Application Details

Reference 21/01999/F
Address Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol BS8 3HX  
Street View
Proposal Erection of 62 dwellings with associated parking, new vehicular access, and associated infrastructure and landscaping.
Validated 09-04-21
Type Full Planning
Status Pending decision
Neighbour Consultation Expiry 16-08-21
Standard Consultation Expiry 28-09-21
Determination Deadline 09-07-21
BCC Planning Portal BCC Planning Portal
Public Comments Supporters: 27 Objectors: 441  Unstated: 6  Total: 474
No. of Page Views 0
Comment analysis   Date of Submission
Nearby Trees Within 200m

BTF response: OBJECT

Recommendation submitted 11-06-21

We have submitted our objections - HERE

Public Comments

Bristol Tree Forum  OBJECT

2

Background

There are 24 trees growing on this 0.53-hectare site1. The tree survey produced by the applicant

in support of its application2 shows that the trees provide 0.29 hectares of canopy cover. This

represents 54.7% of the site.

Even though the site is a car park, the trees growing within it are a diverse and unusual

collection of species. Of the 24 trees surveyed, two – T02, a Himalayan Birch and T05, a

Wellingtonia - have been categorised as A1,2 under BS5837:2012 and so are very high-quality

trees. T05 will be retained, but T02 has been identified for removal. Of the remaining trees,

15 are categorised as B2 (9 to be removed) and 6 are category C2 (5 to be removed). Only one

tree, a crab apple ‘in terminal decline’ (T16) is categorised as U. All the other trees have at

least 20 more years of ‘contribution’ remaining, with many having 40+ years of life before

them.

Of the 16 trees identified for removal, only T16, the crab apple in terminal decline is being

removed because of its condition. The remaining trees are being removed simply to facilitate

the development, i.e., because they are in the way of the current design ‘vision’. Our position

is that the proposal should be redesigned to retain the existing trees.

The application of the Mitigation Hierarchy

The Mitigation Hierarchy is an integral part of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).

It is a cascading decision process: only if the preceding choice is unavailable is the succeeding

option considered. This is the decision-making hierarchy:

1. Avoid - Where possible habitat damage should be avoided.

2. Minimise - Where possible habitat damage and loss should be minimised.

3. Remediate - Where possible any damage or lost habitat should be restored.

4. Compensate - As a last resort, damaged or lost habitat should be compensated.

The removal of any tree should not be undertaken unless it is shown to be unavoidable. Only

when habitat damage is unavoidable can the next two steps be considered.

The appellant has failed to demonstrate that its plans can only be realised if the trees it

identifies are removed. The presence of the trees is merely an inconvenience to its preferred

scheme and for no other reason. This is not enough to justify the removal of the trees growing

here.

1 https://bristoltrees.space/Tree/sitecode/Bristol_Zoo_SCarpark. 2 21_01999_F-ARBORICULTURAL_REPORT-2925089.pdf.

3

The impact of BTRS

The applicant has calculated that 28 trees3 will need to be planted to replace the trees lost as

the result of the proposed development, in accordance with BCS9: Green Infrastructure - Bristol

Tree Replacement Standard (BTRS)4. Whilst not expressly stated, the plans published suggest

that seven of these 28 replacement trees will be planted on the site.

Tree Preservation Orders needed

Many of the trees on the site are important enough to deserve Tree Preservation Orders. At the

very least, the Himalayan Birch (T02), the Wellingtonia (T05), the Deodar/Atlas Cedar (T06)

and the Bhutan/Weymouth Pine (T07) should be so protected. These trees are significant

specimens, they form part of the nearby Bristol Zoo Gardens tree collection, are prominent and

provide significant visual amenity from the public realm.

Figure 1: The Wellingtonia (T05), the Deodar/Atlas Cedar (T06) and the Bhutan/Weymouth Pine (T07) as seen from Cecil Road.

3 We have calculated the figure as 25 replacements but are happy to accept the applicant’s figure. 4 https://www.bristol.gov.uk/planning-and-building-regulations/supplementary-planning-documents.

4

Biodiversity Net Gain

The applicant has produced an ecological survey5 but no biodiversity metric calculation to value

the current habitat of the site.

Using Biodiversity Metric 2.0,6 we calculate that the trees on the site provide 1.40 baseline

habitat units (HU). This is on the basis that these trees are categorised as Urban - Street Tree

with low distinctiveness, moderate condition, medium ecological connectivity and in a location

ecologically desirable but not in the local strategy. Under these proposals 0.10 HU will be lost.

