new proposed developmentcreates massive visual disturbance, this Stalinist design is exactly opposite what this arerepresents.And thirdly, The road rearranging bocks parents drop of and pick ups and makes it almostimpossible to get children to school. BGS is selective school so many children have to come toschool with several bags, equipment etc and this is absolutely naive to expect that family of 2 or 3will go with 12 bags in public transport and change bus at least once . This is not local schoolwhich have pupils only from surrounding areas and as selective school every child here is highachiever.

This development is extremely backwards and ignores all neighbours in favour of University.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

These plans are hugely problematic for us as a regular person who uses this area.These roads are not just providing access for Bristol University but are also providing access forstudents at school. Already the university students treat the area as though it is their campusexclusively and are often walking in the road. This plan suggests that this area becomes moreexclusive to Bristol University when actually the top of Elton Road and surrounds are an importantenvironment for school children. It doesn't feel especially inclusive of the students, many are smallinfant children who will find themselves in the midst of an established university campus. At themoment the access to these roads means that at least there is some diversity of people who useit. As parents at the school we will now need to walk, cycle or drive through the university campusto get to the school when these are public roads. It risks ghettoising the area and feeling as thoughit is the domain of students. Further it will force any access and traffic to the bottom end of QueensRoad which is already feeding traffic from Whiteladies Road. This doesn't feel inclusive of theschool's community and for these reasons I object to these plans.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to this application because of the impact that the proposed changes will have onthe members of the public who are not part of the university community. This applies to residentsbut also to the children, young people, teachers, parents and staff of BGS. The school communitywill suffer in a wide range of ways, not least in terms of access to the schools site. A significantproportion of students are taken to school by car and so the increase in traffic in the surroundingarea will have negative impact on other commuters and the local community and residents. Theproposed changes will lead to the area having the feel of a 'campus' which will be unfairLyimposed on other users of the area; residents, local businesses and members of the schoolcommunity at BGS. local businesses will surely suffer as a consequence of the area becomingrecognised as a student area and thereby becoming seen as a homogenous self containedcommunity, Into which 'outsiders' have no reason to venture. Given the location of the proposedchange this could potentially fracture the city centre along lines of potentially problematic divide,isolating the kingsdown community by creating a 'campus' between st Michaels Hill and amultitude of shops, cafes and other services. Bristol University students benefit from theexperience of being part of a wider community, helping them to have a more informedunderstanding of wider social and cultural experiences, enriching their education and their futurepotential. The proposed changes will not be in their own interests as they will serve to isolate themfrom neighbouring communities and experiences.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal. As a parent with two children at BGS I am concernedabout their safety at drop off and pick up times as well as during the day. Pupils regularly cross theroad between the buildings and an increase in cars, cyclists and pedestrians will make this verydangerous. This is already a busy and congested area, with limited space on pavements and forparking. Forcing the traffic down Elton road and pedestrianising the area at the top of Elton roadwill make this worse. It is noisy, polluted and busy already.

The only people this proposal is benefiting is the university, there will be no benefits to the localresidents. This area is not a university campus.

The building is out of keeping with the local area, blocking light into the school and is too big

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I strongly object to this development. There is absolutely no regard to the aesthetics ofthe area - the current plans are not at all sensitive to the period of the area. More importantly, theUniversity-centric plans haven't considered the detrimental impact this will have on others whoshare the space (school children, staff and parents and local residents) in terms of pollution, safetyand loss of light and noise (1 hour of quiet is totally ridiculous - an acknowledgement of disruption(yes) but an effective solution (of course not!)

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to the traffic flow suggested by the plans.The traffic coming up university road has no option but to go down woodland road or Elton road.This is a significant amount of traffic and the woodland road exit is busy at all times.This system will send significantly more traffic down Elton road, through the middle of BristolGrammar school as it is cutting out 2 roads for the traffic to take as alternatives.I do not think the one way direction on Tyndall avenue is appropriate for this reason. If it must beone way - I would suggest it runs the other way ie from woodland road to st Michael's hill howevermy preference woudl be to remain as both directions to reduce as much as possible the increasedtraffic down Elton road from closing woodland road.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to this plan which will put residents and pupils of Bristol Grammar School at adisadvantage.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I strongly object to these proposals.The new buildings will be completely out of keeping with other university buildings And thesurrounding area - they large and ugly.I am also very concerned about the impact to traffic and especially what this means for the nearbyschool, especially in terms of safety for the children (from age 4-18) that attend there. the trafficwill be directed around the school and poses a huge risk for everyone there. The proposals shouldnot be allowed to go ahead in my view

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

The revised road proposals including the one way working on Tyndall Avenue andclosure of Woodland Road need to be taken into account in terms of the wider BCC trafficproposals for the wider area. Kingsdown already has very restricted access for residents usingtheir cars because of existing one way roads and restrictions on turns at junctions eg TyndallsPark Road with Whiteladies Road. With the imminent changes at the St Michael's Hill junction withPerry Road, and the proposed closures of Woodland Road and Cotham Hill it will be extremelydifficult for Kingsdown residents to access their properties by car without long diversions throughnarrow streets unsuitable for increased traffic flows. Travelling to and from west Bristol will beparticularly problematic. Whilst it is to be applauded to encourage active travel where possible, it isnot always possible for older people and others with mobility issues nor for those who have totravel further for work etc. The University is acting again as a bad neighbour with these proposals.The roads are not part of a campus; they are public roads for the use of all.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Health concerns re additional traffic pollution and the impact on Bristol Grammar Schoolpupils.Insufficient consideration has been given to the impact the traffic proposals would have inconjunction with Bristol's proposed diesel vehicle ban. Elton Road will become a useful westboundroute for diesel vehicles skirting the proposed zone.

Health concerns re dust in conjunction with a pandemic and the impact on Bristol Grammar Schoolpupils.The Construction Dust Assessment states:"it is not possible to guarantee that the dust mitigation measures will be effective all of the time"Dust may cause children at BGS to cough. This may lead to a child thinking they have Covid-19symptoms, and being sent home with a corresponding education impact. Or worse, a child whohas a cough due to Covid-19 may attribute it to dust, and remain at school, spreading the virus.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

The plan for this building is out of step with the local school with whom the area isshared. The plan to begin pedestrianising the road, whilst commendable, is selfish to say the least- forcing endless amounts of traffic down Elton Road and nearby. It completely disregards thesafety and well-being of the students and pupils as young as 5 years old. The structure itself willloom large over playgrounds and increase footfall into a largely congested area during key pointsof the day. I implore the council to look closely at how this structure and infrastructure changes willImpact Bristol Grammar School and local traffic thoroughfares before progressing.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

This structure is far too big and not in keeping/proportion with the other buildingsnearby. It will cause loss of light to buildings and neighbours for many areas surrounding it.

The changes to traffic layout will force traffic down Elton road and this will cause difficulties anddanger to pedestrians there.

The building work will have a massive impact on the environment and will cause noise anddisruption to local residents.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to the proposals by Bristol University including the demolition of the Hawthornsand the erection of the new proposed building. The proposed appearance of the building, its heightand size are not at all in keeping with the area. The proposed building will affect the light ofneighbouring buildings, particularly the primary school sections of Bristol Grammar School in itsestablished position on Elton Road.

The proposed construction and timescale of the building will create much noise and other pollutionin the area. Again, particularly for the young school children who are just over the road. It seemslike no consideration has been given to them.

The proposed redirection of the roads will redirect all traffic down Elton Road increasing pollutionand creating safety risks in the area. Elton Road runs between the various Bristol GrammarSchool Buildings, where children aged as young as four are crossing during the day. It effectivelycreates a roundabout around the school! Why would the planners even consider creating acommuter road around a large pre-existing school? It will endanger the health and lives of somany children.

The creation of the "square" will also take away valuable parking in the area.

It will lead to increased financial burden on the council as many parents will choose to removetheir children from an independent eduction at Bristol Grammar, increasing pressure on schools in

Bristol.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Your proposal will force more traffic down Elton road and this is increasing the risk ofharm to child at BGS. This is not taking safety into consideration.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

Please, please don't do this. It is so out of keeping with the beautiful buildings and thefeel of this part of clifton. I work at Bristol Grammar School and my daughter is in the junior schoolthere. This structure would not only look awful, the traffic issues it would make areincomprehensible. Not just during the construction but also after. There are 1400 children at theschool and traffic is already difficult, this will just make it worse and dangerous. The structures arenot in keeping with the history of the area and i feel it would be detrimental to Clifton as a whole.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I strongly object to the above proposals on the following grounds:-1. The safeguarding of our children will be severely impacted by the increased traffic funnellingthrough Elton road ( the children need to cross the road throughout the day to reach differentlessons) and using the school like a roundabout. The increase in heavy goods traffic will definitelypose a risk to the children who walk to school.2. The increased noise from the building works, dust and air quality will pose a huge threat to theschool and local community. 5 years is a huge inconvenience.3. The design of the new development is not sympathetic to the surrounding beautiful Victorianarchitecture.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I feel that BGS Childrens health and safety are not being considered in this proposal.The trafic is going to increase down Elton road.The dust and works trafic will cause not only a environmental problem but the noise of largebuilding work will be terrible for childrens ability to concentrate.Much more consideration of children needs to take place.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

This development is disastrous for all the children at Bristol Grammar School. There area number of reasons.The development will cause so much disruption to the access to the school and significantlyincrease the traffic pollution around the school.It is proposed that this development will take 5 years to complete with serious noise and dustpollution which will have an extremely adverse effect on children's health and education.The size of the finished building is totally out of proportion to the other buildings surrounding it. Oncompletion it will totally dominate the whole area and completely spoil the current historic area.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to the proposed plans for these reasons.1 - The demolition of a building which is in keeping with all those surrounding it with noconsideration of including it within a design. A partial demolition could be considered allowing forthe required improvement s the university feel they need but keeping the historical buildingfrontage. One local example is the 1542 theatre at BGS which shows how a modern building canbe incorporated into the old.2 - The proposed plans have a significant increase in windows which will overlook the playgroundof a junior school impacting on the safeguarding of the children and their rights to a private life andan education.3 - The aim of the site is to bring more students of the university into the area. This is not beingconsidered with the amount of extra noise it will bring and demand on the road networks andpublic transport as well as the BGS chool traffic which will be impacted on as a result of thesechanges. A test has not been carried out to assess the community impact these changes couldhave in a busy city centre area.A smaller building proposal which would have a lesser effect could be a manageable compromise.4- COVID 19 has already shown that social distancing is required and likely to be a part of ourfuture. The scale of this building is against these principles and puts university students and BGSstudents at risk.

In summary I feel the building is too big and not in keeping with the area. This has consequenceson the road layout which would be unlikely to cope with the anticipated volume of people and

vehicles. The plans, if scaled down could be a compromise.I am also concerned that a building will be demolished leaving the area as a building site with noplan in place to replace it.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal on so many counts. The proposed design is obscenelylarge, towering over neighbouring buildings and blocking much natural light especially toclassrooms at Bristol Grammar School (including art rooms). The University may be an importantpart of Bristol's history, culture and status, but so is Bristol Grammar School (founded 1532) with acommunity of over 1200 children aged 4 to 18, plus staff and families. Its Great Hall is a wellknown local landmark, an iconic structure that sits in keeping with its neighbours, and is used bymany people in the local community for weddings, music and other events. This would be toweredover by the proposed modern building.The traffic plans are shocking, and will create so much additional traffic down the narrow EltonRoad which intersects the school, as well as causing problems around Woodland Road, and downinto and around the triangle. This will in turn create even worse air pollution (especiallyendangering children and other young people) in the area, which is already a major problem.Bristol University is not a campus university - it shares our city with the residents, and its locationin such a beautiful, dynamic and welcoming city is part of its appeal. As such, it should work as apartner in the community, and not seek to dominate or to ignore the needs of others in thesurroundings.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

I object to this proposal as a resident of Bristol and mother to children who attend localschools close to the university.

Please reconsider whether this project is even necessary - please consider the environmentalimpact of the destruction of the existing buildings and the proposed building work, in this time ofuncertainty, economic instability and climate change.

I am concerned about the proposed plans' impact on the childrens' health and wellbeing in theschool neighbouring the plans. I am concerned about the worsening traffic congestion ofneighbouring road eg Elton road.

Bristol council are currently considering plans to reduce traffic in Bristol centre includingwhiteladies road/triangle, this project is kept necessary for Bristol and has environmental James.My view is this project should be out on hold while the environmental impact, covid19 pandemicand economic impact is reviewed before it can be deemed necessary for Bristol university toundertake. Please consider saving the existing building, avoiding huge undertaking with negativeimpacts both short and long term and use the funds towards endeavours which instead improvethe environment.

on 2020-08-25   OBJECT

The proposal only consider the needs of the university and would result in an increasedvolume of traffic using Elton Road which is bordered on both sides by Bristol Grammar Schoolbuildings and would present an increased danger children and staff of the school. It would alsomean that the other public roads would not be available to the general public and would causeconsiderable difficulties to road users wishing to travel from University Road to areas such asCotham and St Michael's Hill.

This is effectively turning public roads that are funded by the tax payer to the exclusive use of theUniversity.

on 2020-08-23   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal. The proposed traffic regulations will cause increased congestion around that area, making it noisy, dirty and unsafe for my children when dropping them off at school as well as for them when walking around the site. The road that separates the junior and infants school will become increasingly unsafe for school children crossing the road. Parking spaces are already limited and congestion is bad, this will add to that.

This is a residential area for commuters, parents, and residents. It is not just a university area and the university should not be able to take over the area. It is already very overcrowded and noisy. This will add to that.

The building does not fit in with the surrounding area and is ugly and takes over the site.

on 2020-08-21   OBJECT

I am objecting to the changes to the traffic circulation proposed by this application byrestricting private vehicle access to certain parts of the area. These changes need to be taken intoconsideration in conjunction with the changes in Park Row/St Michaels Hill/Perry Road to produceimproved walking/cycling facilities in these roads.Taken together, these changes will considerably restrict the movement of traffic around the areawhich will have a significant detrimental impact on those with limited mobility who need to use theircars to access local amenities including shops, hospitals, dental practices, libraries, post officesetc

on 2020-08-16   SUPPORT

on 2020-08-14   OBJECT

The scale and design of the proposed building is completely out of character and stepwith the surrounding Victorian architecture. It dwarfs Bristol Grammar School across the road. Thedesign is totally hideous, and is yet another example of architects following their own modernisttrends. Unfortunately, the University is responsible for some of the ugliest and out-of-characterbuildings in Bristol, e.g. the Students Union building on Queens Road. It seems all the University isinterested in is "developing a new state-of-the-art library" and a "landmark building"! Clifton doesnot need another landmark building! This is yet another vanity project for the University's seniormanagement and should not be given pmanning permissin without a radical change to the design.

on 2020-08-13   SUPPORT

I'm in support of the proposal of building up a new University library on the current TheHawthorns. The new library is not only a space with library services but also a cultural centre withinternational education-minded benefiting the whole community in a more open and enlightenedway.

on 2020-08-07   SUPPORT

To Whom it may concern,I am in favour of a new University Library to be built on the site occupied by The Hawthorns,. It ismy opinion that the design of a new building will fit with the existing architecture blending old andnew together, as it is accepted that architecture is a form of art a new building will bring newexpression to the landscape of Woodland Road Tyndall Avenue and Elton Road. There are manybenefits to allowing the University of Bristol to build a new structure on this site.

An organisation that recognises and acts on the need to reduce carbon emissions.

Developing a structure that will harmonise the local landscape and environment.

Partnering with the local community to grant access to their academic collections benefitting all.

Progressive development of ideas, communities, Libraries, Education and Bristol.

I see more benefits to the City of Bristol and wider than there is to the University.

S Bridges.

on 2020-08-06   OBJECT

I am still strongly opposed to the moves by the University to form the so-called Clifton Campus. I am a resident of Kingsdown and have already strongly objected to the proposals of making a pedestrian area in Woodland Road, quite apart from building another modern building right next to the Victorian school buildings. The University wishes to reroute traffic on two of the routes for residents, namely Tyndall Ave and St Michael's Park, across to the Triangle with Cotham Hill already being one way. The council now wishes to abolish the right hand turn at the bottom of St Michael's Hill so that means that ALL traffic wanting to go west will be sent down Tyndall's Park road which is already busy with students crossing. The University have completely high-jacked our area and the council seem to give it free rein. The student numbers have increased to an unacceptable level and while they may well contribute to the economy, they certainly do not contribute to a sense of community.Christine Purvis

on 2020-07-20   SUPPORT

I support the provision of improved spaces for the preservation and display of theuniversity's Special Collections, and plans for public engagement. The design will form animpressive new landmark on the university site and is suitably responsive to the surroundingcontext, replacing a particularly ugly set of existing buildings.

on 2020-07-09   OBJECT

BGS

12 June 2020

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2. Incorrect application of the BRE guidance and BCC policy relating to DL/SL

BRE Guidance

The applicants DLSL consultant has sought to justify the identified moderate adverse VSC impacts to

the consented art classroom windows by reference to the supplementary (not alternative)

assessment taken within rooms (No-Sky Line) and the impacts to the Bartons classrooms by reference

to these occurring to secondary windows.

These windows at the Bartons are marked on the site photo below and in our view would not appear

to be secondary.

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In addition, the logic regarding acceptability is contrary to the BRE guidance flow chart, which sets

out that failure of one test is a failure overall and therefore not an either/or test.

A copy of this flow chart is shown below for reference © BRE Trust.

Fig 1: BRE DLSL decision making flow chart © BRE Trust showing default route

As can be seen, the default route based on the VSC results in themselves would lead to the

conclusion that daylighting to the classrooms is likely to be significantly affected.

Whilst this has been correctly reported (for the consented art classrooms only), as set out above, the

applicants DLSL consultant has sought to justify the VSC impacts by reference to the No-Sky Line (NSL)

results.

As can be seen from the flow chart above, the BRE does not endorse this route, clearly setting out

that both measures should be met in order to confirm that Daylighting is unlikely to be significantly

affected.

The applicants mitigating NSL assessment of the consented art classrooms includes the whole room,

which therefore benefits from including views of sky from directions other than the proposed

development, potentially understating its effect for example were the room to be internally

subdivided or if there were a need for uniform daylight.

Default

BRE route/

conclusion

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At The Bartons, two classrooms fail the VSC assessments and one of these also fails the NSL

assessment.

BCC Policy

The site falls within Clifton and is within Bristol’s “Inner Urban Area”, defined within the adopted Urban Living SPD. The Urban Living SPD contains at appendix A the following flowchart which guides

decision making related to Daylight and Sunlight.

Fig 2: BCC Daylight Sunlight flow chart: Appendix A, Urban Living SPD

This clearly states that where a scheme does not meet the default BRE guidance that in the first

instance additional design measures need to be explored and implemented to improve these.

If the default guidance is still not met, then there are a wide range of additional considerations need

to be addressed, including alternative benchmarks based on a comparative context and its current/

intended use.

None of this appears in the applicant’s DLSL report, which simply states that the reported NSL values demonstrate an acceptable impact to the art classrooms and that “secondary windows” at the Bartons mitigate the reported breaches of VSC. The report does not report the cumulative impact of

one of these classrooms also failing NSL, simply stating that the impact would not be noticeable.

Conclusion

The BRE guidance sets out that school classrooms in general have an expectation of natural light,

which would be elevated for those which teach art.

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The applicants DLSL report correctly identifies a significant adverse impact to the windows serving the

BGS art classrooms, however as set out above has not, in our view, adequately demonstrated why

this ought to be acceptable.

For the Bartons, the impacts would be considered adverse, especially where there are both VSC and

NSL impacts which exceed the default BRE guidance.

The decision-making process taken by the applicants DLSL consultant is contrary to both the BRE

guidance and BCC policy and does not satisfy either. We would not agree that the windows serving

classrooms at The Bartons are secondary, as has been demonstrated above.

Our recommendations are as follows:

• The VSC impact to the current art classrooms should also be considered/ reported in detail;

• The NSL assessments of the art classrooms should be undertaken based on a possible internal

sub-division and not being over-reliant on a view of sky from the opposite direction to the

proposals as at present;

• The affected classrooms at the Bartons should not be considered as having effects to

secondary windows and further it is clear that both VSC and NSL is not met at one location.

This classroom should also be assessed in a possible alternative arrangement, given it has

been also assessed with the benefit of light from multiple sources so does not consider any

feasible change in layout;

• The BCC decision making guide should be adhered to in addition to the default BRE

guidance in reaching conclusions as these set out a robust and objective approach to

considering the acceptability or otherwise of the reported adverse impacts.

Yours sincerely

Gregory Francis

Associate Director

Rights of Light | Daylight & Sunlight | Party Wall

T: 020 7911 2705 M: 07908 664 649

gregory.francis@avisonyoung.com

For and on behalf of Avison Young (UK) Limited

on 2020-07-09   OBJECT

on 2020-06-12   SUPPORT

The new library will be a transformative new facility for the University. It will also bereally positive for the people of Bristol.

Most particularly, making the world class cultural collections accessible for schools, members ofthe public and such life will be very beneficial.

on 2020-06-05   OBJECT

Oakfield Residents Association (ORA) is an Amenity Group representing a number ofresidents of Oakfield Clifton area, part of the Clifton Down Ward.This area is adjacent to the area containing the main University of Bristol precinct. This objectionrelates to the proposed development of the site only and does not take a view on the requirementof UoB to provide library facilities for its students, and the benefits hence with to the studentbeneficiaries. This statement is equally applicable to the museum and cultural collection facility theUoB wish to include, we note this would be of cultural value where ever it was situated within thecity and is not dependent solely on the approval of this application. We would respectfully requestBCC Planning Department to consider the majority of the application weighting based on merit andimpacts of the proposed design, not for the function of the proposed building which couldconceivably be delivered in alternative ways.

1. SPD 11 Validity. ORA consider that the Strategic Masterplan Study for the UOB, which is thebasis for the UoB SPD (SPD 11) is no longer extant; it is therefore strongly suggested that SPD 11should no longer be considered valid, and therefore not used as a basis for assessing thisplanning application. This claim is made on the following basis:

- The Strategic Masterplan (developed between 2004 and 2006) was the development plan for thenext 10-15 years; this therefore is development between 2006-2016 and 2021 at the very latest.The delivery of the proposed facility therefore post dates the University Masterplan.

- Within the Strategic Masterplan the student growth predicted for the university between 1986-2006 was an increase in students from 8,000 to 12,000 (50% increase), this has instead grown to27,513 students registered at the UoB for the academic year 19/20 (a 129% increase from 2006;figures from UoB Education Services).

- The current situation of student numbers is also contrary to the SPD that states:

"Over the next 10 years the development of the University will be largely driven by a growth inresearch activity [...]. It is anticipated that postgraduate numbers will increase by 30% from 3,000-3,900. Staff and undergraduate numbers will only increase marginally from their current levels[...]."

- The situation laid out within the SPD would have seen an increase in total numbers by 1,000students to 13,000 within the 15 year timeframe of the SPD.

- Within the SPD development residents expressed concern over large increases in studentnumbers at UoB but were reassured directly by the University that this wouldn't happen (pg 10);this is contrary to the actuality of what has come to be.

- The actual growth in student numbers (an additional 15,500 students) shows that the Universityare not acting in line with their Strategic Masterplan or SPD 11 and hence give evidence as to whythese documents should be considered void for this and other planning applications submitted bythe UoB. Planning applications by the UoB should only be considered against the relevant LocalPlans and other extant SPDs as appropriate.

2. Campus v Precinct. UoB refer throughout their application to the 'campus'; it should be notedthat the UoB is not regarded as a 'campus university' and is instead well understood to be a 'cityuniversity'; the requirements stated within the planning application regarding campus typerequirements should therefore be ignored. ("A campus university is one in which accommodation,teaching spaces, research facilities and other amenities such as shops, restaurants andlaundrettes are all on one site." The Complete University Guide.) Whilst the area in Tyndall's Parkis regarded as a "University Precinct" within the Draft Local Plan, the fact that there remains a highnumber of residential properties in the area should not be ignored and impact of any developmenton this site on residential amenity of those living locally should be considered. The applicant'sproposal is assessed to have a negative impact on residential amenity for local residents

3. Sterilisation. It is noted that within the feedback provided to the University and BCC on theimplementation of SPD11 that the following point was raised:"Would like to see more residential use in the Precinct hence concern if Hawthorns is no longer tobe used for residential purposes as it would sterilise the area. Suggestion to look at sittingaccommodation on upper floors and increase post graduate accommodation." (SPD11 Statementof Community Involvement Appendix 3 Feedback)The proposals would remove residential accommodation currently provided by the Hawthorns,

c.90 student bed spaces, and further 'sterilise' the area which is already suffering from a mass buyup of former residential units for offices and teaching space by the UoB.

4. Housing Impact and Harm. There is concern about the further pressure removal of the studentaccommodation at the Hawthorns would place on the local communities in the vicinity of theUniversity Precinct that are already suffering from large concentrations of HMOs and a largetransient populous negatively impacting on the local community. This will also reduce residentialamenity for a large number of residents as c.25 additional 3-4 bed units will be needed to beprovided in the community to mitigate the loss of the Hawthorns accommodation.

5. Heritage Impact and Harm. Whilst in principle SPD 11 (which we dispute as invalid) acceptedproposals for a new tall building on the Hawthorns site the massed appearance of the proposeddevelopment is assessed to have a significant negative impact on the valuable heritage assets inthe immediate local area (BGS Great Hall). There is also significant harm caused to the widerWhiteladies Conservation Area which ORA do not consider to be acceptable. It is noted that theproposed building would be much less imposing and cause less harm to heritage assets in thelocal surroundings within the Temple Quarter Precinct of the UoB where it's benefits would beequally valuable to the student populous. Equally a less imposing building could be proposed forthis site that does not harm the heritage assets whilst still providing the required facilities withinthis location.

6. The scale of the proposed development is also assessed to impact negatively on theconservation area and the wider area. Whilst it is stated in the City Design Group CombinedResponse that the scale of the building is comparable to that of the Physics Building, the PhysicsBuilding is sited on top of a hill at a greater elevation to that of the proposed site, so overall itsscale on the surroundings is much more dominant. This large scale will also negatively impact theresidential properties to the side and rear of the site which will suffer loss of light as the proposeddevelopment is to the southern aspect, and be subject to an overbearing outlook caused by thisbuilding. It is anticipated that Planning will have considered frosted glass to these elevations toprevent overlooking of homes and private gardens as a result of development on the site.

7. Closure of Woodland Road to Traffic. The closure of Woodland Road to traffic as part of thisapplication feels underhand to ORA and should be the subject of a separate planning application;the focus of the application for most respondents is focussed on the building of the library. It isnoted that the provision of a traffic free zone in the suggested area will predominantly benefit theUoB rather than public more generally as the majority of Woodland Road within the traffic freezone is owned by UoB. The impact of this closure is large for the surrounding roads including StMichael's Hill, Elmdale Park and Elton Road; increase in traffic flow on all of these roads willnegatively affect the amenity of residents of these streets, and the increased traffic flow on thelatter 2 of these roads will hugely impact child safety for those children attending BGS who arerequired to cross Elton Road to access school buildings. Road safety will also be impacted on thejunction of Tyndalls Park Road and St Michael's Hill which is already difficult to exit due to traffic

volume.

8. Parking. The loss of the roadway on Woodland Road for a pedestrianised zone will additionallyreduce parking in the area used by local residents and UoB students who chose to drive to thesite. Pedestrianisation will further increase parking pressures in the immediate vicinity with acommensurate negative impact on local residents.

9. Gateway Building Concept. ORA feel there is a need to separate requirement (university library/ cultural collection space) with the concept of provision of a "Gateway Building" for the UoB whichis interpreted to be a vanity project. The requirements can be met with a building of architecturalmerit that do not impose the level of harm and negative impacts on amenity that the currentproposed design does.

on 2020-05-15   SUPPORT

I support and welcome the new library as it will provide a fantastic new resource notonly for students and staff of the University of Bristol, but also for the wider community. Publicaccess to the University's Special Collections and Theatre Collection will be much improved withgreater accessibility, purpose built, flexible exhibition spaces to showcase the world classcollections and increased space for researchers to access archival material.

on 2020-04-06   SUPPORT

I am a member of the staff team working to care for the wonderful collections of objectsand archives held by the University of Bristol Theatre Collection, officially designated recently bythe Arts Council of England as being of national significance. But with no proper exhibition spacescurrently, these important collections - despite our best efforts - continue to remain largely invisibleto the public. The new university library with its dedicated public galleries, reading rooms andcollection stores, will transform the service we are able to provide, creating opportunities forschools and colleges, local communities and visitors from further afield to engage with thecollections so much more than our current premises allow. My fingers are well and truly crossedfor a favourable planning decision!

on 2020-04-03   OBJECT

Dear Bristol City Council

I would like to object to this application on the following grounds:

1) the traffic management scheme which is proposed presents a very significant health and safetydanger and raises the risk of death or serious injury. In particular the proposed scheme puts thesafety of a high number of children - including very young children at risk.

The Council will be aware that the proposed traffic scheme closes off Woodland Road at thejunction of Eldon Road to create a small pedestrian only zone allowing students to cross fromSenate House to the proposed new library. Under the scheme, all traffic will, as a result, befunnelled down Eldon Road. Eldon Road bisects the campus of Bristol Grammar School - theschool comprises around 1500 pupils and approximately 300 staff. The school owns all of thebuildings on Eldon Road opposite the main school site and those buildings are used on a dailybasis for teaching. The infant school is also on that side of the road. Throughout the day very largenumbers of pupils of all ages are crossing Eldon Road - often several times a day. The additionalweight of traffic which will be forced down Eldon Road (including construction traffic during anyconstruction phase) will place the health and safety of these children and staff at an unacceptablyhigh risk which cannot be justified under any circumstances.

2) The Council and the University of Bristol as public bodies are subject to the public sector

equality duty. In approving the proposed traffic management scheme the Council would be actingin breach of this duty as such an act would be discriminatory as it would amount to unfavourabletreatment on the grounds of age. This is because the traffic scheme disadvantages children byputting their health and safety at high risk. This discrimination is incapable of being justified as theproposed traffic scheme is a disproportionate way of achieving the university's aims.

3) The traffic scheme will also inevitably result in the pupils and staff at the school being subject toincreased air pollution. Bristol is a city where air quality already is problem. To approve a trafficmanagement scheme in the knowledge that to do so would increase air pollution in the vicinity of alarge school represents a further breach of the public sector equality duty - see 2) above and mayalso constitute a breach of the Council's duty of care.

4) The proposed building is of a disproportionate size and height to the surrounding buildings - itwould dominate the surrounding area and would look wholly out of place and out of proportion;

5) the health and safety of the school children, staff and, indeed, university students will be put atdisproportionate risk given the scale of construction and the length of time it would take toconstruct a building on such a scale - the University's renovations to the Fry Building have takenyears and caused enormous disruption and showed a total lack of regard for the school and itsstaff and pupils. There is no reason to think this build would be any different.

6) As to proposed design of the building, as presented, it raises safeguarding issues as theschool's pupils will be easily observed as the building overlooks the school's playgrounds to amuch greater extent than the existing Hawthorns building.

For these reasons I would request that permission for this building and the accompanying trafficmanagement scheme is refused.

Yours sincerely

Catherine Bell

on 2020-04-03   SUPPORT

I fully support this application and believe that the new University library would be afantastic addition to our city, helping to bring the University and the wider Bristol communitytogether.

on 2020-04-02   SUPPORT

I'm really excited about this proposal. I work at the university and think that a new facilitylike this will be able to better support the world class research that goes on here. It could help toattract new students to Bristol and also increase the appeal of the university and the city. Iunderstand that there are plans to make the lower floor open to the public not just students so itwould be a great opportunity to bring the city and university together in a way not currentlypossible at any of the library spaces. The special collections becoming more accessible to thepublic and able to showcase some of the national treasures that sit in Bristol archives would befantastic - a bit like the Public library in London with it's ground floor exhibition spaces for thepublic. I know i work at the university so could be seen as bias but i really do think this gives awonderful opportunity to connect the university more with the city it exists within and a longoverdue update to the research and study facilities for the students

on 2020-04-02   SUPPORT

I am in support of this application as the study (& collaborative) space is VERY muchneeded.However, I'd like to note that the building design isn't to my liking as I don't believe it's in keepingwith the area.

Overall, in support.

on 2020-03-31   OBJECT

I strongly support the creation of the New University Library. Not only will this be afantastic resource for students, it will also be an incredible resource for the public.

on 2020-03-31   SUPPORT

I support the proposal. The additional study space is much needed by Bristol students,and the extensive opportunities for public engagement in the space are important to Bristol'scommitment as a Civic University for the 21st Century.

on 2020-03-31   SUPPORT

on 2020-03-27   SUPPORT

We live very close to the University Campus and fully support this application. It will bea significant addition to the quality of the public realm and provide a range of exemplary publicfacilities including public access to the world class theatre collection. To repeat full support.

on 2020-03-27   SUPPORT

As both a nearby resident in Bristol and a part of the University, I am excited to see theambition associated with the development of the Clifton estate, particularly the new Library. Bristolis a world-class city with a world-class University and the Library will further enhance the itspresence, alongside iconic buildings like the Wills Memorial Building and the Physics Building, thelatter being one of the most visible structures in the city. The University has some classicbuildings, but lacks a truly modern and cutting edge piece of architecture on its Estate. The newLibrary's bold design will help residents and visitors to the city recognise Bristol as a modern andinternationally competitive Higher Education Institution. The new Library will also provide newpublic spaces to open up opportunities for the public to interact with the University's research andeducation mission. I look forward to the bold new visual feel the building will lend to an area soclose to where I live. I hope that the city will embrace the modern architectural style proposed sothat its potential to inspire the civic population can be realised.

on 2020-03-22   SUPPORT

Excellent architecture and design. Very much support this. Very valuable to Bristol andits people, not just the university.

on 2020-03-22   SUPPORT

To me, Bristol has a unique urban landscape that one can hardly find in any other citiesin the UK. It has a great balance of new built and historic buildings. That the University campusdoesn't have a clear boundary and blends nicely in with public facilities also help shape Bristol'svibrant culture. I see this plan to build the new university library a good manifest of this urbanculture, and am particularly excited about the new civic square. I particularly like how it is not onlyjust another university building, but one that actively invites the public to go on university campus .The bus shelter would also be useful for the Bristol public.

on 2020-03-20   SUPPORT

I strongly support this proposal. A new university library will be an educational place forvisitors and local residents of all ages to enjoy. It will be located at a site that is more accessible tolocal residents than the existing university libraries, and can hold public exhibitions to rich people'slife. Also, the new library itself will become a landmark to the city of Bristol.

on 2020-03-20   SUPPORT

I strongly support this planning application. Libraries are portals to all of the world'sknowledge. The university libraries play an essential role in providing safe, accessible, andeducational resource centers for diverse communities across the city. Besides, libraries areeconomically efficient. Their model of sharing allows them to serve many people with fewresources. I am pretty sure that the university libraries also contribute to the health of individualsand the community by providing a welcoming environment where people can learn more abouttheir condition, or how to support the people they care for, in their own time and on their ownterms.

on 2020-03-20   OBJECT

on 2020-03-19   SUPPORT

I strongly support this planning application. Its benefits for the city of Bristol and diversecommunities across the entire city, including my own, are going to be immense. It is clearly goingto be an imaginative new site open to city residents and visitors, as well as a vital new educationalasset. The existing university library looks and feels like a bunker closed-off from the city: this isgoing to be fully accessible and welcoming to local people of all ages. It will provide a venue toproperly and imaginatively open up the rich assets of the university to residents and visitors, andwould be a tremendous landmark addition to the city. The benefits to the city's community life, andto its cultural life will be tangible.

on 2020-03-19   OBJECT

Whilst Bristol Cycling Campaign supports the closure of part of Woodland Road and theassociated creation of a new public space this important cycle route (National Cycle Route 4)merits an exemplary design that the current proposals do not yet achieve. Our specific concernsare as follows:-1. The segregated cycle path should not be flush with the pedestrian section but have clearphysical separation, with "forgiving kerbs" as successfully used on other cycleways in Bristol. Weoppose the concept of "shared space" which is no longer seen as best practice.2. The cycle path should be of a distinctly different texture and colour from the rest of the publicspace, especially for the benefit of pedestrians with visual impairment.3. Marked zebra crossing points along the cycle path would help to draw attention to the need forcaution by all.4. We suggest that a smaller building would do more to enhance the appeal and usability of thearea and reduce the problem of sudden gusts, identified in the wind modelling report.5. We strongly object to the proposal for "deliberate ambiguity" at the busy WoodlandRoad/Tyndall Avenue/Elton Road junction: we do not believe that "vehicles will potentially giveway to pedestrians as a courtesy" (planning document: summary of Proposed Traffic Strategy 7.1)We consider that, although they are welcomed, the zebra crossings and raised central platform willdo little to protect cyclists at this junction and ask that stronger measures to clarify cycling priorityshould be included.6. Additional segregated cycle paths leading to the new library are needed in order to encouragecycling as the preferred mode of arrival.

Bristol Cycle Campaign suggests that for such a high profile development the opportunity toshowcase best practices in Bristol should be given a higher priority and we are grateful for thisopportunity to recommend improvements.

on 2020-03-18   SUPPORT

Having worked in another academic library in London, it's so important to safeguardinnovative spaces for self study and learning. I hope that this will provide an important space forthe Bristol community in the future.

on 2020-03-18   OBJECT

Dear Mr Chick,

BRISTOL GRAMMAR SCHOOLPLANNING APPLICATION 20/00433/F - THE HAWTHORNS WOODLAND ROAD BRISTOL BS81UQLETTER OF OBJECTION

Introduction

This letter sets out Bristol Grammar School's concerns regarding the proposed development of theHawthorns site. Our comments reflect the majority view of our governors, staff and parents. Wewish this to be registered as a formal objection to the application as it stands.

As way of background, we have sought constructive dialogue with the University during theevolution of this development proposal but essentially the concerns we have raised have not beenaddressed in this application.

We do not object to the principle of redeveloping the Hawthorns site and the creation of an iconicbuilding; however we have serious concerns regarding the safety and welfare of our pupils and,more generally, on the overbearing and harmful impact that the proposed development will haveon the listed School premises and the wider Conservation Area.

We had hoped that discussions with the University would continue post-submission, but we haverecently been advised that it no longer wishes to engage in proposed 3-way discussions with theCouncil. As such, the opportunity to resolve matters amicably through discussion appears to havebeen lost. Nevertheless, we shall be pleased to reconsider our objection if the issues raised in thisletter are addressed to our satisfaction.

Transportation and Highways

The safety of our pupils (as young as four years) is paramount. The proposed re-modelling of thehighways and spaces neighbouring the School, especially the proposed closure of WoodlandRoad, raise a number of fundamental concerns in this respect given the significant increase inpedestrian, cycle and vehicle flows that will occur as a result of the new library and associatedfacilities.

Furthermore, the proposals raise concerns over the impact upon the efficient day-to-day operationof the School. We summarise our concerns under the following headings:

Proposed Closure of Woodland Road and Increase in Traffic along Elton Road

The University has acknowledged that the proposed closure of Woodland Road will increase trafficon Elton Road. Our pupils cross Elton Road frequently when passing to and from the main Schoolsite and our teaching space in properties on the north side of the road. We are concerned for thesafety of our pupils with regards to any increase in traffic along Elton Road.

The Transport Assessment (TA) submitted in support of the proposals predicts that in the peakperiods, flows along Elton Road would increase by 30 vehicles per hour. However, we query theassumed redistribution of some existing trips along Woodland Road and believe that traffic flowsat the Elton Road/Woodland Road/Tyndall Avenue junction and along Elton Road would be higherthan that predicted.

The closure of Woodland Road will affect the routing of traffic to the School from the north-eastand push traffic onto sensitive parts of the highway network (such as St Michaels Hill, QueenAvenue, Queens Road, The Triangle and Park Row) which already suffer from congestion. It isapparent that the wider consequences and impacts of closing Woodland Road have not beenrobustly tested within the application.

The submitted TA states that the modelling undertaken for the proposed Clean Air Zone (CAZ)predicted a decrease in Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) of 100 vehicles on Elton Road. It isplainly evident that the impacts of the proposed closure of Woodland Road would negate anybenefit to air quality on Elton Road resulting from the proposed CAZ. Clearly, potential reductionsin local air quality are of significant concern to us given the young age of our pupils. The buildings

on each side of this road are all naturally ventilated, and there are play areas for some of ouryoungest pupils at the front of the buildings immediately adjacent to the road that will beparticularly affected.

Any increase in vehicular traffic will not only have an adverse impact on air quality but will add tonoise pollution which is a particularly problematic in an educational environment.

Increase in Pedestrian and Cyclist Flows along Elton Road

The proposed development will lead to an increase in east/west pedestrian movements to andfrom the Hawthorns site. The submitted TA indicates a potential peak increase of 800 pedestrianmovements per hour but does not provide an assessment of where these movements areexpected to be from and the capacity of existing pedestrian infrastructure to accommodate suchan increase.

Given the location of the development, it is expected that there will be a significant increase inpedestrian flows along Elton Road. There are existing capacity issues on Elton Road, and on thenetwork beyond, at the times when peak student and pupil movements coincide. Pedestriansregularly have to step into the road to pass (the footpath reduces to only 1.35m in places).

This is exacerbated by the tendency of both students and pupils to walk in groups and the fact thatnorth/south School pupil movements will clash with east/west student movements.

We believe that the pavement widths should increase to facilitate the increased pedestrianmovements from the Queens Road, Beacon House, and the University bus stops.

The review of Personal Injury Collision Data in the TA included an incident on Elton Road in whichone of our staff stepped into the road and was struck by a cyclist, resulting in a broken wrist. Inanother incident, one of our pupils was hit by a student cyclist. We are aware of a number of othernear misses on Elton Road and we are concerned that the increase in pedestrian, cycle andvehicle flows on Elton Road will significantly increase the risk of incidents involving our pupils.

There are no pedestrian crossing facilities existing or proposed at the bottom of Elton Road (whereit meets Elmdale Road) and the provision of a crossing here would make the situation much betterfor pedestrians using Elton Road.

The University's Combined Travel Plan 2018-2023 indicates that between 2006 and 2016 staffnumbers increased by 60%, undergraduate numbers have increased by 50% and postgraduatenumbers have increased by 95%. We note that the University's Masterplan for this ten year periodenvisaged only minimal growth in staff and undergraduate numbers and just a 30% increase inpostgraduate numbers. The Travel Plan also indicates that 71% of students and 43% of staff walkor cycle to the University. Therefore, our concerns relating to the proposed development are set

within a context where there has already been a significant increase in the number of students andUniversity staff walking and cycling along Elton Road and other local roads.

The application also lacks information on the future, especially when the existing library closes.Future development will impact further on traffic levels and routes. The cumulative position has notbeen considered in the application.

School Drop-Off/Pick-Up and Coach Access

Our recent travel survey has shown that Elton Road is the main drop-off and pick-up location forpupils at the School, accounting for 45%-46% of car drop-off/pick-up trips respectively.Notwithstanding that we encourage sustainable travel choices, given the School's inclusive anddiverse intake from across the greater Bristol area, it is inevitable that many of our pupils arereliant on being transported to and from School by private car because there is no public transportoption.

Elton Road is also used by the School's coaches, which make a number of trips between theSchool and its off-site sporting facilities throughout the School day, and it is also used for Schooldeliveries/servicing.

Therefore, any increase in flows on Elton Road, both pedestrian and vehicular, will have an impacton the day to day operation of the School.

Safety Issues with the Design of the Elton Road/Woodland Road/Tyndall Avenue Junction

Notwithstanding that we are fundamentally opposed to the principle of closing Woodland Road, forcompleteness we have reviewed the proposed design arrangements associated with this option.

The proposed raised table at this junction, situated directly adjacent to the pedestrianised sectionof Woodland Road, will lead to this junction effectively operating as a shared space - which arecurrently subject to a moratorium due to concerns regarding their safety.

No road markings are proposed at this junction and we consider this to be unsafe (a point that hasalready been raised by Cllr Denyer).

A National Cycle Route runs along Woodland Road. The proposed closure of Woodland Road tovehicular traffic but not to cycles may mean that car drivers travelling from Tyndall Avenue to EltonRoad may pay less attention to cycles travelling southbound on Woodland Road, including cycliststravelling to the School.

The School has concerns regarding the safety of proposed design of the cycle route through thepedestrianised section of Woodland Road and feel a clear segregated route would be safer for

pupils both walking and cycling through this space. A drop-off space is proposed to the north ofthe proposed closure and there will also be an increase in the number of our pupils dropped-off onPriory Road which will increase the number walking along this section of Woodland Road.

Summary Position

Overall, the perceived benefits of the proposed closure of Woodland Road to the University andassociated changes are outweighed by the harm and inconvenience this will cause to the widercommunity. There is also an increased risks to our pupils.

We consider that there is ample opportunity to address the concerns above and create a solutionthat will not materially increase traffic along Elton Road, and one which will make local trafficconditions safer for all users. We urge the University to reconsider these aspects of the scheme.We have offered a three-way meeting with the University and Bristol City Council to discuss theseissues and find a better solution but the University has rejected such a meeting.

Design and Heritage

We understand the University's ambitions to provide an iconic, contemporary building.Nevertheless, we cannot support the development in its current form. The proposed librarybuilding will clearly have a dominant presence in the street-scene. It is too large, and it will havean overbearing impact on the School, its setting and wider surroundings, raising concerns inrespect of both heritage and amenity.

The success and appeal of our School is very much founded on its history. Our Great Hall is ofhigh heritage significance and landmark status within the neighbouring Conservation Areas. Therelationship between the proposed library building and the Great Hall is deeply concerning giventhe scale of the proposed building, its proximity, and the high level of inter-visibility. It is abundantlyclear from the analysis and information supporting the planning application that the proposeddevelopment will be completely overbearing in the setting of the School and substantially harmful.This is reflected in the University's submitted Heritage Statement (Section 6.3.7):

The architecture, architectural contribution, character, and visual experience of the listed GrammarSchool have been extensively analysed in this statement. In addition, agreed views involving theGrammar School have been assessed to understand the impact of the new Library on its setting,experience, appreciation and legibility - in particular, VVM Views 3, 4, 17, 21 and 22 relate to theSchool. It has already been concluded that, in some cases, these views indicate there will be afairlyprofound adverse effect on experience, appreciation and/or legibility of the designated heritageasset from particular selected viewpoints.

As Figure 46 demonstrates, it would be incorrect to state that the new Library will overshadow the

important and iconic Great Hall. As has been explained earlier in this statement, its positioning onthe site by Foster and Wood has led to the Great Hall being set back some way from both EltonRoad and Woodland Road boundaries. However, while not overshadowing the Great Hall, the newLibrary will greatly change and dominate its wider setting. It will also overturn the dominance of theGreat Hall in a number of key views and, in at least one case, lead to loss of an iconic view of thecrowstepped gable and bell turret.

Pulling the foregoing considerations together, while the development proposals will not have adirect physical impact on the listed building, it is concluded that they will have a moderate adverseeffect on the significance of Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School by harming the contribution itssetting, including views, makes to its significance.

The University's conclusion above results from an academic assessment of the significance of ourheritage asset (and others) and the resulting harm arising from the proposed development. This in

itself points to the unacceptable nature of the proposals from a heritage perspective, as alreadyhighlighted by Historic England, the Conservation Advisory Panel, and others. However, thesubstantial heritage harm must also be considered alongside the likely adverse amenity impactsarising from this overbearing building design on the School's learning environment.

Due to the significant impact on the School buildings, Bristol Grammar School is undertaking afurther review of the heritage impact of the proposed new building and will submit this separately.

We have reviewed the daylight sunlight assessment submitted with the application. Theassessment considers potential effects on the main school site and our facilities on the northernside of Elton Road neighbouring the Hawthorns site, having regard also to our plannedreplacement permanent buildings at 7-9 Elton Road (planning permission ref: 18/02904/F). We areconcerned that the proposed development will adversely impact on both our temporary and ourapproved new classrooms at 7-9 Elton Road, creating an unsatisfactory learning environment forour young pupils.

The proposal is significantly taller and bigger than the existing building and this will clearly diminishthe available daylight through windows of our existing buildings in some cases, in our view, leavinglevels of natural daylight at a lower level than is acceptable for teaching purposes.

We are undertaking more detailed analysis of these issues using modelling more appropriate for alearning environment where the need for good quality natural daylight is greater than in someother situations.

In addition we are concerned at the overshadowing the proposal will have on the consented playarea to the rear of the buildings.

The adverse impacts are plainly evident in the 3D views contained within the assessment thatshow the relationship between the proposed development and 7-9 Elton Road and the substantialincrease in mass immediately neighbouring our site.

Construction Phase

We have reviewed the submitted Draft Construction Method and consider this to be a satisfactorybasis on which to develop a full Construction Management Plan in due course.

We have recently been subjected to significant disruption associated with the refurbishment worksto the University's Fry Building which in many respects were badly managed by the appointedcontractors and breached agreed measures on a regular basis.

Given the above, it is essential that the construction phase of the development is subject toappropriate controls and safeguards to ensure that the operation of the School is not materiallyaffected. All such measures should be fully enforceable.

Summary and Conclusions

Our principal concerns relate to the safety and welfare of our pupils and University students. Theyarise from the proposed re-modelling of local highways and public realm and also from the scale ofthe building and its consequential overbearing impact on the School premises.

We understand the University's aspirations for a world class library facility housed in an iconicbuilding. We believe this objective can be realised in a way that will not impact on the School andlocal community.

We have endeavoured to raise our concerns with the University on many occasions but we haveno option but to object until such time that the issues raised in this letter are addressed to oursatisfaction.

Yours sincerely,

Mr Jaideep BarotHeadmaster

on 2020-03-18   SUPPORT

I am excited for the new opportunity this provides to increase access to valuablearchives and increase civic links between the city and University. In addition I believe the changesin landscaping and transport will be of benefit.

on 2020-03-17   SUPPORT

As a resident of Bristol and a father of two children who I hope to go to university. I seethis project as a vital part of not just the capability of the University of Bristol to deliver high qualityeducation to students from around the world but also to the city itself.

on 2020-03-17   SUPPORT

The size of the building is welcome and necessary. This is due to the need forbooks/collections, it's role in enhancing education and research, much needed study space toimprove the student experience, public benefits, and a fully accessible building for all.

on 2020-03-17   OBJECT

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Although an update to date Conservation Area Appraisal has not been prepared, the

Conservation Area Enhancement Statement issued as part of the Local Plan identified

that “The broad character of the area remains largely intact and consists of large scale

terraces and some detached villas in traditional materials.” This character will be

markedly eroded by the proposed development.

Impact on Additional Heritage Assets within the Surrounds of the Site

Step 1 of the methodology recommended by the Historic England in the guidance

document Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in Planning Note 3: The Setting of

Heritage Assets is to identify which designated heritage assets might be affected by a

proposed development. Development proposals may adversely impact heritage assets

where they remove a feature which contributes to the significance of a heritage asset, or

where they interfere with an element of a heritage asset’s setting which contributes to

its significance, such as interrupting a key relationship or view.

Such impacts may not only arise from changes in the immediate street scene and

surrounds, but also alterations to long distance views across the City and changes in

skyline.

As is set out further below, the proposed development will result in a notable change to

important long-distance views from various points within the City and the skyline, with

this impacting upon the overall heritage significance of a number of designated heritage

assets, via a change in setting.

It is considered that the following Listed Buildings would be impacted upon by the

proposed development, via a change in setting:

• Grade I Listed Royal Fort and Attached Front Step Railings

• Grade II* Listed University Tower and Wills Memorial Building and

Attached Front Walls And Lamp

• Grade II Listed Bristol Grammar School

• Grade II Listed Stuart House And Attached Railings and Gates

• Grade II Listed University of Bristol, Physics Building

In addition, to the above assets, Conservation Area Appraisals for the following

Conservation Areas all identify key views from varying points within their bounds

towards the Wills Memorial Building and existing historic university buildings within the

vicinity of the proposed development site:

• College Green Conservation Area;

• Cotham and Redland Conservation Area;

• Park Street and Brandon Hill, and

• City Docks Conservation Area.

As such the proposed development has the potential to impact upon the above

Conservation Areas, via a change in setting.

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The following viewpoints within the submitted LVIA clearly articulate the harm to the

identified heritage assets.

Viewpoint 3 – Viewpoint 3 demonstrates the change that will occur in views from the

Grade II Listed Cabot Tower. The proposed development will not only result in a

dramatic change to the skyline, altering the dominance of the Listed University Buildings

(Grades I, II* and II) and the Grade II Listed Bristol Grammar School Building, but it will

also remove visibility of a grouping of Grade II* and II Listed Buildings at the junction of

Cotham Road, Hampton Road, Cotham Hill, and St Michael’s Hill. Such changes, in

particular to the University buildings and the Bristol Grammar School Building are

considered to diminish the experience and appreciation of these designated assets, and

thus impact upon their heritage significance. Such changes impact upon the experience

and appreciation of the Whiteladies Road and Park Street and Brandon Hill Conservation

Areas.

Viewpoint 4 – Alterations to the skyline are also demonstrated by Viewpoint 4 which

depicts the iconic views available down Whiteladies Road. The proposed building will

remove the dominance of the Grade I Listed Royal Fort Lodge and the Grade II Listed

Physics Building, and will impact upon the heritage significance of these assets, via

change a change in setting. It is also noted that as one moves further along Whiteladies

Road, the Wills Memorial Tower also appears in the composition of such views. Glimpsed

views of the wider countryside beyond the City, which form an important part of views

from this location (within a Conservation Area) highlighting the landscape setting of the

City as a whole, will also be eroded.

Viewpoint 6 - This viewpoint demonstrates how the proposed development will remove

the dominance of Cabot Tower in long distance views, diminishing the experience and

appreciation of this asset and landmark building. This is considered to impact upon the

overall heritage significance of this Grade II Listed Building, via a change in setting. The

Park Street and Brandon Hill Conservation Area Appraisal states: “Brandon Hill, with

Cabot Tower at its summit, and the Wills Memorial Tower are significant features picked

out in many views into the Conservation Area. Views to these landmarks are clear from

the City Docks, Victoria Park, Perrett’s Park, Southville, Totterdown and Wells Road,

Bedminster Down and Knowle.” The resulting reduction in the dominance of Cabot Tower

within such long distance views is thus also considered to impact upon the Park Street

and Brandon Hill Conservation Area.

Viewpoint 11 - This viewpoint demonstrates how the proposed development will remove

the dominance of the Wills Memorial Tower in long distance views, diminishing the

experience and appreciation of this asset. This is considered to impact upon the overall

heritage significance of this Grade II* Listed Building, via a change in setting. The

Cotham and Redland Conservation Area Appraisal identifies views of the Wills Memorial

Building, and other important buildings, from the Redland Green area (from where this

viewport is taken) as contributing to the overall character and appearance of the

Conservation Area: “Long views are the middle distance views from the Conservation

Area towards the other parts of the City. These may point towards a landmark feature or

to a specific district…Long Views are enjoyed to a number of Bristol’s landmarks and

districts including: …From Redland Green Road/Woodstock Road, south towards Wills

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Memorial Tower, Cabot Tower, Royal Fort…” The removal of the dominance of the Wills

Memorial Tower within this view is thus considered to also impact upon the Cotham and

Redland Conservation Area.

Viewpoint 17 – This clearly demonstrates the immediate street scene change, and the

height of the proposed building when compared to Senate House. The resulting change

will impact upon the experience and appreciation of the both the Whiteladies Road

Conservation Area and the Tyndalls Park Conservation Area, and detract from the

experience of the Grade II Listed Bristol Grammar School Building.

Viewpoint 20 – Viewpoint 20 also demonstrates the immediate street scene change, with

the proposed built form eroding the existing character and ability to experience the

Victorian villas. Whilst the buildings in this view are not Listed, they form an important

part of the character and appearance of the Conservation Area. The resulting change will

impact upon the experience and appreciation of the Whiteladies Road Conservation Area

Viewpoint 21 - This viewpoint is another example of how the proposed building will alter

the dominance of important heritage assets within wider viewpoints from the City – in

this case the Grade II Listed Bristol Grammar School. The ability to experience and

appreciation this asset will notably impact upon its overall heritage significance, via

change in setting. Such changes in outward views from within the Park Street and

Brandon Hill Conservation Area should also be a key consideration.

Viewpoint 23 – Viewpoint 23 demonstrates how views down Whiteladies Road will

channelled towards the proposed building, with glimpsed views of the wider countryside

beyond the City removed. The latter contribute to the character of the Whiteladies Road

Conservation Area.

Impacts associated with changes to long distance views of assets were highlighted by

Historic England within their comments dated February 2020 which state that:

“The submitted LVIA identifies a range of longer distance views that assess

impacts from most key and planned views from within and around the city.

What is quite apparent and common within these views is the primacy of the

Grade II listed tower of the Physics Building and the Wills Memorial Building

(Grade II*) on the city skyline. The proposed library building, by virtue of the

massing of the upper block, would be unduly conspicuous and visually

compete within these views.”

Changes to long distance views and resulting impacts on the Grade I Listed Wills

Memorial Tower, via a change in setting, have also been identified by the Conservation

Advisory Panel:

“The top of the building would be higher than the top of the Wills Memorial

Building, it would block and spoil both near and long views over the City.

Viewed from the top of Whiteladies Road the building would block the iconic

view of the countryside.”

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The importance of the consideration of long-distance views and the existing skyline,

alongside changes in immediate street scene, are recognised within SPD 11 which

states:

- “The location of the University on high ground means that many of its

buildings contribute significantly to the skyline and are identifiable from many

parts of Bristol.” (p7)

- “From many parts of the city, the University buildings are clearly visible due

to their elevated location. The main University buildings form a closely

related and cohesive cluster of layered, large-scale built form, which together

contribute to the skyline. Constituent vertical elements of note are the Wills

Memorial building and the Physics Tower, juxtaposed with the more

horizontal, varied form of the other faculty buildings.”(p42)

The SPD also highlights that one of the aims of new development would be to create “…

first-class new buildings which complement and enhance both the streetscape of the

Conservation Areas and contribute to distant views of the University skyline.” As

demonstrated above, this is clearly not the case with the proposed development – rather

than complement and enhance, it competes and detracts.

Heritage Impact Summary

In summary, the proposed development would impact upon the heritage significance of a

number of designated heritage assets, with such impacts arising from changes to the

character and appearance of Conservation Areas and the overall heritage significance of

Listed Buildings (including Grade I and Grade II* Listed Buildings), via a change in

setting. As demonstrated, such impacts are not only associated with localised views but

also changes to long distance views available from throughout the City.

Section 66 (1) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) states that: “In

considering whether to grant planning permission for development which affects a listed

building or its setting, the local planning authority or, as the case may be, the Secretary

of State, shall have special regard to the desirability of preserving the building or its

setting or any features of special architectural or historic interest which it possesses”.

In the 2014 Court of Appeal judgement (Barnwell Manor) it was held that: “Parliament in

enacting section 66(1) did intend that the desirability of preserving the settings of listed

buildings should not simply be given careful consideration by the decision-maker for the

purpose of deciding whether there would be some harm, but should be given

“considerable importance and weight” when the decision-maker carries out the balancing

exercise.”

Furthermore, the NPPF highlights that the more important the asset, the greater the

weight should be. Given the exceptional national importance of two of the designated

heritage assets identified as being harmed by the proposed development (the Grade I

Listed Royal Fort and the Grade II* Listed University Tower and Wills Memorial Building),

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very great weight should be given to the conservation of these assets – Historic England

state that “Grade I buildings are of exceptional interest and only 2.5% of listed buildings

are Grade I…Grade II* buildings are particularly important buildings of more than special

interest; 5.8% of listed buildings are Grade II*”

With regards to impacts on the Whiteladies Road Conservation Area, Section 72(1) of the

Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 states:

“In the exercise, with respect to any buildings or other land in a conservation

area, of any powers under any of the provisions mentioned in subsection (2),

special attention shall be paid to the desirability of preserving or enhancing

the character or appearance of that area.”

In addition to such Legislation, Policy BCS22 of the Bristol City Council Core Strategy

states that “Development proposals will safeguard or enhance heritage assets”, with

Policy DM31 continuing by stating that “Development that has an impact upon a heritage

asset will be expected to conserve and, where appropriate, enhance the asset or its

setting…”

It is clear that the proposed development does not conserve or enhance the heritage

significance of the designated heritage assets identified, and is thus not in accordance

with the obligations of National Legislation or Local Planning Policy.

Comments on the Submitted Cultural Heritage Statement

The following are highlighted with regard to the assessments provided within the

submitted Cultural Heritage Statement prepared by Heritage Places:

- The Cultural Heritage Statement does not utilise the most-recently issued

guidance on assessing heritage significance - Historic England’s Statements of

Heritage Significance: Analysing Significance in Heritage Assets, Historic England

Advice Note 12. This document, and Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in

Planning Note 2, advises using the terminology of the NPPF and PPG; this

approach is not undertaken within the Cultural Heritage Statement.

- The Setting Assessment appears to have been heavily influenced by a narrow

study area, which is not considered to suitably reflect the topographical context of

the Site or the height of the proposed development. Whilst it is acknowledged

that the author has included an assessment with regard to the Grade II Listed

Cabot Tower due to potential impacts on long range views of this asset, it is

puzzling as to why the Grade II* Listed Wills Memorial Tower has not been

included within the assessment for the same reasons. As set out above, the

proposed development will notably impact upon the dominance of the latter from

a number of vantage points throughout the City, with this impacting upon the

heritage significance of the asset, via a change in setting.

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Design and SPD11

SPD 11 was published in 2006 and sets out an agreed masterplan for the ongoing

development of University of Bristol Site. Although it is acknowledged that the

document is now nearly 17 years old and the masterplan planned for a 10-15 year

period, Bristol Central Area Plan Policy BCAP11 recognises that regard must be had to its

principles for university development within the defined university precinct that covers

the Hawthorns site.

It therefore remains a key and robust material document in assessing proposals upon

the site. In particular, its site appraisal remains sound for the Hawthorns with its

conclusions based upon the exploration of a number of design options. Moreover, the

document was agreed between the City Council and the applicant (Bristol University) and

represents the starting point for detailed design consideration for this site.

Page 20 of the SPD sets out a ‘general conservation strategy’ to be considered by new

development proposals, including:

“The preference is for early University buildings to be retained and where expansion is required this should be done in a way that produces an

enhancement to their setting and the character and appearance of the

Conservation Area.”

“New buildings should be congruent both with their immediate surroundings and their wider context. If tall buildings are proposed they should be tested

against SPD1 and should contribute to the historic environment at street level

as well as to the wider views of the city.”

Concerning the surrounding University buildings and Conservation Area, as discussed

further below it is not considered that the development proposals ‘enhance’ the heritage significance of the identified designated heritage assets, including the surrounding

Whiteladies Road Conservation Area and the Grade I Listed Wills Memorial Building.

Potential impacts arising from the proposed development, in particular with regard to the

latter, are not just associated with changes in the immediate surrounds, but also

alterations to important elements of the skyline.

Strategic Move 9 of SPD 11 focuses upon the redevelopment of the Hawthorns site,

including its demolition, with p67 setting out a number of ‘site conditions’ and design

principles which should be taken into account when redeveloping the Site, including:

“Site Area/Building Footprint: It is important for the new development to

respect the building lines of existing developments on Elton Road and

Woodlands Road.

Building Massing and Scale: A range of design options have been explored. It

is believed that the site could accommodate a development of between 3 and

7 storeys to allow building heights to step up to reach the height of Senate

House opposite. Bearing in mind the scale of the new development should

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relate sympathetically to the scale of neighbouring proprieties.”

With regard to Point 1, a simple comparison between the existing and proposed site

plans clearly demonstrates how the proposed new building in no way responds to, or

respects, the buildings lines provided by the existing Hawthorns building or those outside

of the site along Elton Road and Woodlands Road. This is clearly demonstrated on p.51,

p. 88 and particularly p.93 of the Design and Access Statement (DAS) submitted in

support of the proposal. In these images the element closest to the western boundary

dominates Bristol Grammar School (‘Barton’s, ‘Martins’s’ and ‘Garrett’s’) at 6 storeys,

whilst the mass of the proposal as a whole goes completely beyond the domestic scale of

these buildings.

A case is made within the DAS (p.49) for the massing response that involves a ‘stepped’

approach, with each massing element sharing a relationship with buildings in context.

The lowest element that relates to the domestic scale of the surrounding buildings

(Bristol Grammar School) on Elton Road and University buildings on Woodland Road and

Priory Road, forms a disproportionately small element of the overall proposal. This is

particularly the case when viewed from Elton Road, and would not be perceptible once

built.

The ‘middle’ massing element of the proposal supposedly relates to the junior and

infants building of Bristol Grammar School. This building is positioned much further away

than those domestic scale buildings of Bristol Grammar School mentioned above and we

envisage that the relationship between the two elements would be difficult to interpret in

reality and would not help to mitigate the uncomfortable relationship between the

monumental scale of the proposed library, and the domestic scale of the buildings north

and west of the site. Furthermore, the Victorian Gothic architectural elements of the

junior and infants building that include a pitched roof, castellated parapets , chimneys

and towers result in a building which is complex with a tapered roof form: very different

from the monumental block-like massing of that element of the proposed library to

which it supposedly relates.

Lastly the relationship between the tallest stepped element of the proposal and the

University physics building to the south east ignores the presence of the domestic-scaled

buildings that lie across the site’s north eastern, northern, western and southern

boundaries. This is important since it is from within this context that the monumental

proportions of the proposed library would be viewed. Despite the screening effect of the

existing trees present within the CGIs displayed on p. 96 and 97 of the DAS, it is still

just about possible to perceive the excessive mass of the tallest proposed elements in

context when viewed from Woodland Road and Elton Road.

We would therefore argue that the ’stepped approach’ is selective in terms of the

contextual buildings it references and that in reality the size and mass of the proposed

building would not suitably respond to the scale of the surrounding buildings sufficient to

be perceptible or to overcome the uncomfortable relationship between the proposal and

the majority of buildings in context.

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Concerning scale, the proposed building is nearly double the height of the existing

Hawthorns building and surrounding villas, and taller than Senate House. Within this

context, as articulated by the proposed south and west elevations, the overall size and

mass of the proposed building does not suitably respond to the scale of the surrounding

buildings.

Urban Living Assessment

SPD11 cross-references SPD1 – Tall Buildings. This has since been superseded by the

Urban Living SPD (ULSPD). The Planning Statement accordingly contains an assessment

against the questions set out. This raises the following concerns in summary:

The SPD makes clear that major development proposals should contain an assessment of

how the scheme performs against each question showing evidence and scoring schemes

robustly. The assessment provided only answers the ‘headline’ questions within the SPD

and does not address the series of detailed criteria. The assessment is therefore

considered to inadequately respond and gives the impression of being deliberately so to

avoid setting out any negative implications of the development.

The responses throughout the ULSPD assessment fail to respond to the contextual

appraisal and capacity set out within SPD11 for the site, despite explicit references to

considering and agreeing such matters with the LPA. SPD11 represents an existing

agreement between the applicant and the LPA and the divergence from this is a key

failure of the scheme that requires express justification.

The response to Question 3.1 infers that the SPD11 reference to a ‘landmark building’

equates to justification for a tall building, despite extensive design parameters set in

SPD11 that the scheme diverges from delivering. Furthermore, this response refers to

SPD11 Strategic Move 8 for the separate Tyndall’s Avenue/St Michael’s Hill site –

identified for a potential tall building – broadly 200m to the east and infers this justifies

the tall building response at this site.

In this regard It is noted that the submitted LVIA seeks to diminish the adverse effects

of development it identifies by ascribing benefits in all contexts by the addition of

‘distinctive, well-designed built form to the skyline’ as well as public realm enhancements

to local views, despite the above and below referenced critique of the design that clearly

diverges from the intention of the stepped design approach, building footprint and

surrounding road network as set out in SPD11. Nevertheless, the submitted LVIA

remains concluding moderate/substantial adverse effects at a local level, some moderate

adverse effects in middle distance views, and slight adverse effects in long-distance

views. The conclusion of the document is elusive in its wording stating that the design

approach has “as far as possible, mitigated the adverse effects and maximised the

opportunities for enhancement”.

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Transport

The proposal seeks the closure of Woodlands Road to vehicular traffic and to reorganise

St Michael’s Park to be one-way to facilitate its safe functioning. While it is understood

that this has evolved from proposals to close Tyndall’s Park Road in a withdrawn 2017

scheme, it is noted that SPD11 does not address the closure of Woodlands Road and

explicitly notes that the latter option was withdrawn following consultation feedback and

proposal for alternate solutions. As set out above SPD11 remains a material

consideration identified by the adopted local plan and is an agreed document between

the City Council and the University.

This change is again reflective of the University seeking to significantly increase the

scope of development, and its resulting implications, at the Hawthorns site beyond that

agreed in the parameter set out in SPD11.

Yours sincerely

Gareth Roberts

Associate

gareth.roberts@pegasusgroup.co.uk

cc. David Martyn – Heritage Officer Design Officer

on 2020-03-16   SUPPORT

on 2020-03-16   SUPPORT

As a Bristol University library employee and Bristol resident I support the plans. As anex public library worker I care a lot about educational resources interacting with the wider publicand can say I'm heartened to see that the plan has the general public in mind, with areas for publicuse.

on 2020-03-16   SUPPORT

As a staff member at the University of Bristol I am fully supportive of these plans toimprove student experience and public engagement. I am particularly interested in the ability toshowcase the University's amazing special collections in a fully accessible building

on 2020-03-16   SUPPORT

I believe the proposed Library will be an exciting and welcome new development withinthe city of Bristol. It is necessary both for the University's needs as a space to house books andthe University's many world-leading collections. But, the benefit will also extend to the widercommunity in Bristol as they will be able to access these resources and make use of a modern,cutting edge cultural space. Added to this are the enhancements it offers for education andresearch for both staff & students as well as residents of Bristol.

on 2020-03-16   SUPPORT

I think this is a hugely significant and important proposal, not just for the University butfor the city of Bristol and its residents and visitors. The books and collections that will be availableto see and use within the space will enhance both education and research in a way that has notbeen possible before now. The space itself seems to me to be exciting and inspiring for all users;students, staff and the public. The level of accessibility that it offers is particularly forward thinkingand exciting and looks to be something that the city could be very proud of.

on 2020-03-14  

As I see it this building will announce to those coming from the north that they havearrived at the notable Bristol University with all its intellectual endeavours and that from theresouthwards a different urban grain applies. This will of course depend on the northern aspects ofthe library being handled with as much finesse as other elevations.

Despite its size I think it will tend to 'hide away' and then suddenly be 'discovered' according to thevarious directions from which one approaches for example over the rise as one surmountsWoodland Road coming from town or glancingly along St Michael's Park.

Its form is reminiscent of a pile of books on top of another pile of books, so appropriate for a librarybuilding. I am not too concerned about what it will look like from Dundry!

Its design will add zest to the area and compensate for the dreary Gothic Revival design of theschool nearby.

I welcome the proposed concourse outside across to the old Senate House but suggest a fountainor large sculpture is added to it as a centre point that will add 'focus'.

I understand the public realm will include significant parts of the interior. The British Library onEuston Road in London does this and I welcome a large library facility in Bristol that will do this.

on 2020-03-14  

We, The Christmas Steps Arts Quarter (Residents & Traders) feel that the libraryscheme and the traffic-closure scheme should have been submitted as two separate applicationsas they present important but differing issues.

Having put that on record, we strongly object to the application on a large number of grounds, asfollows:

This Association agrees with and adds its weight to all of the objections raised by these sixrespected bodies: Historic England ; The Victorian Society ; The Kingsdown Conservation Group ;The Clifton & Hotwells Improvement Society , The Conservation Advisory Panel ; Bristol CivicSociety. Chief amongst their objections are:

1. The scale, design and materials of the proposed library fail to respect the close proximity ofvarious important listed buildings, including those of Grade 1. 2. The scale and height fails to staywithin the previously-agreed University Masterplan, grossly exceeding it in mass and by at leasttwo storeys in height. 3. The scale, design and materials are not in keeping with the attractive leafystreets and traditional stone-built townhouses of the Conservation Areas as called for in variousBristol planning policies (which we have previously quoted and which can be repeated uponrequest).

We also agree with the many objections from local residents: Woodland Road should not be

closed to public traffic, as this would impede access to much-frequented destinations such asBristol Grammar School and the Christmas Steps Arts Quarter and would impede/divert existingbus routes. It would also make Elton Road dangerously congested and over-burdened withdiverted traffic. Whilst we applaud the revised proposal that Tyndall Avenue should remain a two-way street, this in itself is insufficient to maintain the vital free-flowing of public traffic.

Many local people feel that the proposed closure and "Campusification" of this central section ofWoodland Road is an arrogant and unnecessary land-grabbing exercise purely for the vanity andself-aggrandisement of the University to the detriment of the public interest and the road'straditional character and continuity. Woodland Road was a public thoroughfare on the maps by1880 and the University was not even founded until 1909, its creeping development across thesummit of St. Michael's Hill coming later again. The much larger and world-renowned universitiesof Oxford and Cambridge continue to flourish with no "Campusification" of their inter-meshednetwork of city streets, so we see no reason why the University of Bristol should not content itselfwith co-existing with the public's traffic movements in a similar manner.If "Campusification" is consider to be a must, then we agree with the objectors who feel that thereis probably more scope for this (and possibly an "Ultra-modern" library?) at the University's newbrown-field site in the Temple Quarter area of Bristol.

In summary, this Association strongly reinforces the abovementioned fundamental objections tothe building of the library as presently designed, and deeply objects to any closures or restrictionsto the existing traffic movements.

on 2020-03-13   SUPPORT

I think this plan is a fantastic idea - it will be sad to see some of the existing oldwoodland road buildings go but this is a good move both socially and environmentally. I especiallylike the part about local residents being able to use it too, the University can't just keep expandingin the city while giving nothing back to local residents, so I'm glad they too can also have access.

Pedestrianising that area is such a good move! it will encourage more walking and cycling andpeople who already do that will feel a lot safer and it will feel more spacious.

The facilities that this library will offer are fantastic too as it won't just be a place to study andlearn, but it will give people a chance to practice creativity too.

on 2020-03-13   SUPPORT

on 2020-03-13   SUPPORT

on 2020-03-13   SUPPORT

The Theatre collections at Bristol University is second to the V&A. I believe the newlibrary will be a real opportunity to showcase these collections to the public so that the averageBristol person has the V&A on their doorstep. At the moment the collections are hidden in adifficult to access building that you'd never know about unless you'd been told about it.

Opening the new library up to the public on the ground floor is a badly needed symbol for theuniversity in response to the 'ivory tower' perception of the university. It will change the wayuniversity staff work and make the library experience much more relevant, protecting the servicefor the future.

on 2020-03-12   SUPPORT

This new library has the capacity to create a new and welcoming space that invites thecity into the University realm, something that hasn't happened that well up until now.

on 2020-03-12   OBJECT

Sadly I find I must object to these proposals. I both live and have a business nearby anddo use Woodland Rd, St Michael's Hill and Tyndall Ave. I am both a former student and academicstaff member of University of Bristol. I think library space, study space, research space isimportant for a university, but this project has too many downsides for the local area, local peopleand potential visitors.

The size and mass of the building does not blend into the local conservation area at all. Thelocation is a high point and design is to provide views out for its occupants, but will be an eye sorefor much of Bristol as it juts above trees and everything else. Its a Me, Me, Me project for theuniversity. The building should be no higher than adjacent residential houses to blend into theconservation area.

The university used to be part of the city, now it wants to isolate itself, call itself a campus, have afocal point entry area not be part of a wider community. The Wills Building has been a historicfocal point maybe now two focal points and two gateways are wanted. The UoB used to haveopen access to most buildings but it started to go into lockdown in the 1980's this doesn't reversethat. A cafe, event and exhibition space doesn't make the university integrated with its localcommunity.

The height will stand out in views from much of Redland, Cotham, Clifton, even from the Downs,parts of Southville. The vent structures of Clifton Down Shopping are visible for miles, this will be

much more intrusive. Architecturally is is reminiscent of some of the cuboidal structures of thecommunist era structures with added louvres, its not a masterpiece. They say they want it as abeacon while outside I and it seams many others don't want a big square block as a beacon onthe skyline.

Calling this a proposed library is almost a half truth, it is more a student study and social spacewith some books and collections in it. The specialist collections could be brought together in newfacilities at the Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus, the study spaces reduced with more spacesprovided in student accommodations and the mass of the building reduced to fit much better in theconservation area.

The university has bought a very large area of land for its Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus inSaint Phillips for some of this new expansion. The major part of the new library and study unitsshould really be put on this Temple Quarter university property. Use this old site for a more limitedin scope building which would blend in with the area. It should be no higher than the currentHawthorns and adjacent buildings.

The university has greatly increased its student numbers with many feeling this has been done tothe detriment of the local area. The increased student numbers are making life much more difficultlocally for non-students as well as students. The university doesn't ameliorate this increased sizewith help to the city. It receives discounted property rates, its students don't contribute council tax,the university doesn't contribute to the city to cover for the extra costs of rubbish clearance, police,health care brought by the increase in student numbers. This should be considered in planninggains for the city as would be required by most other large developments.

The Public Realm aspects are effectively a land grab by the university. Blocking a significantthough minor thoroughfare of Woodland Rd increases distance and journey times for many. Itadds nothing which would attract non-students to visit and enjoy the area (it isn't designed to). Itdoesn't separate cyclists from pedestrians. It does reduce the ability to visit as it removes 10 onstreet parking spaces and about 50 parking spaces from the current Hawthorns site to sterilize thearea even more for just students.

The Public Realm Public art could be at any and multiple locations around the university, it doesn'tneed to have this place as special. The ground floor will have some public access with the mainupper floors as private university so not part of the public realm.

The existing Arts and Social Sciences Library is not that old, yet its claimed it is not hospitable,cramped, has poor daylighting with an unwelcoming entrance lobby. So how did the university getit so completely wrong not that many years ago. Are the current proposals a grand folly?

Room heights of 4,7m or some smaller ones reduced to 3,5m will give a feeling of space andopenness but this does add considerably to the building height.

Heating, cooling and hot water are proposed to be delivered by air source heat pumps. Knowingtheir use in other situations people comment how quiet the area becomes during a power outage.Heat pumps can be a significant low level but constant noise generator. With up to 3000 people,many with electronic gadgets, in the building at one time cooling is going to be critical so heatpumps working hard. Air source heat pumps will never be silent and can make traffic noise whichgenerally goes down at night seem preferable. A constant low hum can be very annoying.

The proposals for this project are to provide resources for the Arts and Social Sciences Faculty.This area of university expansion seems of late to start being questioned as many of the studentswill end up with significant debt and prospects for jobs needing university qualifications are limited.For the university these are probably the most profitable students. The facilities being proposedhere are stated to be forward looking, but real forward for these subjects might be online, distantlearning with only occasional visits to a central university department.

on 2020-03-12   SUPPORT

This is a laudable project which deserves every support and approval to provideUniversity of Bristol students with state-of-the-art resources and learning space.

on 2020-03-12   OBJECT

The idea is good. Creating an open space - connecting university staff and studentswith Bristol's citizens - and connecting the university archives and collections with Bristol, where alot of the archives originated.

But this building doesn't do it. It is a monstrosity, imposing its presence on its surroundings - andlike the Wills tower - imposing its presence on the city.

Please try again - make an inviting place that everyone will want to become part of, rather than ashow-off place.

on 2020-03-11   SUPPORT

Now we are not getting an arena or other public space in central Bristol next the newuniversity campus near Temple Meads, this development should promote closer ties with the Citycommunity and the University through shared exhibition and social space on the Clifton campus.Much of the university's hidden treasures and other collections should be accessible to all and thisprovide the opportunity to showcase them, a benefit to Bristol, nationally and perhapsinternationally.

on 2020-03-10   OBJECT

Interest - Summary of objection

I am a North Bristol resident and use the cycle route marked through the area from Cotham Hill toreach the city centre, the Triangle, College Green and St Michaels itself.

I object to the application because it is grossly out of character for the area, and because thepublic realm works are designed to obscure and obstruct the cycle route and cycling on otherroads.

The Library Building

The proposed Library building is obviously grossly out of scale and character for the area. Therelevant civil society and official bodies, such as Historic England, are objecting on these grounds,and their comments give considerable detail about the problems, which I do not need to repeat.

Public Realm

The university appears to be determined to create a campus in the area, preferably by taking overpublic land, as in the previous application for a different nearby location. No doubt the repeatedapplications are made in the hope that public and civic bodies will eventually get tired of objectingand let a proposal slip through. On this occasion the University appears to be making a greater

attempt to organise its claque, with comments in support from various university and distantaddresses, including, typically, a writer from Walthmastow, London, who gives as reason forsupport that he is a Bristol alumnus.

If the University wishes to make a contribution to the public realm it could consider its previousbrutalist concrete contributions, and proposed removing one of them. Monotliths like the PhysicsLaboratory and the new library would look much more suitable in the repurposed industrialwasteland near Temple Meads where they obviously intend to create their main campus.

Cycling

The Public Realm works lie across a major marked cycle route on Woodland Road giving lowtraffic access parallel to and as an alternative to the major Whiteladies Road axis from NorthBristol to the town centre and within and around Cotham, St Michaels and the Triangle shoppingarea.

The current route runs on low traffic roads with obvious priorities and crossings, allowing easycycling movement and clarity about all users intentions. The proposed pedestrian area is designedaround the concept of making it coventionally pretty by making the indications of the cycle routeobscure. Like all shared space this creates hazards, because no-one will know what to expect.The new route across the Centre in Bristol referred to as a precedent is already regarded assimilarly unsatisfactory due to the lack of clarity in it markings. Sustrans, the consultant quoted insupport, have an established reputation for producing peculiar and unworkable cycling facilities,and a background in untarmaced old railway paths rather than urban planning.

Exclusion of Motor Traffic

The exclusion of motor traffic from the short length by the proposed library is of no benefit tocyclists, this not currently being the part of Woodland Road where conflict is most common, thatbeing the hill. Traffic elsewhere will not be reduced since the University obviously wishes to keepaccess for its own buildings along all other roads.

For local access cyclists use all the roads joining Woodland Road, all of which will be affected, sothe statement that only 60 m of cycle lane will be included in the public realm is misleading, notcounting, for example, the changes designed to slow cyclists in other roads.

Cycling is a relatively slow method, to be convenient and attract increased usage it needs to haveclear simple routes on which reasonable speeds can be maintained. Too many cycle facilities arecomplicated and unclear and this proposal would reduce clarity and increase complexity.

The proposals are for a shared space with subtle lane markings and implicitly no priorities. Thiswill slow cyclists and cause danger from uncertaintity about various users intentions. There will be

explicit measures to slow cyclists on hills. These are bizarre, it is proposed to slow cyclists onElton Road, whilst maintaining a motor vehicle route with no hint of any measures to slow them.

As a further hindrance to cyclists some roads become one way with contraflow cycling. One wayroads usually increase traffic speeds, endangering cyclists. In this case contraflow provision, forwhich no design details are provided, is likely to be a surprise to drivers, increasing the danger tocyclists.

The before and after diagrams (6.6.4) are misleading, showing no change, whereas thedescription makes it clear that the cycle route will be effectively suppressed over at least 60 m ofWoodland Road and hindered on other roads, such as Elton Road.

The proposal to interrupt cycling arises directly from the University's desire to create a pseudo-campus, this being the second attempt in the area, the successive selection of location beingobviously random, with no real relevance to the city, neighbourhood, pedestrian, cycle or motortraffic flows.

Designing for Cycle & Pedestrian Flows

Should the council feel that excluding motor traffic from some streets would be of benefit to localpeople and Bristol residents then it should be based on retaining typical kerb separations alongthe cycle routes leaving all users clear about what is happening. This would also match thetraditional appearance of the area. If there are any pedestrian flows that need extra priority thennew zebra crossings are a long established solution.

on 2020-03-09   OBJECT

Having worked at the University for over 40 years, in Tyndall Avenue since 1991, and inOldbury House at the top of St Michaels Park before then, I am well aquainted with this area andthe facilities in the Social Sciences library. I also helped with the theatre collection catalogue. Ihave deposited items for the archives in both libraries and know them well.- The site is in the Whiteladies Road and the Tyndalls Park conservation area.- very few books in there! The introduction states there is accommodation for 420,000 books +70,000 journals. There are 980,033 books with 'e' in the keyword alone in the Arts and Scienceslibrary alone! 117,698 journal titles (but more than one volume per title). Books that have not beenused for over 4 years will be put in store. But not all the books can be taken out so how do theyknow? What about the books in the Theatre collection, let alone the ephemera aboutperformances? When the extra mural library closed, many books went to the Oxfam shop. I havebought books in the Social Sciences library when they had sales of books surplus to requirements.- ASSL will stay within the library family and options are being looked at. There is no good reasonto demolish a building in a conservation area that is in keeping with the area when one alreadyhas a purpose built library that was only built in 1973.- Hawthorns current staff will need new accommodation.- 116 beds of student accommodation lost- Currently 273 study spaces. 2000 study spaces are provided, but then most of the buildingsseem to have been converted to study spaces including Senate House. There must be a limit thatthe University students can grow to. The staff to student level must be very low now.- The University needs reminding that this is not a campus- it is a university in a residents area

New Building and conservation area- Bristol's heritage being ripped down and replaced by a building so out of keeping with the locallandscape that I honestly can't believe that this design could be put forward. it should be inkeeping with its surroundings and not involve demolishing the current building. The design for thisnew building is horrendous. too large and too out of character for its surroundings. dominateslandscape- area which is noted as a suburban area of high quality tree-lined streets and large detachedvillas. It should also be noted that whilst Hawthorns has undergone undesirable alteration it is alandmark and fits it surrounding more satisfactory than the proposed building. Hawthorns is also abuilding of considerable age being built in 1888, as four separate villas.- Bristol grammar school listed and dominated by this building- The Library would be 55% larger than the library in the University's 2006 Masterplan. The Librarywould be taller than the Senate House, starting from a lower base. At 37.5m tall it is over twice ashigh as the existing Hawthorns building and 8m higher than the bulk of neighbouring SenateHouse. It rises over 30m higher than the rooftops of the neighbouring villas (school buildings) onElton Road. The view from Woodland Road south shows this (appendix 6 part 4). It is notacceptable to state that its scale is comparable in scale to Bristol Grammar (section 5) when itdefinitely is not (as can be seen from the visuals). Only the second floor may be.- The visuals in appendix 6 are hard to follow since they do not point out the location and are toofar away. They appear to show that the new building is even taller than Wills building. Part 1 ismissing. There are very few pictures showing the proposed building, only the existing so are prettypointless. The ones that do show it show a monolithic building and emphasise how tall and wide itis (part 4). The most important view is hidden by a conker tree. Why not stand in front of it? TheElton Road image is deliberately taken too far down the road. The existing views show how lovelythe victorian villas are and how out of context the modern building will be. Street-level views fromElton Road, Woodland Road, the neighbouring school, etc. would more clearly demonstrate theimpact this building will have, not to mention changing the skyline of Bristol for the worse, visiblefrom the Downs to the harbourside- Design part 7 shows upper terrace far higher than senate house. Misleading aerial shots- section 3.9 shows the current building elevation to be considerably lower than Senate House.Why not show the proposed building elevation to compare? This is not acceptable. This is totallyunacceptable.- section 3.11 The immediate building height conditions vary from the 3-4 storey Victorian villas onElton Road and Priory Road to the 7-8 storey institutional scale University buildings along TyndallAvenue. An opportunity exists to better mediate the shift in scale from the lower residentialVictorian villas to the institutional scale of Senate House to hold the corner of Elton and WoodlandRoad and form a gateway building to the University Precinct. This is no excuse at all. This is aconservation area and the Hawthorns sits on the same side as the villas and is already veryprominent. It will dwarf the adjacent villa in Elton Road and the villas in Woodland Road.- 'The original villas along Woodland Road which now form part of the Hawthorns have beenaltered to such an extent that their significance and value have been lost. The building that exists

is domestic in scale and largely unsuitable for modern teaching requirements. a HeritageStatement of Significance has been undertaken (See Appendix) which concludes that theHawthorns is not a heritage asset, is of no heritage significance, and has no meaningful heritagevalue or interest meriting consideration in the planning process. This simply is not true.- Historic England- lengthy 5 page strong objection: "As it stands, we object to the proposedscheme, as this would be unduly harmful to the character and appearance of the ConservationArea and the setting of key heritage assets. We believe that a substantial building can bedelivered on this site, as demonstrated by the SPD. Subject to a contextual design based uponthis massing model, we would be in a position to withdraw our objection." Inspector of HistoricBuildings and Areas- There are no solar panels planned for the roof. It suffices in the planning documents undersustainability simply to say that there is the potential of installing solar panels on the roof. Theactual compliance does not appear to be stated. BREEAM rating has yet to be determined.- No response was provided within the short time-frame of report production in this case by theHistoric Environment Officer of the Conservation department. It is vital that he should have beengiven more time! The length of time was not noted.- The (vertical sky) VSC daylight and sunlight results for Bristol Grammar School proposed newclassrooms meet the guidelines in 8 out of 11 instances. The windows which do not meet theguidelines are within a ground floor classroom which has 2 further windows that do receive levelsof daylight that meet the recommendation. The windows which do not meet the 0.8 reductionfactor target of 0.8 have results of 0.44, 0.49 and 0.57. This is unacceptable. The 3d views do notreally show the size of the building except the view looking South. None are at ground level. Noneshow Senate House properly since the view looking northwest is misleading regarding height.- Only the view from Cabot Tower shows the massive height and width of the building- Wind Conditions are not suitable for the entrance! This is apparently a minor adverse effect sincethe entrance is only affected in winter. The road between Senate House and the new building alsoshow a wind tunnel affect for pedestrians in Winter.- All of the objectives of Tyndall's Park Conservation Area appear to be broken!- Reduction of Emissions [M]-4 CREDITS Not currently anticipated to be possible to achieve. Theprinciple of BREEAM 2018 credit Ene 01 'Prediction of Operational Energy Use' will be followed,but the Design Team cannot commit to achieving the credit. The Design Team is targeting boththese credits under BREEAM 2014. Therefore, the principle of these credits will be followed.However, the difference in method between BREEAM 2014 and 2018 means that it would beimpractical for the Design Team to commit to the achieving the credits under BREEAM 2018! Itwould have been better to have followed BREEAM 2018 creditation from the start to obtaincredibility.- Glazing area will be 28% of the area compared with the national area of 15%. This means highmaintenance costs to clean them and higher heating and cooling costs. The windows are huge.

Cafe- The Hawthorns currently has a very pleasant cafe and terrace and meeting rooms on the groundfloor. This will be replaced by another small cafe on the ground floor (design 10).

Transport- no reference to Elton Rd public realm- how affects Bristol Grammar School, they say they haveyet to discuss!- I object to closing part of Woodland Road to through traffic to make a pedestrianised area. Thisdiverts buses up to St Michael's Hill, and would mean other vehicles also diverted. Vehicles on thewest side of Woodland Rd are sent up the narrow St Michaels Park , past the University nurserythereby increasing the pollution for the under 5's attending here and then forcing this traffic tomake an exit onto the busy St Michaels Hill. I do not consider this to be well thought through.- I have concerns about the safety for those pedestrians using Elton road which will haveincreased volume of traffic under the current proposed plans (with the pedestrian area forcingmore traffic down Elton road). I am particularly concerned as those using Elton road (I.e. thechildren of Bristol Grammar School) are more vulnerable road users and extra care andconsideration needs to be given to optimise their safety which I don't feel the current planprovides. It will increase pollution on Elton road and again children are more vulnerable to theeffects of this. A pedestrianised area is in principle a good idea but not at the expense of thesafety and health of children using Elton road and this aspect of the plan needs to be amended- It also leads to the proposal to re-align the central refuge at the junction of Tyndall's Avenue andSt Michael's Hill to allow buses to negotiate this junction. However, this will make it even harder forpedestrians to cross the road at a point where vehicles frequently turn into Tyndall's Avenuewithout slowing.- Moving the west bound bus stop from Elton Road forces children to use the new one In TyndallsAvenue forcing them to cross a dangerous crossing. Currently they do not have to cross a roadand get straight off by the school.- A number of bus services run adjacent to the site, including the U1 university service alongWoodland Rd and the 9/72 public service along Tyndall Avenue & Elton Road. U1 buses run every6 minutes in the rush hour. Pushing this onto St Michaels Hill will cause unnecessary traffic chaosespecially when the buses are trying to get to Stoke Bishop so will now have to negotiate thenarrow part of St Michaels Hill and the whole of Tyndalls Park Road rather than just driving alongWoodland Road to Tyndalls Park Rd to Whiteladies Road (p10 of transport plan appendix).- Looking at the traffic flow statistics in part 2 p43-73 are very confusing with inconsistent layoutsof figures and much missing data particularly in the redistribution maps and little explanation inpart 1. How can stopping traffic between St Michaels Park and Elton Road cause less traffic to goup Tyndalls Avenue yet gain more traffic in St Michaels Hill in the morning peak; for example?How can stopping traffic between St Michaels Park and Elton Road cause 9 more traffic to go upTyndalls Avenue yet gain more traffic in St Michaels Hill in the evening peak (47 to 72 past theTyndall Avenue junction; for example(p71)? Where has the traffic come from? Queuing trafficcaused by the diversions does not help the pollution. It is admitted that the observed queuelengths for Tyndall Avenue are greater than the modelled queue lengths. The parameters usedwithin the model were reviewed to better reflect observations, but the observed queue lengthscould not be replicated. In the Weekday AM Peak in Tyndall Avenue, the maximum queue lengthis around 140m in length (equivalent to 20 PCUs in Vissim). In the weekday AM peak hour, the

junction is forecast to exceed practical capacity in the '2024 Do Something' scenario andapproaches theoretical capacity. The estimated queue on St Michaels' Hill is estimated to increasefrom 2 PCUs to 16 PCUs. Widening St Michael's Hill to provide a right-turn lane would likely resultin negative impacts on the pedestrian environment and has therefore been discounted. With theaverage timings taken from the SCOOT outputs, the St Michael's Hill entry to the Maudlin Streetjunction currently operates over capacity in the 2019 Do Minimum weekday AM peak hour with aqueue of 52 PCUs. This shows the knockon effects will be a disaster.- St Michaels Park will become one way!(design 6), Road between St Michaels Park and TyndalAv closed. Turning St Michaels Park into one way will encourage vehicles to go faster. There is anursery in this road and many pedestrians.- Tyndall Avenue will become one way westward except for buses! This means a vehicle will driveup Woodland Road South and find they can only drive along Elton Road. This is ridiculous.- 15 parking spaces will be lost in Tyndall Avenue leaving only 4. This makes it difficult for visitorsto park- transport chapter 7 By creating a sense of 'deliberate ambiguity whereby there is no formalpriority, vehicles will give way to each other on an informal basis and potentially give way topedestrians as a courtesy'. But pedestrians should take priority! One only has to look at ColstonAvenue to see failure of this type of non-segregated space which upsets both cyclists andpedestrians.- In addition, a National Cycle Route (NCR4) runs along Woodland Road. Apparently the cycletrack through this space 'has been designed in such a way as to be easily penetrable bypedestrians while still providing a short, direct, traffic-free route for cycles'. But pedestrians shouldtake priority!- The needs of people with hearing difficulties, walking problems are not met with cyclists comingfrom behind and expecting the pedestrian to get out of the way. It is not pleasant.- very little for disabled. 2 car spaces, very little in way of ramps where there are steps- eg 6.10only shows new steps in doc design 6 14 but no ramps

None of the conservation societies like the design (most notably Historic England), many object tothe proposed layout of the roads. Community Involvement seems to have been ignored (eg cyclingproblems confirmed by the Green Councillor). This building does not justify demolishing theHawthorns as the facilities are already provided elsewhere so does not follow National policies. Itdoes not follow local policies regarding the style, setting and massing. It dominates the landscape.It ruins the setting of listed Bristol Grammar School. Pedestrianisation causes real problems forpedestrian safety, especially Bristol Grammar School students and makes a mess of traffic flow.There are already problems on St Michaels Hill, why add to them? I do not understand whypedestrianisation and a new building should be in the same application. Both schemes are equallyproblematic in different ways. This application must be refused.

on 2020-03-09  

are crossing or occupying the space and cyclists on the cycle route that runs through it. We recognise that this is a significant cycle route (National Cycle Route 4) so how this space is implemented is crucial.

The proposals incorrectly describe the proposed paved area along Woodland Road as a 'vehicle-free space'. However, bikes are vehicles and can cause harm to pedestrians like any other vehicles.

The current proposal shows the cycle route running right through the middle of, and flush with, the pedestrianised area and minimally distinguishable from it. The lesson from the shared use space in Bristol Centre is that this ambiguity is likely to lead to people inadvertently standing in the cycle route, with bikes weaving in and out to avoid pedestrians. It is more likely to create fear in pedestrians than caution in cyclists.

Because the entrance to the library faces Elton Road, pedestrian desire lines will occur between this entrance and the surrounding streets, or across from the Senate House. The side of the library facing Woodland Road has no entrances or exits, so desire lines are unlikely to cross the space arbitrarily.

The cycle route should be segregated by being placed on the west side of Woodland Road, with a major pedestrian crossing point aligned with the library entrance. This would leave a larger pedestrianised area outside the new Senate House steps that would be truly free of all traffic. Segregation should include a difference in surface level and treatment with adequate tactile edges and visual contrast for the visually impaired. Crossings should clearly indicate that pedestrians have priority using zebra markings, as already being adopted in other parts of the city where pedestrians have to cross cycle routes.

Drawbacks of changing the bus routeIt is proposed that the U1 bus is re-routed along Tyndall Avenue, where there would be a new 'bus hub' to also serve the 9 and 72 buses. The U1 would continue north to rejoin Tyndall's Park Road, meaning increased traffic through the narrow St Michael's Hill shopping area.

Re-routing the U1 bus also leads to the proposed re-alignment of the central refuge at the junction of Tyndall's P will make it harder for pedestrians to cross the road at a point where already vehicles frequently turn into Tyndall's Park Road without slowing.

We believe serious consideration should be given to combining the two-way cycle route along Woodland Road with a one-way (northbound only) bus route so that the frequent U1 bus would avoid the narrow streets and junctions of St Michael's Hill.

Resolving conflictsIt appears that the public realm proposals are trying to meet a number of conflicting requirements. The primary focus should be on safe passageway for pedestrians who are following clear desire lines across the space. For the University, these desire lines will include pedestrian access to the new library entrance. For the School they will include student access to bus and car pick-up and drop-off points in neighbouring

streets. Cyclists will want to continue to follow the existing cycle route through the space.

All these movements across the space are in conflict with the University desire to create an open space for students to congregate. We do not believe providing what is effectively an extension to the University campus should be at the expense of safety of movement through the public realm.

Summary The junction of Woodland Road / Tyndall Avenue / Elton Road should have clear

pedestrian priority marking - shared space is no longer good practice. The Woodland Road area needs better design to give pedestrian safety, with

segregation of the cycle route and zebra-marked pedestrian-priority crossings based on desire lines.

 Serious consideration should be given to the U1 bus route continuing to use Woodland Road.

There is also scope for the areas outside the library entrance and by the Senate House steps to offer seating, shelter, trees and other landscaping measures to increase the environmental contribution of the area.

Bristol Walking Alliance8 March 2020

on 2020-03-06   OBJECT

I object to both the demolition of a perfectly sound and typical Bristol building which is inkeeping with its surroundings in order to erect a huge and uncompromisingly attention seekingalternative.I also object to the accompanying plans to divert traffic around what the University now considersto be their 'campus'. This should not be allowed. I do not see the traffic along Tyndall's Avenue asbeing dangerous to students. If the University would like to be forward thinking in their use ofroads and pedestrians then they should adopt the principle of 'Shared Space' which has alreadybeen put forward in the past.

on 2020-03-06   OBJECT

My objections are wholly concerned with the closure of Woodland Road, which is barelymade note of in the drafted architects' vision drawings. With regard to the closing off of WoodlandRoad by the University, I have previously objected to this and continue to be opposed to theproposal. My reasons for opposing the closure is in part due the 'campusification' outlined andeven more so due to the further restricted access to the area and the inevitable, highly likelyknock-on effect this will have on trade. Every time roads have been cut off or diverted, forwhatever reason (fires, renovations, 'improvements', etc), there has been a related drop in footfalland sales. Neither the University, Bristol City Council or the Bristol BID appear the care enoughabout the Christmas Steps Arts Quarter as a residential or trading area to support us and none ofthe changes come with any kind of support or recognition of our plight as small, independenttraders. Trade here is hard enough as it is, these proposals will make being here yet more difficult.A campus university in itself Why does Bristol need to have an exclusive student/staff only campussite? It merely serves to further divide the city and its residents, with full and part-time from eachother. Community engagement is part of the remit of educational institutions and this is surelybetter served by being more open and welcoming to the surrounding communities. Furthermore,this feels like the first step in turning a public space into a private space, reducing access to nonuniversity people.

on 2020-03-05   OBJECT

I absolutely oppose this planning application as it will make access to theKingsdown/Cotham area even more difficult. If Tyndall Ave and St Michael's Park are made oneway it will mean that 3 of the 4 routes across to the Triangle and Whiteladies Rd will be one-wayonly as Cotham Hill is already one-way, leaving just Tyndall's Park Road as two-way. Theuniversity has taken our area by stealth with unrestricted buying up of housing for Departmentsand student accommodation which makes our area now too expensive for families. Myrtle Road isnow all student housing which results in a complete change in the community as they do notengage with local residents and seem to have scant regard for recycling. We are already reallyinconvenienced in this way without letting the University to totally take over the area to make acampus in the middle. If you come up Woodland Road from Park Row in order to miss thecomplicated Triangle system, there would be no right turn into Tyndall Ave and you would then bererouted back down the hill to Elmdale Road which then makes for a difficult right turn onto thebusy Tyndall's Park Rd to get back up towards Kingsdown and Cotham. Why should we have apedestrianised section of Woodland Road just so the students can walk more safely while lookingat their mobile phones! There will also be a loss of yet more parking spaces and it's difficultenough as it is for residents to find a space in that vicinity because the university have been givenso many permits.

The proposed building is totally out of character with the surrounding Victorian buildings of theSchool and will move the modernist style down that side of the hill towards the Triangle. It is evenhigher than the Senate house and looks like 3 stacked shoe boxes. I don't see why the existing

Social Sciences Library cannot be expanded as there is extra land on 3 sides and they could addsome stories to that even if it means underpinning. Surely that would be a cheaper option forthem. The University has expanded out of control to take an unacceptable number of studentswhich they cannot now accommodate. This has been to the detriment of the local residents in somany ways. It feels like an invasion! I question just how much the local residents would use theproposed space or visit the Drama collection.

on 2020-03-05   OBJECT

While I would not mourn the loss of the Hawthorns and welcome the opportunity toprovide display space for University collections such as the Theatre Collection, as a local residentI strongly object to the current plan.

The proposed building is far too big and its bizarre and brutal design is completely out of keepingwith the conservation area and with current planning policy.

The notion of 'public realm' is illusory. The land which the University seeks to turn into part of its'campus' is already open to the public. The proposed changes to road layout will cause obstructionto bus routes and in the case of St Michael's Park may even be dangerous.

on 2020-03-05   OBJECT

I object to the proposed development because it is an over-large building which it fails toreflect local character of area including scale and grain, fails to preserve and enhance theconservation area and because of its adverse impact locally and on the Bristol skyline.A new landmark is not required in this location. The Wills Tower serves as a locator for theuniversity and the creation of a new landmark will detract from the important and historic functionof the Wills Tower.The proposed building is of excessive height and has overbearingly large elements of buildingform compared not only with the dwarfed traditional residential buildings adjacent on Elton Roadbut also with the important larger local buildings, the listed Grammar School Hall and the modernSenate House.The proposed design is not particular to the location but uses a vocabulary which is currentlyfashionable. I feel that this particular building design is not appropriate in this situation; it does notsit well within the grain of the densely-developed surrounding area, but may be more acceptableas a stand-alone building in a landscape setting.I find the non-orthogonal design arbitrary, in that it does not form a comfortable relationship withnearby buildings, and inappropriate, whereas a design that aligns with adjacent buildings would sitmore comfortably on the site. The offset block which holds the top three floors and 7th floor plantrooms is a square proportioned block with large area of glazing. The proportions of this buildingelement are inelegant. Each storey height is 4.5 m; this has not been understood by many localresidents who have been told and have told me that the proposed building is only 6 storeys tall.The university is attempting to shoehorn too much accommodation into this site and this has led to

this oversized proposal.While accepting the requirement to provide study space for the rapidly increasing number ofstudents at the university, and the desirability of giving access to the local residents to access thecollection, I feel that the developer has failed to justify the sheer volume of accommodationproposed for this too-small site. Access to the café is not of significant community value.While I do not object to the principle of closing off Woodland Road to through-traffic, I feel that theproposed layout of the new public realm space is not good enough.The proposed library building lacks a formal relationship with Senate House building opposite; theproposed library entrance is located off centre, close to retained highway Woodland Road, insteadof related formally in the setting of the new public realm space. The proposal to close off thehighway to traffic should have been supported by creation of a high-quality formal public realmspace as the setting for the various buildings around it. The proposed design is not good enoughto justify the loss of local amenity through closure of the public highway.The design of the public space has failed to address the issue of the important cycle route throughthis space. Shared cycle and pedestrian space proposals are no longer an acceptable format. Asegregated solution is necessary to avoid accidents and incidents and to create a safe space forstudents, local residents, school students as well as the through traffic of commuting cyclists.

on 2020-03-05   OBJECT

out-dated. These days, most important texts are accessed online, and Google has provided a rich store of historical editions which have been scanned in. New buildings are sometimes needed to house large collections of archive material, but I am not aware that Bristol has any such large collection of original material (in contrast to the Bodleian in Oxford or the British Library in London). It seems unfortunate that the University should wish to wreck an inner-city architectural landscape for the sake of a concept that is already outdated.

My objections to this scheme are therefore threefold:: o it completely undermines the concept of an inner-city university that wishes to live in harmony with local communities o the architecture of the proposed new library building is brutal and dull, despite the quirky post-modern addition to the top floor. And it is utterly at odds with the surrounding architectural idiom of other buildingso The notion of a huge new university library building is misconceived in academic terms and already out of date.For these reasons, I would hope that the Planning Committee may ask the University to reconsider its proposal and instead submit a new proposal that fully addresses these three issues.David Thomas Professor Emeritus, University of Warwick

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

The building and changes to the surroundings are an aggressive, arrogant andunacceptable campusification of a handsome and varied part of Bristol with multiple users andresidents, of which Bristol University is only one.The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge seem to manage perfectly well (rather better in terms ofglobal reputation) without appropriating large areas of the town and streets for their ownvainglorious needs. One might even question whether Bristol would really want to aspire to therather lifeless campus style of Essex or Keele, worthy institutions though they may be.The jarring and gratuitous shape-making of the proposed building is just a phase the profession isgoing through, a regrettable one in my view. Buildings and their commissioning clients seekattention by bulk and by shock rather than by creative enhancement of their surroundings andelegant articulation of their purpose. The University's reputation for mediocre commissioning, sorichly established by the "Ugly Sisters" of Tyndall Avenue, will be increased by this clumsyoverbearing monolith which will surely quickly become as despised as the thoroughly mediocre,albeit much more inoffensive buildings that occupy the site at present. I don't have a problem witha library; it seems a good place for one, but it is quite possible to answer that brief and to complywith the adopted Masterplan and to produce a building of modesty and quality. It just needs a bitmore humility on the part of the University and its architects both of whom are clearly morefocussed on leaving their mark than on creating a thing of beauty and a worthy addition to thearea.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Bristol University New Library Hawthorns Hotel Site, Woodland - 20/00433/F - The Society'sresponse

The proposal1 Demolition of existing structures and redevelopment of the site to accommodate a newUniversity of Bristol Library to include archive and collections space, a cultural collections centre,research facility, working and study spaces, exhibition and events spaces and cafe. The creationof an enhanced public realm within the surrounding area between Woodland Road junction withTyndall Avenue, Elton Road and St Michael's Park.Summary

2.1 The Society supported the University's Masterplan which the Council adopted in 2006(SPD11). In October 2019 the Society responded to the University pre-planning application. Theresponse said that the Society continued to support a development of a library on the HawthornsHotel site but regretted that we could not support the current proposal.

2.3 The Library's scale would not relate sympathetically to the scale of the neighbouringproperties, which was the declared aim of the development in paragraph 4.10 - Strategic Move 9 -in the University's masterplan SPD11. The Library would cause significant harm to the threeadjoining Conservation Areas. National Planning Policy requires development to conserve and

enhance the Conservation Area. The University benefits substantially from the layout and scale ofthe surrounding Conservation Areas. A constant recommendation made in the University'spublicity is that it is attractively embedded within the city.

2.4 The second issue relates to the remodelling of Woodland Road and the junction with EltonRoad and Tyndall Avenue which the Society supports. The Society has made a separate responseto support the planning application - 20/00197/F Senate House - to redevelop the public realmfronting Senate House.

3 Planning background3.1 The Design Principles set out in Strategic Move 9 SPD11 said, "The Hawthorns site is a keysite on Woodland Road which will provide new purpose-built flexible accommodation for Universityuse. The site is prominently located at the convergence of routes and addresses, the new TyndallPlace. The design of a new development for the site will need to address a range of site conditionsincluding the following:Building Massing and Scale: A range of design options have been explored. It is believed that thesite could accommodate a development of between 3 and 7 storeys to allow building heights tostep up to reach the height of Senate House opposite. Bearing in mind the scale of the newdevelopment should relate sympathetically to the scale of neighbouring proprieties."And"There are a range of issues which influence the potential development of the site. The essentialcharacter of the Conservation Area is one of detached Victorian villas, which create a regularrhythm to the development along the streetscape of Elton Road and Woodland Avenue. It isimportant that the composition of a new building on the site responds to the nature of developmenton these streets and therefore avoids becoming too monolithic."

4 Key planning question 1 - Would the Library's larger mass of harm the Conservation Area?

4.1 The footprint of the Library would slightly exceed that of the masterplan. It is an acceptabledeviation. It is the Library's height and mass that concerns the Society. These are the comparativefigures. The new building area in allocation H in appendix 6 the SPD11 states that the grossinternal floor area (GIFA) is 8,630 m2. Option C in paragraph 4. 3 of Design and AccessStatement (D&AS) states that the GIFA is 14,300 m2. This is an uplift of 5,670 m2. . However,option C says that the uplift is 4,330 m2, up from the SPD's 8,630 m2. The Society hascorresponded with the University about the uplift. The University's view is that the Library hasbeen pushed into the ground to minimise its above ground area which reduces the apparent upliftof GIFA. It would be unprofitable to debate the precise percentage of uplift. The evidence tosupport the Society's objection to the mass is shown in two images. The first, from paragraph 4 ofSPD11, shows the University's original projection of the Library. The second, is copied from theUniversity D&AS and illustrates the Library's height and mass compared to the Senate building.

The Library is 36m tall, taller than the Senate House even though it starts from a lower base. The

SPD graphic shows a building scaled to relate sympathetically to the scale of the neighbouringproperties. The D&AS graphic shows a building not scaled sympathetically. We question thepurpose of asking the Council to adopt a masterplan if subsequent proposals depart from it asradically as does the Library. The Library will stand out as an unarticulated block on the end of theridge which includes Tyndall Avenue. The Senate house, the Wills Tower and the Wills PhysicsLaboratory create architecturally sophisticated outlines on the skyline. The Library would be anextremely large irregular-shaped block whose outline contrasts to its disadvantage with theoutlines of the other skyline buildings.

4.2 The University's Heritage Statement makes two assessments.(i) The value of the quality of Woodland Road character area of the Conservation Area as'moderate'. The Society agrees.(ii) Secondly, it assesses the degree of harm that the Library would cause to the ConservationArea. That too it assesses as 'moderate'. The Society does not agree.

4.3 The contextual drawings show the impact on the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School. Theproposed design does not, ' Mediate the scale between the 'domestic' villas and the 'civic'University building'. The Library would conflict with its immediate context and dominate thesurrounding urban grain.

4.4 The harm to the Conservation Areas would be 'substantial'. The site forms an important cornerof a regular estate of large, architecturally ambitious detached and semi-detached villas, many ofwhich the University has sensitively converted and reused. This grand estate laid out in thesecond half of the 19th century is the essence of the character of this sub-area of theConservation Area. Architectural Guides - Bristol - Andrew Foyle (2004) describes the area; "Itretains the character of a prosperous Victorian suburb". This character is a massive asset whichthe University appears to undervalue. Students and their parents particularly appreciate that theUniversity is imbedded into the city. The Library's scale would be a substantial step-change in bothmass and height. The massive elevations would overbear and dominate the upper parts of Eltonand Woodland Roads. The footprint and height of the proposed building in the WoodlandRoad/Elton Road area, even of excellent design, would cause substantial harm to theConservation Area.

5 Key planning question 2 - Would the public benefit of a Library with the larger mass outweigh theharm that it would cause to the Conservation Area?

5.1 This Library will not be a traditional pre-digital age library. Primarily, the Library will be alearning space to which the library stock will be an ancillary resource. How much of the book stockneeds to be on-site or off-site and recoverable through a databased inventory is a matter of choicefor the University. The Society's view reflects the storage policies of other conservators of largequantities of academic material who have implemented use off-site facilities.

5.2 We welcome the public access without barriers into the ground floor cafe / exhibition spaces.The Society does not want to appear unappreciative of this resource but questions how muchpublic use and therefore public benefit there would be of this space considering the Library'slocation and its principal use.

5.3 The University does not show that there is a public gain to outweigh the harm that the Librarywould cause to the Conservation Area. For staff and students one of the joys of Bristol Universityis that it is in a city and not remote on a campus. A balance must be struck between the needs ofthe city and the University. This huge building would respond only to the University's demands.The University has complete flexibility in the allocation of Library space. The size of the buildingshould determine the number of student study spaces; it should not be the other way about. Whatproportion of the book stock should remain on site is also flexible.

6 The public realm of the Woodland Road Tyndall Avenue Elton Road junctionThe Society supports the proposal to pedestrianise the area between Senate House and the newLibrary. We support the changes to Senate House whose principal entrance will move toWoodland Road. The access over wide steps that lead to the pedestrianised area will extend thepublic realm area with spill-out activity area. However, the entrance to the Library will not faceWoodland Road which will constrain the opportunity for place-making activity. The pedestrianisedarea is shown as a large paved area with no shelter except near the buildings. Deciduous trees inthe central area would provide shelter from sun and rain in summer and autumn as well ascontributing to carbon and pollution reduction.The treatment of the cycle route through the pedestrianised area needs careful design. Currentuse of this designated cycle route is relatively light but could increase. The interaction betweenpedestrians and cyclists will self-regulate to some extent, but even so careful design for safety isnecessary with clear differentiation in colour and texture, and possibly level. The illustrations donot show sufficient differentiation. Cyclists going north are going downhill and can easily pick upspeed, and consideration should be given to cycling speed-calming measures.We welcome the generous pedestrian crossing points on the raised tables at the junction ofWoodland Road, Elton Road and Tyndall Park Avenue and at the junction of Woodland Road withSt Michael's Park. But the proposals seem to be 'shared space' without demarcation. It is not clearthat they afford pedestrian priority. The demarcation needs to be clearer.The University has said that BGS parents may drop-off their children at the north end of theWoodland Road pedestrianised area. There are some parking spaces provided in the plans, butare they sufficient ? We support the proposal to remove some car parking on Tyndall Avenue."

7 Conclusion7.1 The Society's Major Sites Group are unanimously in favour of in the Society's support for theredevelopment of the Hawthorns and the construction of the Library. There was unanimoussupport of the evolution of the design of the elevations particularly the imaginative fenestration.The Society supports the proposed exterior materials.

7.2 The Society objects to the current application. We cannot support the current scheme whosesize is determined by the maximum that can be built on the site. This massive block would neitherprotect, conserve or enhance the Conservation Areas or contribute to the setting of the Nationallylisted Grade 2, Bristol Grammar School building and the former Baptist College. The mass of thisbuilding must have a better relationship with the older buildings whose varied styles include theornate listed Grammar School, the Jacobean style former Baptist College, the neighbouring villas,and Senate House.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly object to the plans. The University is flexing its incredible hold over the cityonce again. As a parent of 4 children at Bristol Grammar School , across the road from theproposed development, I do not agree that the University has fully considered the impact onstudents at the school.Let me be clear, I do not object to a sympathetic redevelopment of the site as I can see that it isunder used area. As a Chartered Librarian myself I fully support libraries in all their guises - but Ido not agree at all with the design of the new building. It is not in keeping with any of thearchitecture of the area, it is over baring , light zapping (even with the new plan to drop it down intothe basement) and jarring with the older , surrounding buildings of the University, school andnearby. It is absolutely hideous - why not be clever with your design? Look at how they rebuilt theend of the terrace on South Parade just off Whiteladies to incorporate the new M&S Food. Abrilliant and perfect example of how to combine old and new ( albeit on a smaller scale). I believethe current design will date horribly very quickly.IF the building gets approval , which I really hope it does not in its current form, then the buildingproposal plan has very little regard for its surrounds. Talking with various people at Arup and otherorganisations during the information period there is no consideration during building for thedisruption that demolition, deliveries and the amount of workers will have on the safe guarding ofthe children at Bristol Grammar School. Oh yes - private school children also need to be kept safetoo!! The noise, the danger to children to crossing roads near by and practical solutions have notbeen really listened to at all, despite engagement from the school. Can you honestly not see thatduring exam time having noisy construction work will not have an effect ? Also the the compromise

of the art block built where it is due to its perfect light will be severe due to lack of light if a newbuilding is put in place. Surely in this day in age you can be more clever about this? I am afraid Ican not see how your plan to bus workers in will work at any point if the development goes ahead.Workers store their kit in their vans - always have , always will. This plan will not work. We haveseen it on other developments the university has done with the Fry building for example - roadsget clogged with workers vans because they need their stuff nearby. this in turn compromisesschool access.My final point is around the traffic proposals. I strongly strongly strongly disagree with what isbeing proposed. I realise we are dealing with a snowflake generation and also overseas studentswho seem to find navigating their lives difficult and want to be dropped off right outside theirbuildings but creating a "hub" by blocking roads will cause traffic issues. Like it or not, BGS is aschool that children travel into - many of us ensure the children walk, catch public transport orshare lifts with others where possible but we have a school that runs from age 4-18. The infantand junior school children can not be just dropped off a distance away from the school and told towalk - that is wholly unreasonable. Children need their parents to have access to the school - it ishard enough creating a community at an inner city private school without you taking away theability for parents to communicate and socialise in the playground like other schools. Again - Irefuse to apologise for the fact that my children are at private school and need this ! Additionally ,the way that the university wants to shut Woodland Road would basically turn BGS into aroundabout, cause huge back ups onto the triangle, decrease parking capability ( which is alreadyminimal) and decrease air quality for the children. None of these are acceptable - particularly theair quality- and before you say it - far from all the traffic around the school is school related at all.Arup's argument that Tyndall Avenue can not be a two way road because of the bus stops beingtoo close together really does not stack up. Stagger the bus stops so that a two way road canwork? It really is that simple.

If anything from my comments - please take away that for all of the BGS parents - safeguardingour children is of paramount importance and the prime reason we object to the plans. We are not abunch of toffs who want "little johnny and Jemima " to be dropped off by 4 x4s - we are sensiblegroup of hard working parents who want to insure the best and safest educational environment forour children - full stop. The current plans for this building and the traffic management plans with itdo not fit with that at all.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Having 2 kids at BGS I'm concerned that the diaries of the uni are overriding otherconcerns. The impact will be huge for parents and children of BGS, both in terms of access andsafety. Construction phase will hamper drop offs, pick ups and cause general disruption to thearea. Post the long construction will be the same as car arrivals will be restricted in certaindirections, which as we've seen with the local RPS, only moves the congestion and parking todifferent surrounding areas. If Elton Road became a pedestrian area, it would at least mitigatesome safety concerns although congestion problems will still apply.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Objecting on the basis of the traffic plans that will direct a large amount of additionaltraffic down Elton Road; a road that goes *through* Bristol Grammar School.

On safety grounds: Children cross this road, unaccompanied, to get to music lessons.

On health grounds: Additional pollution, particularly in the form of Fine Particulate Matter, whichexacerbates asthma and is particularly harmful to children.

I don't think your traffic survey methods have correctly yielded the increase in traffic. The dates ofsurvey points MCTC17, MCTC18, are when there were roadworks on Woodlands Road, whichresulted in traffic jams and consequently a lower level of 'traffic' (in terms of number of vehicles)than usual as regular users of the route, or people using traffic-aware satnav, will have routedaround the area.

In addition, you have not forecast for increased diesel traffic as private vehicles will skirt theboundary of the ULEV planned for central Bristol. This will 'push' significant amounts of West-bound traffic further north than the zone and Elton Road (followed by a right-turn into Elmdale,then a left towards Whiteladies) will become a 'rat-run'.

I urge a reconsideration of the traffic forecast, taking into account a larger proportion of privatelyowned diesel vehicles. Perhaps don't pedestrianise Woodland road.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Plans endanger children at Bristol Grammar School with road closures and shuntingadditional traffic and cycles down Elton Road

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Proposed redevelopment of Bristol University Library.The proposed new library building is far too large in relation to the other buildings in the area andits design is quite out of keeping with the surrounding buildings and would spoil the character ofthe area.

The closure of Tyndall Avenue and St Michael's Park to two way motor traffic.As someone who uses this road to walk home at night when it is very quiet it would make me feelquite unsafe without motor users passing by. As a local resident I have to travel through this areaby car and it is already very busy so while taking out roads might well suit university users duringthe day it is very inconvenient day, night and weekend to local residents.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

My children are at Bristol Grammar School and the UoB library will have a detrimentaleffect on their schooling. The increase in footfall around Woodland and Elton Road means thatwhen they are moving around their classes from BGS to lessons on Elton Road the congestionwith student traffic will be horrendous. The closure of Woodland Road will mean traffic will bepushed out onto the Triangle during school drop off and pick ups... an area which is already highlycongested. The library will also make the school more or less penned in with University buildingalmost on all sides. Our children are smaller and younger than UoB students and I feel that theirwelfare will be compromised with a higher footfall of students in this area. I also feel that the librarybuilding itself is not in keeping with the older local buildings and the height of it will over shadowthe historic buildings of BGS.

on 2020-03-04   SUPPORT

I would like to support this project. I think it is a fantastic development for the city andthe area. With the new Library building the public will be able to engage more with the University,attend events and learn more about what University has to offer to the city. I work at the Universityand part of my role is to organise cultural events. I am really excited about the fact there will be aneasy to get to space where students and Bristol community will be able to come together. Wehave a very multicultural city and a multicultural University - the Library will allow the city anduniversity communities to merge. The public realm will also add a wonderful pedestrian area to thecity, and easier access to wonderful Royal Fort Garden, which is a hidden gem

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I do not feel the new building is in keeping with the local architecture and as a result willbe an eyesore. Whilst I do not object to development of buildings they should be in keeping withthe local style and scale of buildings. I also have concerns about the impact on local roads andalso the environment during construction phase

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Whilst the University brings lots of money into the City surely they can't be allowed toget away with this. The building proposals are unsympathetic to residents and other regular usersof the area. The building itself looks ugly and will block the light to so many of the other buildings.The traffic in the area is already highly congested and making the proposed area pedestrianisedwill only serve to make the area grid locked. Forcing traffic down a road that runs literally down themiddle of a school housing 4-18 years old is madness. There are children of all ages crossing thatroad to get to lessons all day long. Even if cars get down Elton Road without running a child over,they will then find themselves queuing at the junction near the triangle with that zebra crossingsitting right over it. It's utter chaos around that area already and this will only make it worse. Whilsta new library may well serve the university well, please rethink the design of the building, at leastmake it less high and please do not go ahead with the pedestrianisation across Woodland Road.University aged adults are much more capable of crossing a road than the school aged kids whogo to the school next door.

on 2020-03-04   SUPPORT

This application represents an outstanding opportunity for the residents of Bristol to gaina world class facility which will be of benefit all sectors of society.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

There is a danger to pupils with respect to traffic in passing the proposed scheme. Thiswill particularly affect BGS students. The Health and Safety issues do not appear to have beenconsidered.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

The university certainly needs a better, more accessible facility to store valuablearchives such as the Theatre archives. It also needs more study space for the students.Incorporating better public access and a cafe are also good ideas.

However, the plans for this building are ugly and not at all in keeping with the surrounding heritagebuildings of the conservation area (NPPF para 200). The building is much too tall and cuboid, andif this block design must be used, it should be at least 30% shorter. The top block is obtrusive andoverpowering, both from nearby and from a distance (visual impact assessment).

There is a significant amount of glass involved, and as mentioned by another party, this does notseem to have been properly considered in the plans. A library with significant amounts oftransparent glass would provide little protection for the books from sunlight; and excessive sunlightcould actually overheat the building, as happened with the French National Library. In addition, theglass design in France failed to account for condensation, another threat to delicate books.

Although the pedestrianisation of the area and reduction in motor traffic is good in principal, largeexpanses of land which are empty in the evening actually pose a risk to students and the public,especially women, when having to cross them late at night (eg after studying in the library in theevening). The provision of a cafe or small bistro which is open in the evening, or some studenthousing or affordable accommodation so the area is not deserted at night, should be consideredwithin the scheme.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I appreciate that the Hawthorns site requires redevelopment so that it provides a fit forpurpose library and study centre for the University but I strongly object to these proposals for thefollowing reasons:

1. Due to the proposed massing and design, the proposed buildings would be harmful to thecharacter and appearance of the Conservation Areas and the setting of highly-graded heritageassets such as the Grade II listed buildings within Bristol Grammar School. Furthermore theuniversity has not demonstrated why a scheme cannot be delivered which better aligns with themassing and design proposed by the SPD11 for the site. I wholeheartedly agree with HistoricEngland's concersn regarding the massing of the proposals.

2. The height of the proposed development is entirely out of scale to the neighbouring villas onElton Road as it will be over twice as high as the existing Hawthorns building and will be over 30 mhigher than the Bristol Grammar School buildings on Elton Road. It will also be over 8m higherthan Senate House, street level views will be significantly adversely effected and the building willhave a negative impact on the skyline of Bristol as there will be sight lines from the Harbourside tothe Downs.

3. There will be significant overlooking of the neighbouring Bristol Grammar School andparticularly the Paddocks play areas within the school and as far as the senior school open areas.

4. The University is not a campus University and I strongly object to the University seeking to stopup part of Woodland Road to create a pedestrian square and in effect a campus. The Universityprecinct operates in this area in conjunction with a number of other local businesses and schoolsand these proposals show no consideration for these other users. This is not an appropriatelocation for a campus and these proposals give the impression that the University has no respector concern for its neighbours. The proposals, if approved, will direct a significant amount ofadditional traffic down Elton Road which is used by children aged from 4 to 18. In particular theinfants school within Bristol Grammar School is located on Elton Road and infant children regularlycross this road to access other facilities within the school. The proposals are dangerous,unacceptable in highway terms and will adversely affect air quality in the area.

5. This area provides many access routes to other parts of the City such as Cotham, Kingsdownand Gloucester Road and these access routes will be severely impeded and impact on the widerhighway network in the area.

6.No attempt has been made to address the dangerous junction of Woodland Road and TyndallsPark Road. The junction is already very difficult for pedestrians to cross and the increased trafficflow generated by the proposals will make the area even more hazardous.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

The proximity of the proposed site to the neighbouring Bristol Grammar School seemsto have been largely overlooked in the design and layout of the development. The style and size ofthe proposed development is wholly at odds with the character of the surrounding buildingsincluded some listed buildings. The impact of the road changes would force traffic past the schoolincreasing air pollution and decreasing air quality for students as well as creating more dangerouscrossing conditions for infant children who have to cross Elton Road several times a day. The roadchanges also funnel traffic towards the already congested "Triangle" which on a bad day leavestraffic queuing up Elton Road even with Woodland Road remaining open to use.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Strongly disagree with these plans.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal. The university does not need to make this area into acampus for the benefit only of themselves and their students. This is a residential area and I thinkthis proposal with have a huge negative effect on the surrounding area. The university is takingover this area and has no regard for BGS school nearby, local residents or people commuting intothe area. Whilst I do not object to the university having a library or a redevelopment of the existingbuilding this site is not the place for a library of that size and scale.

The building does not fit into the surrounding area and is too dominant, blocking light to otherbuildings and ruining the landscape.

As a parent of two children at BGS school I am concerned about more traffic being forced downElton road and the other roads which are already congested. I concerned about the safety ofpupils from the school when crossing this already busy road and the pollution, noise and increasein population this proposal will bring.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly object to the plans. As a parent of children at Bristol Grammar School , acrossthe road from the proposed development, I do not agree that the University has fully consideredthe impact on students at the school. It is too largw and not at all in keeping with the rest of thearea and buildings. I really hope that it does not get approval in its current form, but am also veryconcerned about the impact that building works will have on the area, in particular the school. Thenoise, pollution, traffic are all huge hazards to the children at the school, their safety, and theirlearning, which I do not think has been adequately considered.

I also strongly disagree with the traffic proposals. I have young children and need access to theschool. Again this has not been properly thought through and there are so many problems andissues with the suggestions

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

My child is a pupil at Bristol Grammar school, and I believe that this proposed work willhave a huge impact on the pupils of the school both through the building works and thereafter. Ibelieve that the proposed plans have not taken into account the complexities of dropping childrenat school. As an independent school, pupils often live some distance away without access topublic transport & it is therefore a necessity for parents to take them by car. The youngest childrenare just 4 years old & there is an expectation that parents park their cars in order to physically walktheir child into the school buildings & collect them in the same manner in the afternoon. There isno acknowledgement of this in the plans.The air pollution & noise for the children and other People living & working in the vicinity will besignificant through the building works.I oppose to this strongly.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I have a young child that attends Bristol Grammar School and I am concerned about theimpact of the demolition. There will be increased noise, increased traffic including heavyconstruction traffic to what is an already very busy traffic filled area. I am of the opinion that theschool children's safety will be at risk. The new library building is too big and will severely impactthe local area.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

My children attend Bristol Grammar School. The scale and proximity of the proposedstructure poses significant risks to the safety and well-being of the children at Bristol grammarschool. The structure in its current form overshadows the school campus and blocks out significantlight and reduces the amount of greenery for these children. I do not believe that the traffic flowhas been adequately researched and there are significant concerns that there will be increasedtraffic between school sites. There are no pedestrian or controlled crossings for children to crossduring the day from one part of the school to another. As with many other parts of central Bristolthere are concerns about levels of air pollution both from nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter.The scale and duration of the building works will significantly worsen this.

Could the university consider a different structure and rethink plans for traffic? Extend thepedestrian zone to encompass BGS?

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I have many concerns as a parent of three young children at Bristol Grammar School.

Concern over adequacy of traffic assessment and underestimated or incorrect journeys made byparents. Drop off points not workable for infant and junior school children. Not safe and notfeasible.

loss of light to art building and school groundsSafety of children and pedestrians crossing the roadTraffic implications - refer to pedestrian crossing next to Nero traffic backing up. Increase in trafficunacceptable.Children's safety with increase pedestriansArchitecture not consistent with Elton road/woodland road / 500 year old school!!Hazardous conditions during building -Large cranes over school for many yearsLoss of parking

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

My Children are students of Bristol Grammar School. The proposed plans will in myopinion endanger young children's lives and disrupt their education. Building works will be takingplace during exam times which are likely to be noisy and distracting. The Children (some as youngas 4) will need to walk through a building site every school day.

The proposed changes to the road system will push more traffic down Elton road ( the site of theinfant school) where many young children will be crossing regularly.

Parking on the roads that are being pedestrianised are not as I can see being replaced puttingmore pressure on the existing spaces.

This is not a well thought out plan and a risk to the safety of children.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I object to the plans.. As a parent at Bristol Grammar School , I do not agree that theUniversity has fully considered the impact on students at the school. I do not object to asympathetic redevelopment of the site however I do not agree with the design of the new building.It is not in keeping with any of the architecture of the area, it is over baring , light zapping (evenwith the new plan to drop it down into the basement) and jarring with the older , surroundingbuildings of the University, school and nearby. should the building get approval , which I reallyhope it does not in its current form, then the building proposal plan has very little regard for itssurrounds.My final point is around the traffic proposals. I strongly disagree with what is being proposed.creating a "hub" by blocking roads will cause traffic issues. Like it or not, BGS is a school thatchildren travel into - many of us walk, catch public transport or share lifts with others wherepossible but we have a school that runs from age 4-18. The infant and junior school children cannot be just dropped off a distance away from the school and told to walk - that is totallyunreasonable. Children need their parents to have access to the school - it is hard enoughcreating a community at an inner city private school without you taking away the ability for parentsto communicate and socialise in the playground like other schools. the way that the universitywants to shut Woodland Road would basically turn BGS into a roundabout, cause huge back upsonto the triangle, decrease parking capability ( which is already minimal) and decrease air qualityfor the children. None of these are acceptable - particularly the air quality.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Major points of objection- scale of building overshadows neighbouring Bristol grammar school and blocks light to thebuildings and school grounds- design of building is not in keeping with architecture on woodland road or Elton road or the 500year old Bristol Grammar school building opposite. It would damage local aesthetic environmentand conservation of Bristols traditional buildings- pedestrianisation of woodland road will have significant traffic impacts to university Road andElton road. School traffic disperses around this area with university and city traffic. Blocking thiswould create a one way system with little movement for busses and a huge increase in standingcar pollution..- highway safety - traffic assessment of the school traffic is insufficient. The proposal of drop offareas are unrealistic as children are infant and junior school age and parents park to walk theirchildren to school. Parents would therefore not use the area as the plan suggests. This has notbeen designed with the true use of these roads in mind. Any traffic assessment model designedwith these features would be incorrect and will not reflect the true picture and the reality of trafficmovement should this plan go ahead- Traffic generation - the huge increase in student numbers is concerning in an already busy citycentre location would result in an increase in traffic and pollution.- pedestrian crossings on Elton road with huge numbers of students would result in traffic standstillwhich already exists on the pedestrian crossing on Queens Avenue.- pollution would increase due to reasons above which should be a huge consideration due to high

pollution levels in Bristol and current plans to reduce this in the centre. This area is adjacent to oneof the highest areas of pollution if the diesel ban goes ahead in the air pollution management planthis will also have a huge impact on how traffic flows. It is very reasonable to expect the areaaround the school - which has both junior and infant children- to become one of the worst areas ofair pollution. Surely this should be avoided as a priority.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly object to these proposals for the following reasons:

Detrimental to Conservation AreaDue to the proposed massing and design, the proposed buildings would be harmful to thecharacter and appearance of the Conservation Areas and the setting of highly-graded heritageassets such as the Grade II listed buildings within Bristol Grammar School. The size and height ofthe proposed building would conflict with it's immediate context and dominate the surroundingurban architecture. Furthermore the university has not demonstrated why a scheme cannot bedelivered which better aligns with the massing and design proposed by the SPD11 for the site. Iwholeheartedly agree with Historic England's concerns regarding the massing of the proposals.

Adverse effects on skylineThe height of the proposed development is entirely out of scale to the neighbouring villas on EltonRoad as it will be over twice as high as the existing Hawthorns building and will be over 30 mhigher than the Bristol Grammar School buildings on Elton Road. It will also be over 8m higherthan Senate House, street level views will be significantly adversely effected and the building willhave a negative impact on the skyline of Bristol as there will be sight lines from the Harbourside tothe Downs.

Infringement of privacy for school childrenThere will be significant overlooking of the neighbouring Bristol Grammar School and particularly

the Paddocks play areas within the school and as far as the senior school open areas; thisproposal does not therefore consider the safeguarding, safety and privacy of neighbours.

Dominance of University space to detriment of local residentsThe University is not a campus University and I strongly object to the University seeking to stop uppart of Woodland Road to create a pedestrian square and in effect a campus. The Universityprecinct operates in this area in conjunction with a number of other local businesses and schoolsand these proposals show no consideration for these other users. This is not an appropriatelocation for a campus and these proposals give the impression that the University has no respector concern for its neighbours. The university students are only in Bristol for 7 months of the yearand this proposal does not adequately take into consideration the adverse impact of thisdevelopment on the lives of neighbours.

Additional traffic directed down roads used by school childrenThe proposals, if approved, will direct a significant amount of additional traffic down Elton Roadwhich is used by children aged from 4 to 18. In particular the infants school within Bristol GrammarSchool is located on Elton Road and infant children regularly cross this road to access otherfacilities within the school. The proposals are dangerous, unacceptable in highway terms and willadversely affect air quality in the area.

Disruption to wider traffic routesThis area provides many access routes crossing the City such as to and from the harbourside(and south west of the city), Cotham, Kingsdown and Gloucester Road and these access routeswill be severely impeded and impact on the wider highway network in the area.

Danger to pedestriansNo attempt has been made to address the dangerous junction of Woodland Road and TyndallsPark Road. The junction is already very difficult for pedestrians to cross and the increased trafficflow generated by the proposals will make the area even more hazardous.

Noise and Air PollutionI object to the size and scale of the proposed build due to the levels of noise and air pollution thatthe build will cause over a protracted period of time. In particular, during exam periods for studentsof Bristol Grammar School and for children in the infant and junior school who will be exposed tothese pollutants at a very formative age for a prolonged period of time. The effect on children andstaff living in the shadow of the build has not been considered adequately and should be taken into consideration more fully before proceeding.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

The road network around the university and bristol Grammar School school iscongested already. The proposed new road system protects the adults of the university howeverputs more risk to minors who need to walk around bristol Grammar school.The current proposal will put more risk to pedestrians in the area and create a huge trafficcongestion issue.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I object to these proposals for the following reasons:

1. The proposal is fundamentally at odds with the Bristol 'One City Plan', which seeks "to bringtogether public, private, and third sector partners within Bristol to make the city a fair, healthy andsustainable city." By effectively creating a siloed campus area, the University is ignoring the needsof its local partners and is certainly not bringing them together to deliver a development which isfair to its neighbours. Given the importance given to these principles within the One City Plan, Ifind it hard to believe that this development would have the backing of the Mayor's office becauseit is at odds with the ethos of the city as a whole.2. The effect of stopping up Woodland Road will be a significant volume of traffic being forceddown Elton Road, which is the main entrance for Bristol Grammar School for children ranging inage from 4 to 18. Not only will these proposals have an adverse impact on local air quality forschoolchildren, they will also create an increased hazard for children crossing the road. As theschool has facilities on each side of the road, there are regular requirements for children(particularly those aged 4 to 7 in the infant school) to cross the road, so to introduce an increasedrisk of traffic incident involving young children seems totally at odds with some of the recentinitiatives within the city (such as the 20mph limits to improve road safety). Bristol has alsorecently declared a 'Climate Emergency' and is currently struggling with the threat of legal actionfrom the Government over regular breaches of regulatory NO2 levels. To create another potentialhotspot of localised air pollution is mindless and appears to show no cognisance of the biggerpicture of air pollution issues within the city. In addition to impacts on Elton Road, no attempt has

been made to improve the dangerous junction of Woodland Road and Tyndalls Park Road. Thejunction is already dangerous, particularly for pedestrians crossing and the increased traffic andpedestrian flow generated by the proposals will make the area even more hazardous.3. The proposals are at odds with the character and appearance of the local Conservation Area,most notably the buildings within Bristol Grammar School and (ironically) many of the buildingsbelonging to the University of Bristol. Historic England has already voiced concerns over themassing of the buildings, and these need to be taken into account to avoid riding roughshod overthe planning guidance which is in place to protect the settings of exactly the type of heritage thatwe have in this area of Bristol.4. The height of the proposed development will be over twice as high as the existing Hawthornsbuilding and will be over 30 m higher than the Bristol Grammar School buildings on Elton Road, sois completely out of keeping with the existing skyline. This area of Bristol should not be subject tosuch high skylines because if will adversely affect street level views not only in the locality, butalso from the wider city (including views from the Downs and the harbour). Bristol has historicallynot entertained construction of high buildings due to the impact on the historic skyline, and anychange of this approach should be confined to areas where the benefit can clearly bedemonstrated to outweigh the negative effect (as can be seen in some of the proposed TempleQuarter developments).5. Many of the open areas of Bristol Grammar School will be overlooked by the new building. It isinappropriate to create a new development which has direct sightlines into school play areas,particularly 'the Paddock' which is used by children within the Junior School - there aresafeguarding and security issues posed in this regard.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal. The university is part of the city and not a campus. Thepedestrianisation of the area is for the benefit of students (only here part of the year) and isdetrimental to local residents and local school children. Of particular concern is the newtraffic proposals. This will force traffic into surrounding areas with congestion, pollution and safetyan issue, in particular around the school. The size of the building is not fitting for the area and willovershadow the listed buildings nearby

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Whether or not a new library is required or desirable for the University - the currentproposal appears very unsuited to the area. Both the scale of the building itself and the ambition toco-opt so much of the surrounding area for what is quite evidently to the primary benefit of theUniversity.

The building itself is unsympathetic to its surroundings. It is too big and architecturally out of step.

The attempt to carve out a campus environment in the centre of a busy and well establishedcommunity also feels undesirable. Such an overbearing University footprint feels hard to justifyagainst the significant disruption, traffic congestion and impact on the local community.

A significantly more modest proposal would be far more suitable. There are many ways theUniversity can provide leading library and archiving facilities to its students. The current proposalto try and centre everything into a giant development on the Hawthorns site is no doubt the easiestoption for the University but it would be a dreadful solution for the local area and the city of Bristol.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

Building is too tall for the conservation area.Pushing traffic past BGS will cause accidents and not be safe for children.Traffic will not flow.

on 2020-03-04   OBJECT

I strongly oppose this new development. The design is not in keeping or evensympathetic to the surrounding architecture, it's overbearing in size even with the new proposeddrop in height by digging deeper. It will also have a huge negative impact in blocking light from theart department at BGS. The design is trueing ugly and will date horribly. It jarrs horribly against thebeautiful and historically important Great Hall. It looks like it's there to shock and dominate.

There has been woefully inadequate consideration of surrounding road usage and parking issues,noteably on University Rd and Elton Rd. closing Woodlands Rd to traffic and making Tyndalls Rdone way will have an enormously negative impact on these roads and turn BGS into a busy,choked roundabout, further increasing traffic jams and the already high pollution levels which goescontrary the City Council plans to reduce pollution in the city centre.

Has the additional particulate pollution that will be generated during demolition and constructionbeen assessed / taken into consideration/ mitigated in any way? Children from the ages of 4-18 atBGS, staff, parents, University students, general public.. we are all expected to happily breath thisstuff in??!!

I would support a much smaller library that was designed to enhance the asthetics of the area,with a well thought through traffic and road / parking plan / pollution reducing planning.. but thissmells of the University yet again throwing its weighty power to make the council do what it wants,with no regard to anything and anyone else.. and create an absolute jarring eyesore and make life

more difficult and unpleasant for everyone who lives and works or goes to school within theimmediate vicinity.

object object object on every level.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

The proposed library is far too large and dominant as well as being of a design moresuited to an industrial estate than the University area.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

I entirely concur with Kingsdown Conservation Group.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

I object to the library building on the basis of:- excessive height, scale massing and size for the site.- incongruous cubic design incompatible with the site, its location and surrounding buildings- substantial harm to the character of the conservation area.- discordance with the wider cityscape.- conflict with SPD11 and the development plan.- confused, confusing and ill-considered proposals for road closures disregarding the theinterconnection of the purported 'campus' with the rest of Bristol and the movements of localresidents.- failure to listen to earlier 'consultations'.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

I object to the library building on the basis of:- excessive height, scale massing and size for the site.- incongruous cubic design incompatible with the site, its location and surrounding buildings- substantial harm to the character of the conservation area.- discordance with the wider cityscape.- conflict with SPD11 and the development plan.- confused, confusing and ill-considered proposals for road closures disregarding the theinterconnection of the purported 'campus' with the rest of Bristol and the movements of localresidents.- failure to listen to earlier 'consultations'.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

-Re 20/00433/FThe University seems to think it owns the area around Tyndall Avenue. It really needs to rethink itsplans for a takeover of the area. I fully support those who live in the area and will find roadclosures for pedestrian precincts are going to make life intolerable and dangerous. I am oldenough to remember Woodland Road as residential properties. Thirty or forty years on, theuniversity has bought up everything it can get it hands on and now wishes to close off the wholearea as 'private'. True to form, the university has impinged on other areas as well especially nearthe halls of residence near Stoke Hill and Parrys Lane.While a new library is very welcome I hope the planners will tell the university to back off and thinkagain about the overall plan. A new modern building would be great if it does not tower over all itssurroundings. The old library, however iconic, definitely needs replacing as it is hideous tombstonearchitecture. However, the mocked-up photo of the proposed design resembles shippingcontainers piled on each other. Maybe the architects could go to the continent and view thefantastic new public buildings achieved there.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

I, like a lot of students at the University of Bristol, have a sentimental attachment to TheHawthorns and I question why it has to be completely demolished. The Hawthorns' Terrace Barand its pretty little garden is the university's main shared social space used equally by both staffand students - which is valuable in creating a sense of cohesion and shared identity.

The refurbishment of the nearby Maths Building, which maintained the frontage, shows what canbe done with an existing building. That's a beautiful conversion.

Given we're in a conservation area - something that makes Bristol attractive and special comparedto concrete-heavy campus universities elsewhere - shouldn't we be trying to conserve and adaptwhat we have?

What I don't understand is why the proposed new building has to be so ugly - this is the generalview of students I talk to - particularly given its size and prominence on Bristol's skyline.

So I object to the new building given the damage it will do to the conservation area and to Bristol'sskyline.

on 2020-03-03   SUPPORT

As a frequent user of the current library and as a teacher of many students I stronglysupport this proposal. The University is thriving and has expanded in terms of students and staffnumbers over many years. The current library does not have the space and does not have theoutward-facing facilities a civic University should have. The proposed new library has, amongmany other essential improvements, an exhibition space that is designed to benefit not just theUniversity but the city of which it is a part. Above all, our students have time and again given lowapproval scores for our current library provision: a University should put its students first, and it isto be hoped that Bristol city council will allow the University to do so.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

The university has been developing in this area for years now and no consideration hasbeen made for the residents in this area that have to live with the contentious noise, pollution anddisruption. roads have been closed or partially blocked for years causing constant traffic jams inthe area, but when it suits the university, such as their open days, they are able to unblock theroads as all they seem to do is store things there and use it as parking for the workmen.

The building is too big and will overshadow the surrounding properties changing the character ofthe surroundings

No consideration has been given to the pedestrianization of woodland road and the impact it willhave on local residents that use it to commute

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

This will have a negative effect on the health, safety and well-being of the children ofBristol Grammar School both during construction and after. It appears at odds with the City's cleanair aims. I'm worried for the safety of children (age 4 to 18) who use Elton Road and cross it toaccess different parts of the school since traffic (and construction vehicles during construction) willbe forced down that road .

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

This will clearly have a negative impact on the school children at Bristol Grammar.Health and safety will be impacted both during construction and post construction. Elton Roadwhere the school is split in facilities is of particular concern as children need to cross at all times ofday. It also seems at odds with the city's clean air aims, as these plans will cause moreconcentrated traffic. The university should continue to utilise office and vacant retail facilitiesincorporating wider community benefits. They should also further invest in their campus studyfacilities out of town to mitigate the need for the proposed plans and reduce pollution through theneed of those students to enter into the centre of town.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

This proposed Bristol University new library would appear to an utter 'monstrosity' andshould not be agreed. It does not fit in to Bristol and shows the utter disregard of the University tothe city. I am an alumni of the University and am concerned at the plans for the University inBristol for the future. The University needs to develop carefully - this appears to be more about thedesign companies and how far they are permitted to go than what is actually needed. Bristol hasalready approved some horrific developments in the past -see the City Centre for example anddoes not need this. Many others I am sure would also see this as completely unacceptable.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

The proposed development of a new library is a good thing ,however, the proposedbuilding is unsightly and HUGE and would detract from the beauty of the area.The University of Bristol has at its disposal a number of buildings which are listed and theproposed library does not sit well with an area which is architecturally beautiful.The pedestrianisation of the road would only serve to create further gridlock elsewhere and as atrader of Colston Street, I am fully aware of the need to keep traffic flowing.The existing 'Hawthorns' building could,I'm sure, be improved with sensitive development to serveas perfectly functional library.This city has sadly been at the hands of many planners who have seen fit to terminate manyattractive elements in favour of "progress" only to realise that in hindsight , a more sensitive andlogical approach would be more appropriate (Totterdown for one!!! )The University doesn't need a Campus to function...It works wonderfully as a city university with allof its wonderful old quirky,beautiful buildings.SA John

on 2020-03-03   SUPPORT

The new university library will be a fantastic amenity for the city of Bristol. I haverecently joined Bristol University as a member of staff in the Theatre Collection and the plans forthe library were an important factor in attracting me to the organisation. This imaginative schemewill enhance the life of the city by enabling the public to access and enjoy the University's world-class archive and museum collections. Our current facilitites limit how much we can share theseamazing resources with residents and visitors; so much more will be possible in the new building.The library will be an important asset for the university, providing students and staff with excellentstudy facilities. The exhibition, collaboration and relaxation spaces will provide opportunities forinspiration and learning for everyone, and I am therefore very pleased to support this planningapplication.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

I am very concerned about several aspects of this proposal. The change to the roadsand the traffic chaos that will ensue will make it very difficult and dangerous for our children whoattend Bristol Grammar School. I need to be able to drop my children safely at school, they are notold enough to walk on their own and as a parent I have a right to be able to park close by and takemy children to and from their entrance. The road proposals suggest making huge changesincluding one way systems that simply do not consider the needs Or safety of anyone at BristolGrammar School. It will create huge traffic jams, a lot of air pollution and huge time issues for usbusy working parents trying to juggle working life and school times.At a time when we need to be thinking about the environment and air quality, causing cars to sit injams for longer with their engines running is simply not acceptable, particularly as this will causethe air quality to deteriorate, potentially then causing health problems such as asthma for thechildren. There is a known link between asthma and air pollution.The lorries, air pollution, dust, noise will all have significant and worrying impacts on theenvironment, noise and light levels, clean air, safety crossing roads, the environment which allowsstudy and exams to take place, and general health. The welfare of the students at the school issimply not being considered.Over the years the school has developed facilities that maximise the use of the light and space tocreate fantastic learning environments for our children. The enormous building proposed is notonly ugly and not at all in keeping with the surrounding buildings, but it is huge and overshadowsmany school buildings, and as a result affects the facilities for our children's learning Theuniversity has many other properties and land and why these sites cannot be used for this building

project I cannot understand.University Students should be able to cross a road safely (although many don't as they are toobusy looking at their phones or chatting), and yet everything is being done to make theirenvironment safer instead, whilst leaving our children at risk.i am highly concerned and oppose the proposals.

on 2020-03-03   OBJECT

As a Bristol University graduate and regular visitor to Bristol I am very familiar with theUniversity surroundings. This proposed new building in my opinion does not fit well within thesurroundings of Woodland Road. Its height and design clash with its surroundings and it willdominate the Wills Memorial building which is so symbolic of the University and the City.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

I object in the strongest terms to the development of this building as it currently stands.The proposal is not in keeping with the buildings in the area, and would completely dominate thewhole aspect of the area in a way that detracts from it, not compliments it.Elton Road and the attractive buildings that line it would be overshadowed, literally, by this buildingwhich is too high, too large and seemingly pays no heed to surrounding architecture. The re-routing of traffic that is suggested in surrounding roads, and the increased footfall of individualsusing this huge building would negatively impact the school and residents in the immediate area.Parking for residents and school users is already challenging in this area, not least because ofstudents parking in areas they should not. This massively enlarged building would only exacerbatethis situation. It appears that there has been no consideration for residents or school users in theplanning of this building - it may benefit the university but at huge cost to everyone else who hasjust as much right to access and use this area.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

As planned, the building is too vast and overbearing. The planned change to traffic flow/ road closures is unacceptable and undesirable. The university is slowly squeezing out all viableaccess to BGS school and the current plans pose a real danger to child safety both during theworks and as a consequence.The impact on traffic (and therefore added pollution levels whilst traffic builds up) is alsounacceptable and should be avoided.Careful consideration should be given to the school and its pupils during any work phases, withsafety being paramount.At present, the planned works and outcome is not suitable for the area and needs to be rethoughtwith particularly constructive input for the school, pupils and general surroundings.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

My husband and I are very concerned as to the impact of this in terms of access toBristol Grammar School and the surrounding area. We live very near this site and anticipate alarge negative impact on daily as well as school life. We urge you to reconsider

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

This is the wrong building in the wrong location, both in terms of scale and impact. TheUniversity has been carrying out an extensive programme of works in the immediate vicinity of theHawthorns for many years now, causing disruption in the form of noise, mess, loss of parkingspaces and traffic diversions. This new project - massively more significant than originally plannedfor - is going to cause prolonged problems for all stakeholders around the Hawthorns site.The impact on the children attending Bristol Grammar School will be huge. I am extremely worriedabout the safety of children between ages 5 and 18 attending BGS - they are crossing Elton Roadall day and as I understand it construction traffic will be funnelled down Elton Road. Surely thisdefies common sense?And then there is the environmental impact. Air quality is already poor in this area and heavyconstruction traffic is going to exacerbate this. I would be interested to hear how the Council isgoing to reconcile this with its legal obligations to clean up our air.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

These plans are problematic for the other surrounding residents that are not part of theuniversity community. Little attention had been paid to Elton Road access and for anyone who isnot using the university facilities. I access Elton Road at least twice a day and this change willcause considerable access issues. It will put more pressure on Queens Road access which isalready fairly in accessible and has overloaded parking. There has not been enough considerationfor the access that this area provides to the schools surrounding - how are parents meant toaccess this area? The plans have been made entirely with the university in mind and lacksconsideration for the wider community using this area - the university must consider that itscampus is not gated and it must provide access to its neighbours who also have access to theroads.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

This proposal will cause significant traffic disruption including major queues andtherefore pollution in a residential area. It will also impact on the area by making it feel like acampus, within which other members of the community may feel less welcome, including olderresidents and children at BGS

on 2020-03-02   SUPPORT

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

As a mother of a child at BGS, I have to express my deep concern and objection to thecurrent plans. The building is totally out of keeping with surrounding buildings both in character butmore importantly size. In a city with already high air pollution levels, everything must be done toprotect our children from additional and unnecessary air pollution both in terms of demolition andincreased traffic flow down the centre of the school (Elton road).

on 2020-03-02   SUPPORT

The library will be a monumental project and one that changes the landscape of thisarea. The building must represent a metaphorical figure head and this building does that. I like andappreciate the green spaces on the building being accommodated by the eccentric shape of theunits.

on 2020-03-02   SUPPORT

Just wanted to say I think this looks like a great new addition to Bristol both in terms ofit's look and more spaces promoting learning and culture (especially hopefully bridging better thegap between the university and the rest of the city).

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

This development is a result of the UoB's continued expansion, yet it is far from clearthat it will be sufficient to meet future needs. Wouldn't the University be better placed creating twolibraries, a smaller one on this site and another in Temple Quarter, utilising space within the newacademic building?

Overall, I think the mass and scale of the building are too great and far in excess of what would bereasonable for this site. It will have a significant detrimental impact on the low-rise neighbourhood.The council's SPD 11 for the UoB indicated acceptance of a larger building on this site but thisproposal is far in excess of that. The Historic England reports says it all: "We advise that by virtueof its massing and design, the proposed library would be harmful to the character and appearanceof the Conservation Area and setting of highly-graded heritage assets. The applicant has notdemonstrated why a scheme cannot be delivered which better aligns with the massing proposedby the SPD for the site."

There was a public consultation at the end of last year and I was told at the Beacon Housesession on the 15th October that all submitted written comments would be provided to the council.I note the "Report of Community Involvement" contains summaries of issues and responses butnot the actual comments. This conveniently avoids publishing negative feedback which isinevitable with any planning application. Although there may be some small changes to thescheme prior to submission, it appears to me to be largely the same. It is disappointing that thosemembers of the public that have already gone to the trouble of providing feedback at the pre-

application stage will not have their comments reviewed at the application stage. Where concernshave been summarised, the responses contain much spin, e.g. with regards to the height of thedevelopment (p42) the response states "The building comprises six stories above ground with astepping scale from the Elton Rd residential villas to the much larger institutional Senate House".No, the proposed library is taller than Senate House!

That response perpetuates the view in the consultation document stating that the library "providesa bridge between the scale of neighbouring Victorian villas and the form of Senate House". At37.5m tall it is over twice as high as the existing Hawthorns building and 8m higher than the bulkof neighbouring Senate House. It rises over 30m higher than the rooftops of the neighbouringvillas (school buildings) on Elton Road. A "bridge" would be a structure whose height is betweenthose of the surrounding villas and Senate House - this is more of a mountain. The providedvisualisations flatter to deceive. Street-level views from Elton Road, Woodland Road, theneighbouring school, etc. would more clearly demonstrate the impact this building will have, not tomention changing the skyline of Bristol for the worse, visible from the Downs to the harbourside.

The building will not only impact light to the Barton Buildings and the new classrooms, asacknowledged in their assessment, it will also cast a long shadow over the buildings along PrioryRoad, which are not included in the day/night survey, no doubt because they are owned by theUoB.

While offering largely unprecedented views of Bristol, it will also permit unobstructed views of mostof the open spaces on the neighbouring BGS site and loss of privacy. The BGS Junior schoolpaddock playground is already overlooked by Senate House, and this will obviously also bepossible from the new library, but its location now affords views over virtually all the open space inthe senior school. The school buildings lining Elton Road will also be overlooked, including theInfant school external spaces.

I also object to the University sequestering public highways to further their ambitions to create acampus in the heart of Bristol. Residents, schools and local businesses will all be negativelyaffected by the proposals which will increase traffic flow around the site. Reduction of overallparking spaces and the pedestrian area will negatively impact school children (from age 4upwards) and parents. Cars are a necessary evil for many families who are unable to walk toschool nor live near public transportation links, and this is especially true when supporting veryearly morning and after school events. The proposal caters specifically for the University's needswith little consideration beyond that. Despite the new pedestrian area, the proposal fails to addressother pedestrian concerns, most notably on the junction between Woodland Road and TyndallsPark Rd. This junction is very challenging to navigate as a pedestrian at peak times, forcingchildren, students, etc. to take unreasonable risks to cross it. That junction will become far morehazardous with the increased traffic flow as a result of the proposed changes. The junctionbetween Tyndalls Park Rd and St Michael's Hill will be modified, why was this one ignored? Thewhole public realm scheme should be reconsidered.

The demolition of the existing building and the lengthy construction process should also beconsidered. I saw no mention of how traffic would be managed during that process. The significantnoise produced will be of concern to parents with children at the neighbouring school, especiallyduring exam times. Finally, the amount of particulate matter released into the air over such a longperiod of time and its health consequences should be of general concern to all neighbours,especially the school. Hawthorns probably contains asbestos and the height of the developmentmeans no part of the surrounding neighbourhood will escape dust and debris from the multi-yearconstruction.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

I was at Bristol University 1966 -69 I've lived in Clifton ever since. This area is full of bigold buildings and trees. It is calm and peaceful and any development should meld into it. Theproposed building is brutal and makes no attempt to fit into its surroundings.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

The proposed building is too big and out of proportion compared with surroundingbuildings. Changes to traffic systems risk turning the area into a campus to the exclusion ofexisting residents.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

I strongly object to these plans. The design of the new building completely overshadowsthe historic architecture of those surrounding it. I am deeply concerned for the safety of thechildren attending BGS once all traffic is funnelled down Elton Road. Children attend this schoolfrom 4 years old and many have younger siblings who walk to and from the site with them. Trafficcongestion will be out of control and parking for residents and parents at the school will be almostnon existent.BGS has been on this site long before Bristol University and is becoming an island in the middle ofthe University Campus.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

The building itself does not fit with the existing architecture of the beautiful buildings inthe surrounding area. My main objective is safety related. The construction of the building bringsmany safety concerns for the large number of children at the nearby school. The heavyconstruction traffic and noise will be extremely disruptive for the learning and wellbeing of thechildren at Bristol grammar.I'm addition , the proposed pedestrianisation of the roads will make it very difficult to take theyounger children to school. The younger children must be dropped off at the school by parentsand this proposal gives no consideration to that. Many of the children travel from parts of Bristoland walking or public transportation is not an option. There is nowhere to park close by and dropchildren. This proposal will result in cars parking dangerously to allow parents to drop children atschool.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

I am a parent at BGS infant school.I like the design of the library but have concerns about it's massive size overpowering thecharacter of the listed buildings nearby.I also have concerns about increased traffic down Elton road and the danger this could pose to thechildren.Pedestrianising Elton road would be good in my opinion.Good luck.

on 2020-03-02   OBJECT

I'm not opposed to this site being developed but I question the size of the building andthe reasons given. Which part of the community will use the library alongside the students, whatresearch has been done on this? There are a number of good public libraries close to this site. Ifstudents wanted a campus university they would have chosen to attend one. Many are attracted toBristol due to its central location and the benefits of being right in the middle of the city. Theuniversity is keen to provide a campus feel university in the centre of a busy city is simply notpractical. The proposed pedestrian area which will be done as part of this development will impactthe immediate and wider community hugely. No account of children's safety had been taken intoaccount. There is a school that has over 1,000 pupils some as young as 4 which is right in themiddle of the University 'campus'. With the proposed pedestrian area more traffic will now beforced down Elton road which splits the school site. This road is already poorly used bycommuters and buses who often mount the pavements when children are walking to and fromlessons. This is not about losing parking spaces this is about safety of children and traffic flowaround the area.

on 2020-03-01   SUPPORT

This is a brilliant, forward-thinking, exciting and long overdue proposal. A new librarywould be a vital and welcome asset to the city of Bristol and to its esteemed hundred-year-olduniversity. I write to fully support the application, as a resident of the city, and as a user of itslibraries, museums and galleries. Also I should mention that I work in Special Collections in theArts and Social Sciences Library, so I have an understanding of the drawbacks of currentarrangements and also of the potential for improvement.The new library, with its exhibition halls, a cafe and public meeting/lecture rooms, would be a jewelin the crown of the city. It would be a wonderful social space and mixing place for students,residents and visitors to the city. The treasures of Special Collections and of the TheatreCollection could be properly cared for, researched, and exhibited, along with visiting exhibitions.Not to overlook the main function of a library: housing the books and providing the study spacesthat students need.There is currently a dearth of good exhibition space in the city. The Arts and Social SciencesLibrary is clearly inadequate as the university's flagship library. Hawthorns is something of tired,mish-mash blob of joined up villas. Nevertheless parts of Hawthorns should be saved, such as theglorious blue art nouveau fireplace.Not everyone likes modern architecture. However, the old and the new can complement eachother, and enhance an area with variety and interest - see any UK town high street. No doubtpeople in the 1920s complained about the presence and mass of the huge (now considered to beiconic) Wills Memorial Building!If the plan is approved, the city council should grasp the opportunity to seriously address the many

issues relating to traffic, parking, cycle routes, signage, rat runs and road layout etc in the widerarea around the new library. There are definitely problems to be resolved relating to the safety ofpedestrians and cyclists. All this in the context of the climate crisis and ongoing ecocide. Theseare real emergencies now and cannot be ignored. In the coming years we can expect the adventof driverless, perhaps community-owned, vehicles purring around the city, along with the declineof so many generally unused (parked up) individually owned cars. Petrol heads should thinkbeyond their selfish desires to a right to drive wherever and whenever they want to, despite the airpollution caused by their vehicles and their tyres actually slowly killing us all.On that cheery note, I look forward to the University dynamically enhancing its civic andinternational role, and adding to the local cultural scene, while improving the student experienceand educational outcomes. Bristol should continue to a leader in bold and innovative futures anddevelopments. Bring on the new library!

on 2020-03-01   OBJECT

I firmly object to this development on three counts . Firstly, this is a residential area nota university campus ! The take over of this area by the university and its aspiration to increasenumbers and redesignate this area as a student campus shows a total disrespect for the history ofthe area , the architecture, and the balance of people who inhabit the area . This development hasnothing to do with enhancing education through the building of a new library. It is the marketisationof university education and profit at the expense of the lived reality of people who chose to live inthe residential streets surrounding this development . This area is NOT a university campus . Thiscity is recognised for its influence and impact on the arts, media and culture. It is not at the behestof this arrogant university to redefine the city around its aspiration to be all campus university. Thismonstrous design in a residential area is evidence of the complete lack of community spirit andresponsibility extended in so many ways by this heavy handed , autocratic institution. Their actionsare totally focused on profit and through advancing student numbers way beyond the infrastructure of the city. None of this advancement brings any income to council tax or the greatergood of people who live here . The only people to benefit are landlords and the university.Secondly, while an advocate of modern architecture this design is not in any way in keeping withthe surrounding environment . Its domineering brutalist design is not in keeping with immediatesurroundings . While it might serve the needs of the university and the people who work in it, theidea that people will have too accommodate seeing this from their homes is unreasonable .Perhaps the Vice Chancellor would like to have this on his doorstep! If it's not something he wouldtolerate why should residents in this area have to suffer .Thirdly, this is a residential area with some of the most wonderful examples of the noble

architecture of the past and a sensitive layout of roads for pedestrians to enjoy walking aroundtheir area . I object to the university redefining this area around its vision for a future whichcompletely destroys the historic and social history of the area . This is not an area for a universitycampus which incorporates an ugly high rise library and a brings changes to the layout of roads,transport and usage for the benefit of students at the expense of people who live here , paycouncil tax and work to keep this city a pleasant and inviting place - a city on a human scale. Thisproposed building is not on a human scale . It is functionalism and modernism at its worst plannedto be dumped in a residential area.

on 2020-03-01  

The Theatre Collection is a globally recognised museum and archive of British theatrehistory; a storehouse of incredible historical artifacts, which reflect a multiplicity of lives andstories. It forms part of the University of Bristol but its staff work to ensure that the Collection isavailable to anyone who wants to research, enjoy and explore it. Currently this highly respectedCollection is in a building with unwelcoming frontage and cramped facilities, indeed manymembers of the public have commented on how they never knew about the Collection or where itwas, or that they had passed the building and didn't realise that they were allowed to go in. Thenew library building will enable a purpose-built site that will showcase cultural collections; thatinstead of seeming like a 'hidden gem' will in fact be highly visible and welcoming for all. TheCollection currently opens its doors to external students from local colleges and schools for studyvisits and workshops, as well as interested members of the local community; from special interestgroups to individual family historians. The new library in its new and beautiful building will be ableto continue and increase its engagement with the city and regional communities and individuals. Alarger, more welcoming space will enable new audiences, events and exhibitions; both continuedand increased opportunities for a range of users who may currently neither know about thecollections nor feel able to approach. The buildings itself is being created by internationallyrecognised architects who have designed some of the most beautiful libraries in the world. Thenew university library at Bristol will be something that not just the university can feel proud of butwhich the entire city can feel proud of and - more importantly - actively engage with.

on 2020-03-01   SUPPORT

I fully support this planning application for a new library and exhibition space.As a volunteer and temporary staff at the Theatre collection, I look forward to the opportunitieswith the new building and serving the collection better with the proposed move. The exhibitionspace will allow more items of the collection to be visible by students and the public, and the newproposed work areas will allow the collection, under its recently achieved designated status, togrow in importance as a designated collection for national and international research.As a graduate from the University of Bristol, I consider that the provision of a civic space in theheart of the area underlines the close ties that the University of Bristol has with the city. Theproposed site is not just for the benefit of students and academics but also for the localcommunity. The provision of more meeting areas, exhibition spaces, and pedestrianisation of aroad that was becoming a rat run, demonstrates the aim of the University to continue itsrelationship with the city.The modernity of the building is one that demonstrates how architecture can contribute to theenvironment offering space and light as well as important concerns of efficient energy use. Thecurrent building at the Hawthorns with stairs and different internal levels presents some issues foraccess. Its windows are single glazed metal frames offering poor heat retention. The existinglibrary also has some heating issues, with the windows and storage heaters inefficient at heatretention. With modern materials, designs and construction methods the proposed plans offer theUniversity and the City of Bristol a building fit for use for the future.

on 2020-03-01   OBJECT

Whilst I approve of the building of a library on the site it is the design I object to. It isharsh, unsympathetic to the surrounding buildings/ environment and depressingly oppressive. Itsends out the message to the local community 'keep out this doesn't concern you'. The Universityhas taken over so much of the area the least they can do is provide an aesthetically pleasinglandmark. Architecture that is exciting and thought provoking would enhance the area whereasthis feels dated and bland. Please rethink the architectural design.

on 2020-03-01   OBJECT

To whoever designed this dreadful plan amongst some of the most beautiful buildings inthe city, I think should seriously ask themselves if they are preserving or destroying Bristol'sheritage. A repeat of the monstrosity of the town centre.

I strongly object.

on 2020-02-29   OBJECT

I have studied and worked at the University of Bristol. It is, therefore, disappointing tohave to object to this proposal. However, this application is entirely inappropriate for itssurroundings and appears to have been made against recommendations at the pre-planningstage. This suggests arrogance and an unwillingness to listen to, and learn from, concerns alreadyraised.A strength of the University of Bristol has been that it is not a campus university, and its studentsand staff are accommodated in buildings that form part of the wider cityscape. The proposedlibrary building is too tall in the context of the conservation area. It will overshadow the surroundingdevelopment, and the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School.I note, and agree with, comments from Historic England that: "by virtue of its massing and design,the proposed library would be harmful to the character and appearance of the Conservation Areaand setting of highly-graded heritage assets. The applicant has not demonstrated why a schemecannot be delivered which better aligns with the massing proposed by the SPD for the site."The building will also have a detrimental impact on the skyline and views of this area of Bristolfrom further away.It seems the University has chosen to ignore some of the concerns that have already been raisedand are determined to try to push through this unwelcome, domineering proposal. I do hope BristolCity Council planning officers will insist on something more sensitive to, and in keeping with, thelocal environment.

on 2020-02-28   OBJECT

For many years I was Secretary of the Council of the Preservation of Ancient Bristol, saton the Council of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaelogical Society of which I am a pastPresident, and the Bristol Cathedral Fabric Advisory Committee.This building's exterior is utterly inappropriate for its context, and detracts from the adjoiningbuildings in Woodland Road, the Grammar School and the old Baptist College. It is moreappropriate to 1970s Roumania or eastern Europe. It will age very quickly and appear even moreinapropiate in 10 years time. I was actively associated with the University for 45 years, for some ofwhich I worked in the existing library as historic collections officer. The design is brutalist,depressing and unworthy of the city scape and it's context.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I think opening libraries is always cause for celebration (a good change from them beingclosed in recent years, although I do appreciate this is not a public library). I like the idea of thepublic spaces such as the cafe inside, as long as prices are not ridiculous.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

The proposed new library will make the university more open to public and increase theengagement between city and university. The proposed building is impressive and matches theambition fo the neighbouring architecture without trying to copy it or create a mock-gothic or mock-victoriana.

Proposed traffic calming measures are welcome!

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I think that the new University Library and the accompanying public realm will offer anexciting addition to the area. Any form of pedestrianisation is in line with Bristol's climate changeagenda and the introduction of this civic square with proposed biodiversity of planting has topromote well-being for all users.The opening of the new Centre for Cultural Collections will provide a great opportunity to accessexhibitions and to see items from the university archives easily. I can imagine that pupils from theGrammar School will enjoy spending time after school in the café and exploring the exhibitions aswell as joining the many others who will be able to relax in the new outdoor spaces.The building will also help to address the shortfall that the University currently has in terms ofstudy seats for their students. A high quality design such as this will improve the studentexperience and promote the University's reputation both at home and on the international stage.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I'm commenting in my capacity as a member of University of Bristol library staff. Thisdevelopment will provide valuable space not only for University students and staff but will alsoallow the Universities rich collections to be opened up to greater public use. More green spaces,pedestrianised spaces, and safer cycle lanes will help improve accessibility and inclusion andmake the area safer and more pleasant for all.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I fully support this proposal. A new University Library would be a very significant assetto the city of Bristol, the local community, and of course the thousands of students at theUniversity. This would be a major civic resource and another important indication that Bristol is aforward-looking city with great ambition.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I work in London's West End as a Stage Door Keeper, and am also the Archivist at theHarold Pinter Theatre. Without the assistance of the Bristol Theatre Archive and my visits to them,I could not have completed the archive in this theatre, or at the Playhouse Theatre in London.They are a vital source of information to my Profession, and any new building or facilities thatincreases access for individuals such as myself, and will give future generations access, is mostwelcome. As a Profession we have a rich history, and it must be preserved and viewed.A.H.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

I fully support this proposal and consider it an excellent addition to the city of Bristol.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

As a user of Bristol's libraries, museums and galleries (as well as a librarian in theuniversity with over thirty years of service) I wish to support the proposed new university library.It is more than twenty years since there was a dedicated exhibition space available in theUniversity Library in which to welcome visitors to share the riches of its printed and manuscriptholdings. The Library frequently lends materials to outside venues, in the UK and beyond and yetis unable to exhibit here in Bristol. The new building will provide several exhibition areas, as wellas group study and reading rooms for very close engagement with these resources. High-qualityfacilities will enable the university to host treasures on loan from other institutions.The new library will be a focus for a programme of cultural activity and a significant addition toBristol's capacity in this regard. It will greatly increase awareness of opportunities for lifelonglearning and provide the infrastructure necessary for increasing use.I believe that such developments are very long overdue and will be an essential part of sustainingthe University's national and international reputation in the field of education and enhancing thequality of life in Bristol.

on 2020-02-28  

I sympathise with the University's wish to have expanded and improved library facilities;indeed, the massive increase in student numbers since the existing library was built would seem tomake this mandatory.

However, I am concerned about the amount of glazing proposed for the projected new library, andwonder whether the lessons of Dominique Perrault's design for the French National Library(https://www.pps.org/places/french-national-library) have been fully absorbed. These misgivingswere not alleviated by the fact that when I talked to a representative of the architects and arepresentative of the clients at one of the drop-in meetings arranged by the University, neitherseemed aware of the problems that had arisen in Paris.

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

What is not to love about building a new library?!A very exciting development and sympathetic to the surrounding area: the historic buildings andalso new buildings such as the theatre extension on Bristol Grammar School, and the new ColstonHall down the road.The proposals for the new civic space look fantastic too - with Bristol leading the way on makingmore spaces for people and not cars! In the context of climate emergency it is brilliant to see UoBproposing changes to the public realm which will make it easier for people to get around,improving accessibility, and with more access to benches, toilets etc. Fully support these plans.

on 2020-02-28   OBJECT

I do not object to the University's desire to replace the Hawthorns and to enhance thepublic realm. I particularly appreciate the desire to open access to the University's culturalcollections more widely.However, I object to these plans in their current form.

1. The proposed Library building design seems to be driven by a desire for a "landmark" building.It is too big in mass and scale for its situation in a conservation area and near listed buildings (seeEnglish Heritage advice) as well as in an area characterised by Victorian housing. It needs to beshorter and configured to be sympathetic and not overwhelming to its surrounds.

2. In addition to the immediate local impact on the surrounding area, a building of this scale willhave a detrimental impact on the skyline and character of this area of Bristol from further away. Itshould not compete with the Wills Building, which is an iconic University structure.

3. I also object to the current plans for the public realm. I am all for enhancing what is available tothe public and to pedestrians. However, The University has called this area "Campus Heart", butBristol University is not a campus university, and it seems to me there are going to be inevitableclashes if it tries to create a "campus" in the middle of an existing city. The current plans prioritisestudents and the university even in public spaces such as roads. I live in Bishopston, and passthrough this area to access the Whiteladies Rd, Triangle, Hotwells etc areas, and this is already achallenge due to pressure of traffic and changes in road layout that limit routes open to cars and

buses. I object to all of the one-way or road closure proposals that are part of these plans, since itwill a) make it even more difficult and time-consuming to traverse this area for cars and buses, b) itwill simply displace traffic to surrounding roads and create a worse environment there, c) attractivethough a pedestrian space would be, the University is not a campus university and this is not theplace for it, because the detrimental impact on other community members is too great (especiallyas that impact would be year-round, but the great majority of University students are in Bristol onlyfor part of the year.)

on 2020-02-28   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

The current site at the corner of Woodland road where the current buildings stand areno more than a glorified carpark and combination of buildings that have been constructed overmany years and are an eyesore.

The development of this area is much needed and the proposal for a new state of the art library ismuch need by the University and will add a elegant and fresh feel to the area.

The plans drawn up are by world leaders in library architecture are exciting and will give a modern,imaginative space which will be a true asset to students, residents and Bristol showing we areleaders in creating high quality projects.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

After viewing the scale model of the new library at Howard House I think this will bring afresh look to the very old and dilapidated building

This will provide a modern area where the students of UOB will enjoy going to research importantinformation.

The existing library is a very dated building and so the new building with all its new features will bemore sustainable and better for the environment.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

The relationship between the City and County of Bristol, and the University of Bristol, ismutually beneficial with the influx of students, staff and support services generating income andgrowth for the city, and the city providing essential infrastructure and local services for universitymembers.

Speaking both as a University employee, a University graduate, and a Bristol resident of 20 years,I recognise the essential necessity of providing future generations of students with sufficient spaceand working environment in which to study. The University must be able to offer its students andresearchers a 21st-century library that is both a working environment that is fit for purpose, and abuilding of scale and significance within the cityscape.

The proposed building offers the chance to provide that. It's design attempts to both harmonise (intone and texture) with its neighbouring buildings in the university campus, and also to stand outboldly as a statement building, while still being achieve its primary objective: study spaces forstudents and staff.

It is a modern building, and can be fairly seen as out of sync with the architecture of Woodlandand Elton Roads - but in its time, the Gothic architecture of the Wills Memorial Building would havestood out from the Classical buildings on Park Street and Queen's Road, and the present BrutalistArts & Social Sciences Library with the Victorian villas of Redland and High Kingsdown.

My own personal architectural preferences aside, I can see that this proposed new UniversityLibrary achieves it's foremost objective: meeting the demand for adequate (and more thanadequate) working space for new generations of students and staff. The accompanyingpedestrianisation areas and promotion of a central university campus area will haveaccompanying benefits in terms of health, safety and wellbeing.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

This does sound like a genuinely exciting plan. To think that the general public couldhave access to the phenomenal resources held by and accessible to the University of Bristolwould be a game-changer for Bristol. The archives that have previously been exclusive toUniversity Students and Academics would truly harness inclusivity at every level. Good plan!

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

This does sound like a genuinely exciting plan. To think that the general public couldhave access to the phenomenal resources held by and accessible to the University of Bristolwould be a game-changer for Bristol. The archives that have previously been exclusive toUniversity Students and Academics would truly harness inclusivity at every level. Good plan!

I am a keen admirer of Victorian architecture and antiquity however, I also understand that thedemand and growth of Higher Education as a whole present challenges that demand change,utilising the space occupied by the Hawthorns would be a worthy sacrifice that would addcharacter to the landscape and allow conservation groups to appreciate the beauty of antiquitypaired with modernity. I do believe that this would work by contrasts.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

This does sound like a genuinely exciting plan. To think that the general public couldhave access to the phenomenal resources held by and accessible to the University of Bristolwould be a game-changer for Bristol. The archives that have previously been exclusive toUniversity Students and Academics would truly harness inclusivity at every level. Good plan!

I am a keen admirer of Victorian architecture and antiquity however, I also understand that thedemand and growth of Higher Education as a whole present challenges that demand change,utilising the space occupied by the Hawthorns would be a worthy sacrifice that would addcharacter to the landscape and allow conservation groups to appreciate the beauty of antiquitypaired with modernity. I do believe that this would work by contrasts.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

Love the fact that this will allow people from all over Bristol to access some of theUniversity's treasures!

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

I am commenting in my capacity as Assistant Director, Library Services at the Universityof Bristol. The New University Library building is a much needed investment both for providing aplace for students to study and learn but it also offers a unique opportunity to incorporate a Centrefor Cultural Collections that will be accessible by residents of the city and beyond. The Centre willbring together two nationally important collections - the University's Special Collections and therecently designated Theatre Collection. The Centre will offer specialist facilities and services tostudents, academics and the wider public, including exhibition galleries to explore and interact withthe collections and research. In addition to the Centre the ground floor will also contain a café,Creative Lab and Events Space which will be used for publicly accessible talks, readings andother events all of which will help to open up the University to Bristol residents and visitors to thecity. I fully support this application.

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

I should declare from the outset that I work in the Special Collections Department of theUniversity of Bristol Library, so am biased towards wanting a new University Library.

The improved services for Special Collections will allow the materials we hold, which are ofnational and international interest to be conserved, stored, and consulted in the best way, whichwill make them accessible to all for people now and in the future.

The building will be accessible to all on the ground floor, and will have an exhibition space, whichwill give all the opportunity to see some of the treasures held within the Library. This may bematerials from Special Collections or the Theatre Collection, or the other holdings in the library.

It will be a boost to the people and visitors of Bristol, as there will be a new art space to visit.Hopefully it will also encourage people, who have traditionally not engaged with the University tohave an opportunity to do so.

The building is modern in design, which some people may not like, but I think it will complementthe tall University towers around (Wills Memorial Building, Senate House, HH Wills PhysicsBuilding), and will carry on the vision of people like Sir George Oatley (who designed the WMBand Physics) to build towers which can be seen from afar.

I look forward to working in a new building, and hope that others will appreciate a new building,

which they can be part of.

I am also pleased with the work that is being carried out to factor in environmental concerns,relating to the building, and storage of unique materials.

on 2020-02-27   OBJECT

moment by the closure of St Michael's Park, with back log of traffic on Tyndall Avenue. Bristol bustles 7 days a week, 52 weeks of the year. University students attend for 7 or 8 months of the year. Is the university seriously considering blocking off roads permanently to suit students who are present for just part of each year?

on 2020-02-27   SUPPORT

This is an amazing Project! Making the neighbourhood more vibrant and continuing theprinciple of community building

on 2020-02-27   OBJECT

I do not have a strong opinion about most of the plan; however, I would like to object tothe suggestion on p40 that the planned cycleway ought to look like that shown in figure 14 (a).

I regularly use the cycleway shown in that figure as part of my commute to work, and for generaltransport. I do not think that the very subtle change in appearance is a good way to demarcate thepresence of a cycleway and to distinguish it from the footway. The ambiguity this creates regularlyleads to people walking in the cycleway, because they are unaware that it's not the footway.

I think this effect is especially pronounced now that lots of people walk along paying onlyperipheral attention, because they're looking at a mobile phone. In this circumstance, only bigvisual cues work, because peripheral vision does not have much acuity.

Please follow the best practices from countries who know how it's done, like Netherlands, andcolour the bike lane in red.

If the bike lane were coloured in red, I would support this plan. I wish BCC (and Sustrans andothers!) would regularly apply some common sense and look to our expert continental friends forthis stuff.

on 2020-02-27   OBJECT

Speaking as a graduate of the University of Bristol, a former member of University Courtand someone who loves the City of Bristol although am currently living abroad, I cannot supportwhat amounts to another act of vandalism by the University on the historic fabric of the WoodlandRoad site, by demolishing such an iconic building as the Hawthorns Hotel, especially for those ofus who studied in the 1980s. It is quite simply wrong. And to replace it with what amounts to yetanother University carbuncle, out of scale and out of keeping with its surroundings, is simply yetanother act of vandalism (of many) by the University on one of the more beautiful parts of the city.The whole plan of course is sugared with pseudo-environmentalism and so-called 'public access'to buy support but the reality is that the whole scheme makes travelling in an already crowded cityeven more difficult by interfering unnecessarily with the traffic and the building itself will no doubtbe out of date and style even quicker than the old University library was. Not to mention I am sureas usual they will knock it up on the cheap and then have to refurbish it pronto but that is merespeculation. Please don't let the University continue to destroy historic buildings outside the limitsof the Royal Fort campus. Future generations will thank you.

on 2020-02-26   SUPPORT

I would like to offer my wholehearted support for the new library and the refreshing ofthe tired Hawthorns complex, which in my opinion is a dilapidated eye sore. The plans showcasean offering from the University that elegantly incorporates essential library services and space forthe public to be involved and enjoy.

The design seems perfect to me as it echoes the neighbouring architecture while being a modernbreath of fresh air. This type of architecture has been welcomed across Bristol with the annexe toSt Georges and the theatre of the Bristol Grammar School just down the road from the library site.

The University has a track record of creating imaginative spaces to a very high standard whichprovides much confidence in this build.

This new library will be a true asset to the city and I look forward to it being used to its full potentialby residents and students alike. This is an exciting opportunity to build something brilliant.

on 2020-02-26   OBJECT

landscape should celebrate the fact that the university is intertwined with the city as a whole.

The Group feels the same argument applies St Michael's Park, which should also remain two-way. The current proposal to split the road so that one half is one-way while the other half two-way is confusing and, given the proposal not to separate the cycle route in the one-way section, potentially quite dangerous.

To turn to the library, the size of the proposed building demonstrably exceeds that determined by SPD11. The Group regrets it is unable to support the height, scale and mass of the current proposal. It would be against the grain of the conservation area and of the immediate context. It would overwhelm the nearby buildings of Bristol Grammar School, the former Baptist College and the Victorian villas of Woodland Road and Elton Road.

In addition to the sheer size of the proposed library, its demanding architectural character would be discordant with the wider cityscape and, when seen from more distant viewpoints, the design would exacerbate the building's immense scale. The unsettled, cubic forms of the proposed building would cause it to appear ill at ease both with its location and with itself.

The Group recognises the University's ambition to continue to expand but feels what has been asked of the Hawthorns site should be reconsidered. The brief has asked too much of a finite location

on 2020-02-26   SUPPORT

I wish we had something like this in Salisbury as it provides tacit evidence of a thrivingCity and creates a vibrancy in an area that desperately needs it.

i never fail to be amazed at the dynamism that exists within Bristol and its capacity to embracenew buildings and create new spaces that will be of benefit to generations to come.

This is a clear indication that Bristol is being led by a visionary Council that cares about its peopleand it legacy.

on 2020-02-26   SUPPORT

As a student at the University this proposal represents an extremely exciting change forthe Unviersity to build a world-class library to provide a high standard of education to its students.

Current facilities are not fit for purpose, with lack of study spaces and an outdated building hostingthe library's main collections (Arts and Social Sciences Library on Tyndall Avenue). Studentsfrequently complain about these issues. Additionally, incredible University collections such as theTheatre Collection are currently being housed in facilities that do no justice to these items thatmake up one of the world's largest archives of British Theatre History. The proposed publicengagement facilities will open these and the University up to far more of the city and continueBristol's civic engagement.

The design and thought in the architecture is excellent, with lots of thought given to thesurroundings and lighting. The stone selected will match the surrounding building and will providea landmark for both the University and the city skyline. The pedestrianisation of the area willimprove student safety, encourage better flow in the area and provide a new square in the city forevents.

The current Hawthorn's Building is an eyesore and is not fit for purpose. It's time for a new, moreexciting and archetecturally stunning building to take its place and help cement Bristol as a world-leading University and world-leading city. I am certain that the majority of the student body wouldagree with this.

I fully support this proposal.

on 2020-02-26   SUPPORT

I love the proposal for the new library and the refreshing of the drab Hawthorns complexthat is long overdue. The plan is modern, aspirational, elegant and visually exciting. It offers theutility of essential library services with a dynamic sense of space and place for everyone to enjoy.The design is sensitive to the neighbouring architecture while being modern and directional. It isan essential, vital addition to Bristol; a city that I am sure wishes to present itself as a modern,dynamic, future facing, confident European city. This project will help to convey these qualities toBristolians, the rest of the country, Europe and beyond!

on 2020-02-26   SUPPORT

I fully support the University's application to build a new University library on the existingHawthorns site. Not only will this provide a world class resource for University students and staff,the prospect of opening up nationally important collections and artefacts to the public throughbespoke exhibition spaces will create new connections between the University and the city. I alsofully support the modern building design, which will enhance the local area and create a newBristol landmark building.

on 2020-02-25   OBJECT

This is the second time the University of Bristol (UoB) has submitted plans for theirproposed new library on Woodland Road. It is in conjunction with their plans to create a 'PublicRealm' between this new library and the Senate House by closing Woodland Road at the junctionwith Perry Road and Tyndall Avenue causing huge disruption to the road network in thiscommunity to serve only their own ever increasing building programme in this area and surmountsto no more than a land grab of public owned roads and pavements. It is a vanity project which hasno give back to the local community apart from offering us yet another coffee bar in an area whichis already adorned with them.

This is also at a time when the UoB is in considerable mounting debt yet still wishing to extend itsfootprint throughout the city with ever growing student numbers. It is a business risk to promoteitself to students of the future and does not consider the inappropriateness of this ugly designplonked into our neighbourhood environment.

UoB's initial plans for the new library were rejected in a previous submission and it is now back onthe table with very little meaningful difference. It's still too large a building at road level incomparison to neighbouring buildings - and against the skyline - and completely out of place in aConservation Area.

My family have lived on St Michael's Hill very close to the current UoB library since 1992 and arewell used to the UoB pushing for an 'iconic building' to profile the UoB to the city. It's not a campus

University which they are clearly trying to create, it is an institution which is part of the fabric of theliving and breathing city conurbation shared with a public and a neighbourhood it has shown scantregard for during the many years of their continuously rolling building development programmeand the disruption it causes not to mention the downside to the quality of life this creates.

The local community is not given a voice in the UoB's deliberations and when we try, as in thepublic 'consultation' meeting organised by UoB at Beacon House on 01/10/19 we are dismissedquite openly as irksome naysayers whose opinions are smirked at by patronising UoB officials ortheir consultant professionals. Local residents seem to matter little in the UoB's progress forward.

Our house on St Michael's Hill has a vista to the rear with a wide panoramic view which includesthe Clifton Suspension Bridge and Ashton Park beyond. It's one of the reasons which drew us tobuy the house. This new proposed library building is of the size which will considerably obfuscatethis view with its clumsy square design nearly three times the height of the existing buildings onthe same footprint. This is not about creating a new library space it is about creating a self-aggrandising obelisk in a part of the city which is totally unsuited to such a large edifice.

There are undoubtedly better options for a new library to consider without the need for suchgrandiose plans. Why don't UoB include the local community in the initial thinking for this? My realworry is that the two plans are so conjoined that should this new library building be given the greenlight that the closure of Woodland Road and the creation of the flawed 'Public Realm' willautomatically receive a similar green light.

You have to live in the immediate community to understand that this is a wholly inappropriate anddisruptive planning application for both the new library and the proposed 'Public Realm'.

I totally object to this project.

on 2020-02-25   OBJECT

There are two parts of this application, and I object to both parts. The proposed newlibrary is a monstrously, huge block of a building which is out of context to its surroundingarchitecture in scale and form. It is far too dominating and uncomfortable in shape.The proposed alteration of the traffic on Tyndall Avenue and St Michael's Park does not benefitanyone who lives in Kingsdown and is highly obstructive to the flow of traffic across this part of thecity. It will only increase traffic congestion and parking difficulties elsewhere. I also see this asfurther encroachment of the University onto public space. These streets are the City's not part ofthe University's wished for 'precinct'.

on 2020-02-25   SUPPORT

I am writing in support of this planning application in my professional role as Director ofCultural Collections / Director: Theatre Collection and in my personal capacity as a Bristolresident.This is a landmark building which has been designed by internationally recognised architects torespond well to the local built environment and create a new public realm (both internally andexternally) that will be accessible, inclusive and welcoming. The civic square, and the public artwithin it, will encourage a wide range of people (local residents, visitors, those working nearby aswell as students and staff etc) to explore and feel a part of these spaces and the adjacent areas(including Royal Fort Gardens).Internally, the new university library building will transform the ways in which people, of all ages,can explore, learn from and be inspired by the University's Cultural Collections, which includeSpecial Collections and the Theatre Collection (a Designated collection and accredited museumand archive). The Centre for Cultural Collections, deliberately located on the publicly accessibleground floor, will provide numerous opportunities for the public to freely engage with thecollections through exhibition galleries, reading & viewing rooms, volunteering and an activeevents programme.Both collections are nationally -and sometimes internationally- important and both, also, holdarchival material which has a direct relationship with the history of the city as well as its creativeindustries (eg Wildfilm archive, Bristol Old Vic archive etc). In summary, the design of this newbuilding will allow the university to share its cultural collections with the city, and region, in waysthat would not otherwise be possible. I therefore fully support this application.

on 2020-02-25   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-25   OBJECT

The top of the building would be higher than the top of the Wills Memorial Building, itwould block and spoil both near and long views over the City. Viewed from the top of WhiteladiesRoad the building would block the iconic view of the countryside.

The Panel refuted the impact assessments, rather than the neutral or slight harms claimed, theharms to the nearby heritage assets would be severe and significant.

The proposals are not in accordance with Supplementary Planning Document 11 - the Universityof Bristol Strategic Masterplan. This stated that it was important for the new development torespect the building lines of existing developments on Elton Road and Woodland Road. It alsostated that the site could accommodate a development of between 3 and 7 storeys to allowbuilding heights to step up to reach the height of Senate House.

The proposals are also not in accordance with the Enhancement Statements of the relevantConservation Areas. The Whiteladies Road Conservation Area Enhancement Statement statesthat the character of the area relies on the subtle combination of mainly domestic qualities: solidlybuilt, substantial villas and terraces in local Brandon Hill and Bath stone... The Tyndall's ParkConservation Area Enhancement Statement states that Woodland Road is a pleasing mixture ofgrandly massed Edwardian buildings, mature landscaping and modest late terraced houses. Italso states that views of the escarpment from the city centre are now dominated by the bulk anduncompromising form of the [University] later buildings, reducing the impact of this end of the

Kingsdown escarpment.

The University is constructing substantial provision for students at Temple Meads and some of theaccommodation in the proposed building could be located there which is more suitable for tallbuildings. This would allow for the size of the library to be reduced.

on 2020-02-25   SUPPORT

I work at the university and live in the area. The new library will bring the area and theuniversity into the 21st century in a way that is both architecturally sympathetic to the heritage ofthe place and the institution, and a reflection of the need to provide an improved learningenvironment that genuinely connects the university to its neighbours.

on 2020-02-25   SUPPORT

As a local resident and senior member of University Library staff I strongly support theproposed development of the New University Library. I believe that the totality of the proposalsaround the building and its intended purpose, public realm, and associated highways works willsubstantially improve the amenities of the neighbourhood and foster greater engagement betweenthe University of Bristol and local communities.

Significant consultation has been undertaken with stakeholders within the University and localcommunities, and the current plans reflect shared ambitions for a completely new cultural hub forthe City. It will be open to all, accessible and inclusive, and offer a diverse range of cultural andlibrary collections and programmes of events, exhibitions, and activities which will enrich the livesof local as well as University communities, and provide unparalleled opportunities to connect to aworld-class knowledge environment.

The building itself will achieve the highest environmental and sustainability goals, and the designresponds to heritage and conservation requirements with a bold and well-poised moderncomplement and landmark addition to its surroundings. The enhancements to the public realm andhighways will improve day-to-day enjoyment and participation in the space, and improve roadsafety and air quality for everyone who spends a significant amount of their lives living, studying,and working in the area.

on 2020-02-25   OBJECT

This proposal is completely inappropriate due to its size and design.It is simply far too large for the site, totally disrespecting the existing mainly Victorian villas in thislocation.

The very contrived, quirky, design could have been deliberately created to shock and dominatethis Conservation Area.

A smaller, restrained design, using the dark local stone for the podium of a building could beacceptable.

on 2020-02-25   OBJECT

on 2020-02-24   SUPPORT

I'm writing in support of this planning application. The Cultural Collections, exhibitiongalleries and events space, and public engagement programmes, open to all, will provide richbenefit for our city and region. The external spaces surrounding the new library will providegreenery and landscaping of the neighbourhood, and will calm traffic and improve the safety of ouruniversity community, visitors and neighbours.

on 2020-02-24   SUPPORT

This would be an excellent development both for the University and for the city.

on 2020-02-24   OBJECT

The Hawthorns demolition and the proposed replacement with an overlarge,modernistic library building that is not in keeping with, nor sympathetic to its surroundingarchitecture is yet another example of The University of Bristol's lack of consideration for the Cityof Bristol and its local area. The proposed design is far too tall and will dominate and block theview from my house at the top of St Michael's Hill across to the South West of the city and AshtonPark. The recent 'collection' of University buildings has been overlarge, architecturally brutal andcertainly in the running for the 'carbuncle cup' (A British award for the ugliest building of whichBristol has quite a few).

The current Hawthorns whilst needing some TLC is in keeping with the other properties onWoodland Rd, (except The Senate) and if a new library is a burning necessity for the University,then please consider a more agreeable design which does not over dominate its surroundings. Itspredecessor with its soviet style brutalist design takes some beating but it looks like they'vemanaged it. Bring things back to a more humanly acceptable scale.As for the 'public realm', this is not and never will be or feel like a 'public space', it's a vanity projectand a land grab to boost the University's profile, their website and consequently their studentintake.I also fear that should this monstrosity be approved, then as with previous buildings it will suddenlybe even taller and larger than first envisaged.

I live yards from St Michael's Park and when I read that those who do not live around this area

describe this proposal as an improvement to the amenity and the community and how the area willbe much calmer, especially traffic, then I realise they do not regularly see it and certainly don't liveamongst it. Traffic will be far more pressured through the proposed routes especially St Michael'sPark. The junction with St Michael's Hill is tight enough currently and the footfall at this point of thehill ranges from continually busy to extremely intense. Apply tighter strictures on an already hecticarea and something will give, and it won't be of the pleasant kind. We are situated on a road thatserves the main hospital, the maternity hospital and oncology centre and the University wants toplay around with public realms? Better that it aided local residents in proper traffic calmingpropositions like negotiated spaces and really encouraged staff, students and visitors not to bringvehicles into the city centre.I object to this entire proposal because there are better designs, better community focusedprojects and better ways to achieve traffic calming in this area than closing a portion of a road andbuilding a disproportionately sized building close to a Conservation Area.

on 2020-02-22   OBJECT

I write on behalf to voice my concerns about this application from the University ofBristol.

We have not been consulted as local neighbours on this application, and having viewed theapplication we are deeply concerned about the wider issues that this proposal raises and wouldlike these considerations to be included within any planning permission granted by the Council.

1. Car Parking: We are already living in a student "ghetto" with ongoing issues and problems withcar parking, rubbish and noise in Highbury Villas. There is already pressure on parking locally withcontractor vans and our fear is that this application will exacerbate the already serious parkingissues that we have in Highbury Villas. We propose therefore, that this application is only grantedif the University can guarantee that there will be NO impact on the already difficult parkingsituation in Highbury Villas.

We propose therefore, that this application is only granted if the university can guarantee thatthere will be NO impact on the already difficult parking situation in Highbury Villas caused bycontractors vehicles and that the University will make provision for these vehicles to be parkedwithin University premises.

2. Contractors Rubbish: We already have ongoing issues with rubbish from the student housesand we do not want to have this increased by rubbish resulting from any construction work. T More

work and contractors will only serve to increase this problem unless proper provision is made.

We propose therefore, that this application is only granted if the university can guarantee that theywill make provision for the removal of all rubbish caused from these proposed construction worksand confirm that there will be NO impact on the already difficult situation in Highbury Villas.

4. Site Access, Working Hours and Noise: We are concerned about the potential issues that couldbe caused by site access and noise to the surrounding neighbourhood and homes, especially ifthe working hours are extended beyond the working day and to weekends.

We propose therefore, that this application is only granted if the university can guarantee that:

a) access to the site will only be from Woodland Road and that NO access will be given tocontractors to access the site from Highbury Villas.

b) that NO work will take place on the site outside normal working hours (say from 8am to 6pmMonday to Friday) nor at weekends to disturb the peace of the local neighbourhood and theneighbours.

c) that the University clarify the proposals made to protect the peace and limit the disturbance toall the neighbours in Highbury Villas and especially to the adjacent neighbour living in the mewshouse next to the proposed site.

In conclusion, we consider that this application needs to take into account the serious concernsthat we have as adjacent neighbours and can only be granted if these concerns are addressedwith specific conditions as noted above that can help alleviate the impact this development willhave on the local community.

on 2020-02-22   OBJECT

As I commented on the sister application regarding pedestrianisation of the area,I amsick of the Behemoth that is the University of Bristol flexing its monetary muscles and potentiallymaking life a misery for long-term residents.

Why, in this era of cutting student contact hours, does the University wish to increaseinfrastructure? I commented on the aesthetics of their proposal the first time around. However, myreal objection regards the complete inconvenience and disruption this development would causelocally.

WE DO NOT WANT MORE WHITE VANS in this area. I have also noticed that recently, manyuniversity trades people turn up in their cars (have they been advised to do so by the Uni as localresidents have explicitly told the Uni people they are sick of vans taking up spaces?)

Can you imagine what the area would be like for probably several years if you pass this - miseryfor 52 weeks of each year for real residents who are rate payers. Limited angst for students whovisit the area only and anyway, pay no rates.

I moved to Bristol as it was supposed to be a good place to live. I am no longer so sure - pleasestop the university and tell them in no uncertain terms to curb their ambitions before Bristol istotally spoiled for its real residents.

on 2020-02-21   SUPPORT

This is an excellent addition to Bristol's diverse set of iconic buildings. It is hearteningthat the University is investing in a library. Fantastic efforts have been made in the plans toalleviate traffic congestion in an area where it is simple good luck that we don't see dailyaccidents.

on 2020-02-21   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-21   SUPPORT

As a senior member of the University of Bristol's Library Services, I am committed to thebuilding of a new University Library on the Hawthorns' site. The design has been developedaccording to a set of principles which will ensure that the building is inclusive, accessible, inspiring,adaptable, sustainable, and supports the well-being of all who visit it. The new library will bringmany benefits to both University and local Bristol communities. It will offer students, academicsand visitors a place to come together to read, discuss, and share ideas in spaces which offer lotsof natural light and are carefully designed to support learning and research. The ground floor willprovide a warm welcome to the public offering opportunities to visit and experience carefullycurated exhibition spaces showcasing the rich and unique cultural (Special and Theatre)collections held by the University. There will be reading room spaces for those who wish to furtherengage in research of the Cultural Collections, and there will be opportunities to join in withacademic and cultural events held in the events space. There will also be spaces to meet up withfriends in the café at the front of the building. This building will genuinely offer new and excitingspaces for people to come together to learn and enjoy. I fully support this planning application.

on 2020-02-21   OBJECT

As a long time resident living in Old Park, St Michaels I very much object to thisproposed building.

That this building will be a Library and open to the public is a cynical sham. The University alreadyhas a huge library on St Michaels Hill, that they DO NOT let the general public into it, believe me Ihave tried to go in on many occassions.

Woodland road is an important thouroughfare in the area. Reducing traffic flow through it willincrease congestion around the triangle, or down historic St Michaels Hill of over to Arley Hill. TheUniversity only operates for 8-9 months of the year yet they wish to inconvenience local peopleeven when they are not there with their blockage of long established rights of way.

Bristol University is no longer the place of acadenic brilliance it once was, it has become abusiness farming foreign students. Why should people living locally subsidise this? I parked mycar briefly in one of the University car parks near St Michael church the day before Christlas Eve.The car park was empty save for 10 or 12 cars (it takes about 120 cars). I returned to find aparking ticket stuck to the screen along with tickets stuck on other cars. They wanted £100 forparking there "Illegally"! Make no mistake, Bristol University is in it for the money, and their futureplans are cetainly not in the interests of local people.

on 2020-02-21   OBJECT

I approve of the scheme's location and aims.

I object to two aspects of the external design:

1. Most importantly, the building is much too tall for the area and will dominate in an unfortunateway the other impressive buildings close by, notably the BGS hall and the Wills Physics Building.As well as impacting on those larger buildings, it would totally dwarf the neighbouring traditionalstone-faced ninetheenth century buildings. It should have a larger footprint and reduced height.

2. The facing of the building is not in keeping, and would sit awkwardly with, the surroundings. Itshould be rethought.

These two aspects would seriously and adversely affect the character of the area.

on 2020-02-21   SUPPORT

A very impressive, striking design which will add to the rich architectural heritage of thecampus.

Benefits to the community will also be significant.

.

on 2020-02-21   SUPPORT

At last a new landmark building for Bristol to be proud of. The university has employedtalented internationally acclaimed architects who have created a contemporary building and a civicsquare. An enjoyable, safer and great community space for all - giving public access to the newfood court in Senate House, the university library facilities and the wonderful Royal Fort Gardens.There is even a 'Changing Places' facility, which would be only the 3rd in the city centre.

on 2020-02-21   OBJECT

Both in size and design this is a building more suited to the new Temple MeadsCampus than the Woodland Road site. Far from relating sympathetically to the scale ofneighbouring properties the proposed building would dominate its surroundings and have aharmful overbearing effect.The University's Strategic masterplan (Supplementary Planning Document 11) describes theConservation Area as characterised by 'detached Victorian villas' creating 'a regular rhythm to thedevelopment along Elton Road and Woodland Avenue. It is important that the composition of anew building on the site responds to the nature of development on these streets and thereforeavoids becoming too monolithic'. Monolithic is precisely what the effect of the building would be, itsheight dominating the skyline from all directions and in dwarfing the nearby Grade II listed BristolGrammar School would result in substantial harm to the Conservation Area.

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

Dear teamI think this proposal is fantastic. The building will be a striking addition (and a positive one) to thelocal area whilst in keeping with the senate house opposite in terms of proportions.It will be a great opportunity for a library with exhibitions to be available to the students, staff andlocal communityI support this application

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

This is a great opportunity for the city to approve a scheme that would re-purpose a verylow quality building and create an iconic building befitting of our great city. Fantastic vision,ambition and just looks superb.

on 2020-02-20   OBJECT

The Hawthorns whilst once a attractive building now looks faded and unloved ,a newlibrary would complement the Grammar School and the University.

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-20   OBJECT

Comment: I am a Lecturer at University of Bristol and a resident of Kingsdown. I passthis site on a daily basis. I fully support redevelopment of The Hawthorns site, but the proposedstructure would represent a degradation of the environment in surrounding streets. It is too large,and would result in the area simply becoming part of a campus, with an 'enclosed' feel. Nor is thestyle of the building in keeping with the surrounding area - it seems an attempt to dominate, ratherthan exist alongside.

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

I generally support this development. But I think it is crucial to make sure that thebuilding fits its environment, in particular that the walls of the building are in a stone finish, ratherthan the grey concrete that can be found in many buildings across Bristol.

on 2020-02-20   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-19   OBJECT

I am all for the creation of more cycle paths but they need to be fully segregated frompedestrian and motor traffic. As a partially sighted person who walks by this area to work, theunsegregated nature of the path in the city centre causes injury and distress to myself and this willmake it worse. Please alter the scheme so the cycle path is fully segregated.

on 2020-02-19   OBJECT

Regarding shared cycle/pedestrian infrastructure:Cycle routes should be CLEARLY separated from pedestrians - you only have to look at thecentre/fountains cycle paths to realise this! Such subtle 'marking' simply means both sets of userssuffer.

on 2020-02-19  

My main issue is the proposed cycling infrastructure. This is a perfect time to installforward thinking and effective SEGREGATED cycle lanes, separate from pedestrians so there isno confusion. Just see all the shared cycle paths in Bristol to see what a navigational headache itcan cause for both pedestrians and cyclists. They are barely visible or noticeable as cycle lanes sopedestrians naturally walk in them. Please think this through seriously. Bristol clams to be acycling city but it's infrastructure does not in any shape or form currently reflect that.

on 2020-02-19   SUPPORT

As a Bristol Alumni I am in support of the project to develop a new Arts and SocialSciences Library. The campus, students and community would greatly benefit. This project hasbeen long awaited.

on 2020-02-19   OBJECT

Shared pedestrian/cycle paths are a terrible idea. They just bring the different user intoconflict. Either build a proper cycle lane (see here for some guidancehttps://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/publications-and-reports/streets-toolkit), or don't bother.The council should not accept planning applications that include sub-par cycling infrastructure.

on 2020-02-19   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-19  

The design supports diversity of species and green infrastructure (including waterattenuation) within the limits of the site. Consideration has been made with regards to the welfare,not only of University staff and students; but also for those of the Grammar School, visitors andmembers of the public - especially with regards to pedestrian use of the site.

The public square ensures the space is increasingly accessible, for all abilities; is more appealingas a public space (providing for seating, 'linger' space, routes through to the Royal Fort gardenand events). It will be more attractive - from the perspective of providing a cleaner contemporaryurban realm - and views. And it will enable a 'secure' location which promotes pedestrian andcycling use. This is a opportunity for the University to provide a civic space in support of BristolCity Council objectives.

The quality of materials are high, in support of the conservation area strategy and thedevelopment should therefore be supported.

on 2020-02-19   SUPPORT

As a long-standing member of Library staff I believe the University needs a new Librarybuilding and I hope it will support students and learning for many years to come.

It's not often we have the chance to build a new library on this scale, and it would be very sad tosee the opportunity lost, or delayed (this has been a long-term aspiration).

Libraries do not only benefit the people who use them; the education and research they supportcan have far-reaching and long-lasting benefits for many, in ways that might not be immediatelytangible or apparent. I hope people can see the bigger picture, and recognise the value of havinga brand new Library of this quality and scale in Bristol.

I believe the site is a good choice, being at the heart of the University campus, and it seemsinclusive to open up the Ground Floor to everyone, creating a new civic space for exhibitions andevents.

I hope it will be an inspirational and productive new development for Bristol.

on 2020-02-19   OBJECT

Whilst this is a much needed facility to replace the University's Arts and Social Scienceslibrary this design is entirely inappropriate for the location. It's height and volume are far too largefor the plot and the surrounding buildings and the design is out of keeping with all the otherbuildings. It is monolithic and uninspiring and does not enhance the public realm with a positivedesign contribution, it does not represent the best of modern design which such a site shouldwarrant.

on 2020-02-18   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-18   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-18  

Unfortunately I feel the need to submit an objection, but only regarding one aspect ofthe application - the treatment of the cycle route through the new pedestrianised square. I amdoing this as both a local councillor for a ward that borders the site, and as someone who regularlycycles along Woodland Road.

I raised this concern during the consultation in October and I am frustrated at having to repeatmyself.

Here's what I fed back in the consultation:

"I am really worried about the shared pedestrian/cyclist space. This rarely works well. Pleaseensure you learn from the mistakes made in the city centre with the new area by the Hippodrome.Extremely poorly marked shared space which makes pedestrians and cyclists scared andannoyed on a daily basis. e.g. seehttps://www.facebook.com/groups/bristolcyclists/permalink/2770039809693660/Please proactively seek input from walking and cycling interest groups and charities and try to dobest practice. Please do not force different road users into conflict. Segregated routes arepreferable, or if this is not possible, at least ensure VERY clear marking. Subtle symbols andsubtle changes in pavement surface are NOT ENOUGH."

I am therefore very disappointed to discover that my advice has not been taken seriously, indeed

the opposite, as the applicant is actively seeking to mimic the design that I advised against. Seepages 40-41 of the Transport Assessment and Travel Plan(https://planningonline.bristol.gov.uk/online-applications/files/FC00E0CFCEBB7563383AA7AC88334791/pdf/20_00433_F-TRANSPORT_AND_TRAVEL_PLAN_-_DESIGN_AND_ACCESS_STATEMENT_APPENDIX_10-2453649.pdf).

If the applicants, officers or committee do not realise how frustrating and unsafe the shared spaceby the Hippodrome is, I invite them to join me on a cycle through the area at evening rush hour.

This site forms part of national cycle route 4, through a former 'cycling city' that has declared aClimate Emergency, but we apparently still can't get safe segregated cycling routes right, andrepeatedly force cyclists and pedestrians into conflict with one another, which helps no-one.

Please please please reconsider the treatment of this cycle route to make it segregated if possible,or at least much more clearly delineated.

on 2020-02-18   OBJECT

I echo Councillor Carla Denyer's objection re: the proposed cycle path. As it is currentlydesigned, without kerb segregation or substantial differentiation by colour or texture, the cycle pathlets down visually impaired and vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists by encouraging conflict. Thisaspect of the development may fail the equalities impact assessment of this decision for thisreason.

The developer's claim that Sustrans advised on non segregation may be in error, perhaps basedon a flawed assumption of a low number of users. Sustrans may have given accurate advice thatwas conveniently interpreted by the developer. Either way, the assertion that segregation is notnecessary here is false. The area is on the Nationals Cycling Network and with eBike and scooternumbers set to increase substantially numbers of users will only increase.

I encourage decision makers in this application to require the developer to install kerbedsegregation to the cycle element of this scheme. If this is not possible, a minimum of a brightcolour differentiation scheme should be mandated (e.g. bright blurb London cycle superhighwaypaint). The example of the grey-on-grey paving on Bristol Centre should not be followed.

on 2020-02-18   OBJECT

The cycle route needs better emphasis, it blends in with the surrounding surfaces andwill result in pedestrians and cyclists colliding or cyclists reverting to the road to avoid the hassle

on 2020-02-18   OBJECT

As a UoB student I would very much enjoy the new library and fully support it. HoweverI feel very strongly that the cycle path idea needs to be reformed. I was informed that it wouldresemble the (dangerous) subtle markings in the Centre, but the Woodland Road ones need to bemuch more clearly marked, and ideally separated by a physical barrier. As well as this, theplacement of the U1 bus stop outside the Hawthorns needs to be moved, as at peak times moststudents walk into the road in order to get past the massive crowd. The bus stop would just haveto be moved to a wider pedestrian area.

on 2020-02-17   SUPPORT

Good to make a bold statement with new buildings. No point in spending millions andyears of planning to create something bland.

The open ground floor access to the general public should connect well with a wider Bristolaudience.

Paving roadways to focus on pedestrian priority over vehicles is the direction Bristol as a wholeshould be heading. Perhaps the council should insist on the pedestrianisation being moreextensive, stretching down Elton Road to benefit BGS pupils, with access only for staff anddeliveries to BGS.

on 2020-02-17   SUPPORT

As a University member of staff, I am in support of this development.

Further to this, as a former resident of the Cotham area without connection to the University whofor a long time felt the University Library was a space that could have been more open to accessby others in the community to the benefit of the community and the University, I welcome the plansto make this a space which is more accessible. I have been fortunate to enjoy such access madeavailable by other institutions in regions such as Germany (Munich) and Mexico (Oaxaca) andhave valued the ethos that values access to learning and connection between people. In this way,the plans go some way to providing the spaces with the intention to do so. I believe the projectshould enact this approach on an ongoing basis into the future to the benefit of those looking toaccess learning in the area and be held to this in planning permissions.

I am unable to comment on the impact of the building design or infrastructure at this time.However, I would hope that the local residential community and others that share the space (e.g.education providers) have been consulted on any impacts foreseen from their perspectives. Itseems to me that these should carry more weight than the perspectives of visitors or employeesliving at distance or working in other locations.

on 2020-02-17   OBJECT

The general ideas of a new library, pedestrianisation, and a Campus Heart are great,and we really need that at the University (where I have worked since 1996).

BUT, the design of the building is appalling - looks like Prince Charles' "monstrous carbuncle of adesign". It is way over the top, it is totally out of keeping with the other "new-ish" universitybuildings put up in the past 20 years or so (Merchant Venturers Building, the extension to QueensBuilding, the modernisation of the Priory Road Complex, the Sports Centre (2001). It isn't evenproposed to faced in a nice material - it looks like a 60s concrete car park block! By all means,keep the interior of the building with its proposed uses, but please change the outside.

on 2020-02-17   SUPPORT

This will be a fantastic asset for the students who deserve world class library facilities,as well as locals who will also have access. There have been comments about the safety for BGSpupils. There is certainly a place for improving the road layout to make them safer alongside theplanning process for the new library, and overall we need to be designing for a future where carsdon't get such blanket prioritisation, especially in an area with high pedestrian use such as theWoodland Road/Tyndall Ave area.

Yes the design is radical, and it will be impressive. I believe Bristol can carry it off. As someoneelse said - who wants bland?

on 2020-02-17   SUPPORT

I am fully aware that with a new library comes change, inconvenience, a building site,and disruption. But I feel any institution, especially one such as Bristol University that calls itself acivic university, must put its money where its mouth is. It must ensure to invest it is fit for a futurein which students will need the very, very best support to be able to enter a highly competitive jobmarket. It must invest in a future where it enables its staff to do their very best work, both in thefields of research and teaching. And they must, as they always have been, be a beacon to thewider community and make the fruits of that labour as widely available as possible, with as littleobstacle as possible. I see in the plans for the new library a new space for all this to happen. Thefact that the much acclaimed but under-celebrated cultural collections will have a hub they cantruly call their own is of monumental importance. The fact that exhibition spaces, spaces to meetand room to collaborate in lots of different ways are all part of the current proposals indicate to mea real shift in what this university wants to represent, and make possible. In making these plans, ofcourse the university must be considerate of its neighbours and their wishes. It's only in workingtogether that the end result becomes truly fit for purpose. But change is needed. I couldn't supportthese proposals more.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

When I came to Bristol in 2010 as Winterstoke Professor of English Literature Iremember discussing at my interview the prospect of a new University library. I have worked inuniversities here and in the USA and it was clear to me then that Bristol's position as a majorresearch and teaching institution, able to take its place at the international top table, would beenormously enhanced by a world-class library. I am now on the point of retirement, so my owninterests aren't any longer an issue, but my view hasn't changed, and I think this project is manyyears overdue. The University is one of the powerhouses of the city's economy and cultural status,and it is of clear mutual benefit that this should go ahead. I hope to live long enough to attend theopening ceremony!

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

I think the plan creates a space which, while obviously serving and supporting theUniversity community, will also (and most crucially) benefit people outside of the University bycreating space and resource to bring us in to engage and benefit from the space, resources,opportunities and possibilities that can happen in and around the new library.Our city is not a museum and it must evolve. I am thrilled at the prospect of a new inspiringbuilding which will be of wide benefit and inspiration.I really like the sense of light and space the design will bring - the very opposite to what I usuallythink of in relation to big libraries!

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

I am in support of this opportunity it will be a fantastic resource it will be for theUniversity and the city!

on 2020-02-14   OBJECT

I strongly object to a piece of Bristol's heritage being ripped down and replaced by abuilding so out of keeping with the local landscape that I honestly can't believe that this design hasbeen approved. I am all for a new library building but it should be in keeping with its surroundingsand not involve demolishing a building that is surely listed. The design for this new building is,quite frankly, horrendous.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

The University of Bristol has for a long time lacked a real centre. This project offers afantastic opportunity to build a civic core to a great institution, as well as sorting out the complexand sometimes dangerous traffic junction on Woodland Road.

on 2020-02-14  

I walk past this site every day, and regularly use the Hawthorns for coffee etc. Thecurrent building definitely needs to go, it's absolutely shocking in so many ways. The plans for thenew library look pretty awe inspiring, but I'm wondering if it's just a little on the big size. I canappreciate it's a statement building that the university will no doubt be very proud of, but it'sHUGE. If it could be scaled back so it's at least similar in size to Senate House I think this wouldhelp to ensure buy in from many of the doubters.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

This is a landmark project that will offer significantly enhanced cultural resources for thecity and its visitors via the open-access ground-floor exhibition and collections spaces. It willenable more people (including schools) to access the Theatre Collection, which has designatedmuseum status.

It will transform the public realm to improve traffic flows and reduce the risk to pedestrians. Thecreation of a public square between Senate House and the Library will provide a vibrant andwelcoming new public realm for the city.

The building is of world-class architectural quality and will be an asset to the city. It has beendesigned to reflect the local environment and sit comfortably within the footprint of the site.

on 2020-02-14  

I am in full support of the Hawthorns being replaced. As an employee of the university Ihave to use this building for training, and find it to be a depressing space that feels aged; it is indire need of updating.I agree that a design of architectural significance would be an asset to the city, and very muchwanted to like the chosen design, but it is quite hard to like. The feeling that the upper part is goingto topple off is uncomfortable, and one feels that the design prioritises striking, over pleasing.I am very much pleased, as a resident of the city, that the university is investing in a new library,which is backing up their intention to become a more civic university, and give back to the city, andthe future generations.I do share concerns that the new road plans have not sufficiently assess the risk to the grammarschool students, who cross it throughout the day, often with the usual lack of care that children canhave when absorbed by their school day.As a cyclist I would like their to be consideration of cycle routes through the pedestrian area.Finally, as an alumni of the university, I am very glad that the university is investing in a new libraryfor future students, to ensure that the university is able to provide resources to support theexcellent research and teaching for which they are known.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

Hi, from what I can see, this is a great opportunity to provide fantastic facilities andlibrary services to both university students and the local community. In terms of improving the localarea and adding social and economic value to the city I would think this is a fantastic development.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

I write on behalf of the Trustees of the SS Great Britain and the Brunel Institute in strongsupport of this planning application.The SS Great Britain Trust and the Brunel Institute is an affiliate and collaborator with theUniversity of Bristol, and it cares for the National Brunel Collection. We understand the importanceof preserving our great heritage and learning held in archive and library collections, but particularlyin making those available not only to researchers, students but especially to the general public fortheir enjoyment and education. This new library delivers a fantastic leap forward in the provisionfor students and the general public alike. No longer will the treasures of the university be kepthidden away but will now be available for all. This is strongly to be welcomed by the city as awhole - this is a people's library now, and it has clearly been designed as such. People will want togo there.The ground floor exhibition and display functions will open up this landmark building for all comers,and will give real identity to the heart of university learning. The Trust anticipates furthercollaboration and displays between the Brunel Institute and the proposed exhibition facilities in thisnew library, and these will be geared to an audience not only of students but of the localcommunity too.Such a big step in public provision and student excellence deserves a landmark building toshowcase the library for the whole city to see, and to be welcomed into. And this design, modifiednow in good response to the consultation exercise, exceeds our expectations. The Trusteesconsider that the proposed design may well become one of the highest quality tall buildingsstanding in the city. It will greatly improve the sense of place at the top of the hill, and provide a

proper and good looking end piece to the rather unwieldy current row of university buildings thatstretch along Tyndall's Park Road. It is not out of scale, but just right in its landscape, and theTrustees commend it to the committee.

on 2020-02-14   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-14   OBJECT

I do not object the new library building itself - much better than the first design, and aninnovative building in an exciting new design. I also welcome the public access / museum spaceswithin the building.However, I OBJECT to the 'public realm' ie closing part of Woodland Road to through traffic tomake a pedestrianised area. This diverts buses up to St Michael's Hill, and would mean othervehicles also diverted. I have detailed my objections more fully in response to planning application20/00197/F, but in summary: the part of St Michael's Hill between Tyndall Avenue and Tyndall'sPark Road is a dangerous stretch of road. At peak times it is very busy with pedestrians (many ofthem students) who walk in the road because pavements are so narrow. On Fridays (bin days) thepavement is cluttered with wheelie bins. Buses mount the pavement to pass other buses, deliveryvans etc. Traffic is held up with deliveries to the White Bear and the Co-op. More traffic would be adisaster, particularly a danger to pedestrians. Local residents have long maintained that thisstretch of road is the site of an accident waiting to happen with a pedestrian injured.I also OBJECT to the principle of the University creating a 'campus'. It's city centre Uni, and itdoesn't own a campus - even though it labels its maps with a coloured 'campus' whose boundariesinclude local roads (like mine) with residential properties that have nothing to do with the Uni.What arrogance! This attitude is also demonstrated by the flag currently in Tyndall Avenue whichstates (I quote the exact wording) "Our new University Library with galleries, cultural collectionsand a cafe opens in 2023/24". This before they have got planning permission!The land-grabbing attempt to create a 'campus' is a vanity project of no benefit to students andconsiderable disadvantage to local residents.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

Please start building this proposal as soon as possible.

on 2020-02-13   OBJECT

I am a parent of children at the Bristol Grammar School and have concerns about thesafety for those pedestrians using Elton road which will have increased volume of traffic under thecurrent proposed plans (with the pedestrian area forcing more traffic down Elton road). I amparticularly concerned as those using Elton road (I.e. the children) are more vulnerable road usersand extra care and consideration needs to be given to optimise their safety which I don't feel thecurrent plan provides. It will increase pollution on Elton road and again children are morevulnerable to the effects of this. A pedestrianised area is in principle a good idea but not at theexpense of the safety and health of children using Elton road and this aspect of the plan needs tobe amended.

on 2020-02-13   OBJECT

I think that the Hawthorns should be preserved not destroyed.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

A member of staff at the University that would like to see increased staff and studentwell being facilities that work well with the local community as well.

Many uni buildings are old and energy inefficent - very much in support of a user friendly ,sustainable building.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-13   OBJECT

Whilst I agree with the new buildings, I strongly object to the fact that Tyndalls Avenueand Elton Road aren't going to be fully pedestrianised. I understand you are pandering tobackhanders from rich 4x4 driving parents, but realistically there is absolutely no reason for trafficto be using these two roads.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

As a retired member of staff of the University, I strongly support this. The new library isdesperately needed for academic reasons and the envisaged multi-use building which will also actas a community hub and landmark, promises to make a very exciting addition to the city.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

Would be amazing for the city to have such a landmark building! Fully support this.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

I thoroughly support the application as it will greatly enhance the campus and will be ofenormous benefit to the people of Bristol by providing open access to the archives and specialcollections. I have a long standing association with the University Theatre Collection and haveworked to raise the profile of this international archive by curating two exhibitions which alsofeatured the work of Bristol based print makers.

on 2020-02-13   SUPPORT

I support this proposal. It is well thought through, and will be of value both for theuniversity and for the local community.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

I think the design for the new University Library is not sympathetic to the existingbuildings at all, and will demolish a much enjoyed building (The Hawthorns) at a huge cost for notmuch gain.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

This development will not only enhance the University of Bristol but bring elegance tothe City of Bristol and further make available a world class facility for research to the entire peopleof Bristol and beyond. This can also promote tourism.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

As a Lecturer at the University of Bristol, I fully support the building. It is vital for thedevelopment of the university and the city. This is needed to support adequate services to our verysuccessful teaching and research activities.

I would also highlight that the planning includes a provision to open part of the library to all Bristolcitizens and the library should become a key cultural asset for the city.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I wholeheartedly support this project, not only as a beautiful and much needed newspace and resource for the University of Bristol but, perhaps more importantly, as a new andexciting public space.

The scheme presents a golden opportunity for University and Council to reach out together to thepeople of Bristol, and especially to young learners from across the city, with a message about theimportance and value of reading, learning, thinking and cultural awareness. Thanks to itsthoughtful design, the new building and its resources will extend a welcome that transcends allsocio-economic and cultural barriers and as such, it will be an asset to our city for manygenerations to come.

on 2020-02-12  

The University has the highest debt in the country. This reckless spending will end upbadly damaging its operations and staff, who are citizen of Bristol city.University does not need another library to sit in, most materials are online anyway.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

This new building will transform the area, and bring an ageing facility in line with otherswithin this conservation boundary.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I am in full support of this redevelopment.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

The proposed building is to be built in a conservation area. My view is that it is too largeand too out of character for its surroundings. This view acknowledges that there already exist largeUniversity-owned buildings nearby. I also understand the desire to create an "architecturalstatement" but there is plenty of evidence that this can be done without upsetting the balance ofthe area in a way that this building appears to be designed to do. A building of a more modestheight with more of a character in keeping with area would be appropriate.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

I believe this will be a valuable addition to the University campus and a useful space forBristol residents.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I believe this will be a valuable addition to the University campus and a useful space forBristol residents.

(accidentally clicked object instead of support, please delete previous submission)

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

The public area would be a better and safer space for students and the widercommunity.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

The planned library is an iconic building and it will mark the entrance to the campusarea. Some objectors note its size, but a smaller building would not fulfil the function of being acore library for a large university. It matches the height of Senate House. opposite, but will befaced in stone to match neighbouring, older buildings. The current Hawthorns building is amishmash of multiple houses linked by ugly brick corridors and so cannot be argued to be much ofan asset to the area. Improving pedestrianisation will help cope with the huge numbers of peoplewalking in the area, and make an attractive spot for all the citizens of Bristol.

on 2020-02-12  

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I think this is a great design and plan. Fully support this.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

This looks like a great addition to the library spaces in the city at a time when librariesare under attack generally. The open public elements of this proposal are really important and thisis a nice complement to the theatre at the grammar school nearby. Iconic design too, great for thecity.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I am looking forward to this new development, which will bring enhanced access tolearning and knowledge.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

This is a fantastic new building that would rejuvenate the neighbourhood and add worldclass cultural, science and learning facilities not only to the university's but the wider citycommunity. Much needed addition to the area, replacing the drab collection of edifices that makeup Hawthorns, and revitalising the precinct.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

Having worked for the University of Bristol for 20 years, I am very familiar with thelocation and surrounding area of the proposed new library building. The appearance and scale ofthe new building is totally at odds with the buildings in the immediate vicinity (with the possibleexception of the extraordinarily unattractive Senate House), including a number of historicbuildings, on Elton Road and Woodland Road.While the ever increasing size of the University's student population and the inadequacy of theexisting study space does suggest that that additional study space needs to be found, this shouldnot be at the cost of constructing a towering glass cuboid carbuncle which will dominate thelandscape.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I think this would be a great asset to Bristol and a unique resource to the city. I fullysupport this application

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

First, I must say that I am a current 3rd year mature PhD student at the University ofBristol. Though that might make me seem to have an ongoing stake, I should point out that myprogramme of research finishes at the end of year 4.

Secondly, I support the current proposals submitted by the University. Over the past few years Ihave frequently visited the city and the campus. Apart from some notable buildings and somemodern similar on Tyndall Avenue, the central campus can seem a little dowdy at times. A'flagship' new building - particularly one which is both a hub and an academic resource is welcometo my mind.

Thirdly, though I broadly welcome the establishment of a pedestrianised area in the plans, I urgesome caution owing to those, like myself, with limited mobility (and travelling in from outlyingdistricts and consequently incurring much extra expense) potentially being de facto 'locked out' ofthe area.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

The proposed building is absolutely hideous and not in any way shape or form inkeeping with any of the houses, the Grammar School, and the University's own buildings, it sticksout like a sore thumb.

Also, the Hawthorns is a iconic building in its own right, and should be preserved. Surely it is alisted building?

I object to both the demolition of the Hawthorns, and the building of the monstrosity.

If the Hawthorns isn't listed and has to go, the other proposals where the building integrated intothe surrounding buildings are much more preferred.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

This is a fantastic project that will greatly enhance the facilities for students, staff andcommunity as well as adding a world class building to the University precinct. I hope the counciland community will offer its full support.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

I feel this will really improve the public space and feel of Tyndall Avenue, benefiting bothstudents and the public.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

1. this pushes traffic up the narrow St Michaels Park , past the University nurserythereby increasing the pollution for the under 5's attending here and then forcing this traffic tomake an exit onto the busy St Michaels Hill. I do not consider this to be well thought through.2. The proposed building is out of sympathy with both its position and the buildings around it. It is,to borrow a phrase from Prince Charles, a monstrous carbuncle of a design and does nothing toenhance the environment.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

I object strongly as I feel that the design and scale of the building are totally out ofkeeping with the adjacent properties on Woodland Road and Elton Road, and that the proposedchanges to the road layout will force traffic to funnel down Elton Road which will negatively impactthe air quality for and physical safety of pupils and staff of Bristol Grammar School which occupiesbuildings on both sides of that road.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

As a parent of children attending the school and as someone who frequently visits thearea I strongly object to the University's proposals. Firstly I strongly object to the proposal for thepedestrianisation of part of Woodland Road and the reconfiguration of the traffic flow. This isalready a hugely congested area with cars and students alike. I feel that pedestrianising somestreets and forcing cars down Elton road will add to this problem and cause gridlock whentravelling around the area. The school has a large catchment area and many parents are forced touse their car. It is already hugely congested with limited parking available I feel this will make iteven more congested and dangerous. I am concerned it will make this area dangerous andpolluted for all the students at the school. The pavements are already dangerous and difficult tonavigate with how busy the area is.

I am concerned about the noise, pollution and disruption in the construction of this building whentrying to get my children safely to and from school.

The number of students now is far in excess of what the area can support and I don't see why thecommunity should suffer yet more change. The university is proposing this for their own needswithout considering the needs of the surrounding residents, businesses and the school. TheUniversity has appropriated this area by stealth, slowly buying up all the property completely for itsown needs. It may need to extend its library facilities but this already hugely congested, residentialarea is not the place.

Parking is also a real issue as we will lose more parking places with the closure of WoodlandRoad which will push cars even more into the residential areas where there is already a problemdue to all the multiple-occupancy.

I also strongly object to the size and design of the building. It is not an attractive building and doesnot fit in with the other surrounding buildings which have much history and character. The size ofthe building would make it an eyesore on the surrounding area, the size of it would be toodominant in the area. I think the hawthorns building is a lovely building and could be modified forthe universities requirements rather than building this.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

I am a former student of the University of Bristol and am now a Senior Lecturer at theUniversity. I am also a resident of Kingsdown. I therefore pass this site on a daily basis (usually bybike).There are many elements of this scheme that I support (the open and accessible nature of theground floor, the opportunity to showcase the Theatre Collection, the environmental credentials ofthe building, enhanced cycle and bus routes, etc.). However, I must object to the plans as theycurrently stand.I chose Bristol for my undergraduate degree because it was *not* a campus university. Trying tocreate a 'campus university' through development of this site is wrong. The proposed building ismonolithic. Its scale is entirely wrong for the site: it will dominate Woodland Road and thesurrounding streets. It is not in keeping with the area. It is ugly and brutalist. The University hassuccessfully completed other building projects that enhance their surroundings rather than impairthem: I urge the University and its architects to go back to the drawing board with this project.

on 2020-02-12   SUPPORT

It will be wonderful to have a new space for the public in bristol. Its a culture hungry citywhich needs to maintain its growing reputation. It's also great the uni is opening its doors andamenities to the city which will provide a deeper relationship.

on 2020-02-12   OBJECT

I object fully to this horrendous destruction of a Bristol landmark, to be replaced by aneven more horrendous and ugly, out of place monstrosity. The proposed new building iscompletely out of place with the surrounding area. The idea of a new library I think is a wonderfulidea but more thought the the local neighbourhood needs to be given and NOT just the Universitystudents. There are more than just students in this area and we are being pushed out of an areawe love and care for.

on 2020-02-10   SUPPORT

I strongly support the planning application. As Director of Library Services at Bristol, Iappreciate the urgent necessity to increase the space and facilities to provide an adequate libraryservice to a growing, successful and research intensive university. But I have also been workingvery closely with Bristol City Libraries and the UWE Library to ensure a collaborative andcomplementary approach to library services across the city. While not seeking to replace eachother's mission, there are many opportunities to share resources, audiences and vision for a betterBristol.University Libraries throughout the UK have barriers. While the New University Library is, ofnecessity, for the university, we have "broken the rules" in designing barrier free access to all theexciting facilities on the ground floor of the new library. This will become a great asset to thecommunity.As a tax payer, I endorse the civic amenity and improved public realm provided by this scheme.

on 2020-02-10   SUPPORT

I fully support this development proposal. The current building is not attractive, and itwould be great to see the area improved with a contemporary building. The surrounding area(pavements and street) are currently hazardous in terms of irregularities in the pavement (I havewitnessed several people fall in the area and require medical attention), the pedestrian crossingnot well-lit or signed, parents at BGS regularly parking across yellow lines, on the corner etc.Having a better managed and pedestrianised area outside would be a vast improvement andmake access through the area much more practical for those of us who try to rely on walkingrather than driving in Bristol..

The importance of an organisation that believes and acts on its responsibility to the community iscrucial. The University is demonstrating its responsibility by improving public spaces, opening upparts of the library to the public, investing in opportunities for all of Bristol (and those beyond) tointeract with its collections in this new building, and investing in the students that are in their careby providing improved spaces to study and engage with their peers. Libraries contribute to thecultural ecology of the city, and with recent decisions to close many of the libraries across the city,I would urge the council to support this development.

on 2020-02-10   SUPPORT

I fully support this development proposal. The current building is not attractive, and itwould be great to see the area improved with a contemporary building. The surrounding area(pavements and street) are currently hazardous in terms of irregularities in the pavement (I havewitnessed several people fall in the area and require medical attention), the pedestrian crossingnot well-lit or signed, parents at BGS regularly parking across yellow lines, on the corner etc.Having a better managed and pedestrianised area outside would be a vast improvement andmake access through the area much more practical for those of us who try to rely on walkingrather than driving in Bristol..

The importance of an organisation that believes and acts on its responsibility to the community iscrucial. The University is demonstrating its responsibility by improving public spaces, opening upparts of the library to the public, investing in opportunities for all of Bristol (and those beyond) tointeract with its collections in this new building, and investing in the students that are in their careby providing improved spaces to study and engage with their peers. Libraries contribute to thecultural ecology of the city, and with recent decisions to close many of the libraries across the city,I would urge the council to support this development.

on 2020-02-10   OBJECT

The proposed building would dominant the skyline, plans of the East Elevation showthat it dwarfs the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School and the adjacent building in Woodland, itis even taller than the Senate House building. It would completely change the character of thisarea which is as noted a suburban area of high quality tree-lined streets and large detached villas.

In this setting the building is too large and its appearance is unsuitable being of contrastingcharacter to the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School, and the old Baptist college, together withthe rest of Woodland Road in a northerly direction.A smaller building of similar style would bemore acceptable.

It should also be noted that whilst Hawthorns has undergone undesirable alteration it is alandmark and fits it surrounding more satisfactory than the proposed building. Hawthorns is also abuilding of considerable age being built in 1888, as four separate villas.

on 2020-02-10   OBJECT

The proposed building would dominant the skyline, plans of the East Elevation showthat it dwarfs the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School and the adjacent building in Woodland, itis even taller than the Senate House building. It would completely change the character of thisarea which is as noted a suburban area of high quality tree-lined streets and large detached villas.

In this setting the building is too large and its appearance is unsuitable being of contrastingcharacter to the Grade II listed Bristol Grammar School, and the old Baptist college, together withthe rest of Woodland Road in a northerly direction.A smaller building of similar style would bemore acceptable.

It should also be noted that whilst Hawthorns has undergone undesirable alterations, these arerelatively minor. It is a landmark, which fits its surrounding unlike the proposed building.Hawthorns is also a building of considerable age being built in 1888, as four separate villas.

on 2020-02-10   SUPPORT

I am delighted that the public realm is going to be improved, and that the much-neededfacilities at one of our world class universities are being made available for the public. Especiallythe special collections. Integrating the university as part of the local community and vice versaincreases understanding and allows us all to benefit. The development can only enhance our cityand its culture, so we continue to be a vibrant city where people want to study, research and stay.

on 2020-02-10   SUPPORT

I am delighted that the public realm is going to be improved, and that the much-neededfacilities at one of our world class universities are being made available for the public. Especiallythe special collections. Integrating the university as part of the local community and vice versaincreases understanding and allows us all to benefit. The development can only enhance our cityand its culture, so we continue to be a vibrant city where people want to study, research and stay.

on 2020-02-10   OBJECT

The demolition of the Hawthorns building would be a great architectural and historicalloss to the area. That and the proposed designs for the new building are extremely bland. Would itnot be at all possible to incorporate whole, or even part, of the existing Hawthorns building into thenew development?

on 2020-02-09   OBJECT

I strongly object to the University's proposals for the pedestrianisation of part ofWoodland Road and the reconfiguration of the traffic flow. As a resident of Kingsdown I stronglyobject to the University's plan for a "Clifton campus/Hub" like UWE as it has never been regardedas such. The number of students now is far in excess of what the area can support and I don't seewhy the community should suffer yet more change. The re-routing of traffic will mean that 3 of the4 routes westwards i.e. Tyndall Road, St Michael's park and Cotham Hill (already one way)towards Whiteladies road or the Triangle will be one way which will cause so much inconvenience.We have already endured traffic lights on Tyndall's Park Road for months and months not tomention the complete closure of St Michael's park. The University has appropriated our area bystealth, slowly buying up all the property. Many of the family homes in Kingsdown/Cotham havebeen bought for student housing with the result of inflated, unaffordable prices, lack of communityspirit, rubbish in the streets everywhere and sometimes unacceptably noisy parties.Parking is also a real issue as we will lose more parking places with the closure of WoodlandRoad which will push cars even more into the residential areas where there is already a problemdue to all the multiple-occupancy.The re-routing of the traffic is my main objection as it will mean a big detour if you are coming upWoodland Road from Park Row and can't turn right into Tyndall Ave.The arrogance of the University thinking it can just sequester a large part of our area is so gallingand the number of students is now unacceptable, whatever they may contribute to the localeconomy. Why could the University not just extend outwards to all boundaries and upwards on theexisting library? The huge, modern design for the library isn't even beautiful. It means more

modernist architecture is moving down the hill towards the Triangle amidst all the Victorianbuildings of the BG school.

on 2020-02-07   SUPPORT

This plan has been in the university's thinking for over 12 years. This imaginativebuilding will greatly enhance the environment around woodland road and provide a much morewelcoming focal point for staff, students and importantly the people of Bristol who will find an opendoorto learn more about their University.