If a 10% Net Gain is allowed for as proposed by the current draft of the Environment Bill 2020,

then 0.24 HUs (equivalent to 1,298 square metres of new tree canopy) will need to be created

to replace the habitat lost as a result of this proposal. We calculate that this would require 36

Select Standard trees to be planted now to replace the canopy lost after 27 years have elapsed.7

Here is a summary of our calculations:

Biodiversity Net Gain (BNG) Summary

Site Area

Ha Tree Canopy Cover m^2 Ha % TCC8 HUs9

Baseline Tree Habitat 2,901 0.29 54.7% 1.40

0.53

Baseline Tree Habitat Retained

2,701 0.27 93.1% 1.31

Baseline Tree Habitat Lost

200 0.02 6.9% 0.10

Add 10% Net Gain 290 0.029 10.0% 0.14

Biodiversity Net Gain Habitat Added 1,298 0.13 44.7% 0.24

Tree Replacement Equivalent - Select Standard trees with a stem diameter of 35 mm are planted which

will each reach optimum canopy size in - 27 years 36

Potential impact on Bristol Zoo Gardens

This car park is an integral part of the Bristol Zoo Gardens. This application should not be

5 21_01999_F-ECOLOGICAL_REPORT-2925088.pdf. 6 http://publications.naturalengland.org.uk/publication/5850908674228224. 7 This is the Time-to-target period set for trees categorised as Urban - Street Tree. 8 Tree Canopy Cover. 9 Habitat Units.

5

decided separately from any decision about the zoo’s long-term future, given that the zoo

gardens will soon be closing.

We are concerned that this application is premature as it pre-empts, and is likely to limit, any

decision about the long-term future of the Bristol Zoo Gardens site (and the trees growing on

it) which may require parking to be made available, especially given the recent undertaking by

the Council and the Downs Committee not to allow parking on the Downs for non-Downs related

purposes once the zoo has closed.

Bristol Tree Forum

11 June 2021

Dear Sirs,

We hote that there is still no Biodiversity Metric calculation published. Why is this? If one has been submitted, may we please have a copy of the macro-enabled .xlsm calculation please.

In light of the substantive changes to the planning proposals, will a new calculation using Biodiversity Metic 3.0 now be undertaken?

Best regards

Mark CD AshdownChair - Bristol Tree Forum

  44 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-10-15   OBJECT

Ms chrystel remillat  FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR FLAT 8 COTHAM PARK BRISTOL  on 2021-09-20   OBJECT

Dear Sir,

I would like to object fully to this proposal on the following ground:

1) The density of this development is extraordinary and certainly not in keeping with the rest of thesurrounding dwellings.

2) The College road site in particular is overdeveloped. It seems the view has been to put as manydwellings as possible on the site with no regard to whether this is adequate or not for thesurrounding area. The design of this block is oppressive, sitting almost right on the street insteadof being set back.It looks like an ugly bunker which dwarves the neighbouring properties, being higher than they are.

3) The proposed design for the mews houses is even more atrocious than the block looking onCollege road. It is lazy and unimaginative, a generic set of cubes, using generic and inappropriatematerial which would be an eyesore for this conservation area.

4) The loss of a very significant number of mature trees is unacceptable and cannot be mitigatedby planting others.

5) Paragraph 197 Section 16 of the National Policy Framework states that plans should enhancethe significance of heritage assets. This proposal as it stands is completely inadequate from thatperspective and would be detrimental to this beautiful conservation area and to the neighbouringlisted buildings.

Ruth Slinn  AUBURN HOUSE   on 2021-09-19   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,

We wish to bring to your attention the poor advice from the Bristol Planning Department for Councillors to accept their current recommendation to accept the proposed plans to develop the west car park No. 21/011999/F

The report summary and recommendations are out of proportion to that of local opposition to the scheme. Part of at least one listed property will inevitably be damaged should the scheme been accepted. The Planning Department have been informed and chosen to ignore this.

The Planning Department have also ignored the overall impact on the Conservation Area Item 1 9.14

Item 1 7.4 APPLICANTS response to comments from neighbours with adjoining properties was inadequate.

Item 1 7.4 Consultation was inadequate with no reported indication of the proportion of local descent and opposition.

Item 1 3.4 and 6.1The land of present car park was covenanted to the Zoo by owners of the villas in Clifton Down for the use of the Zoo solely for horticulture purposes. It has never been used for housing, industry or commerce. Its use as a car park was tolerated by planning only on condition of extra landscaping with trees, which are now to be felled.

The comments form HISTORIC ENGLAND Item 1 7.6 7.7 and 7.8 all of which have a negative impact on the proposal and do not advise support for the proposed scheme.

The comments from the CONSERVATION ADVISORY PANEL Item 1 7.8 concludes that the proposed scheme does not accord with NPPF and there are insufficient public benefits for the plans to be accepted.

Bristol waste are yet to receive adequate details but happy for further consultation.

Transport and Parking are further potential problems.

Item 7.12 The revised plan to set back buildings 1m in College Road considered to be inadequate June 24th 2021. But as yet not revised or changed.

We consider that even the revised proposals are unacceptable in every way. Hoping that integrity will outweigh political expediency, especially in the light of dubious assumptions made about drainage, heating, and ge convenience of the site in relation to transport in general, during construction and subsequently. We trust that all councillors will read the report in detail and refuse to accept the Planning Department's recommendation to give permission for such an unsuitable housing estate in Clifton.

In addition the local facilities are inadequate for social housing clients. ie Only one overcrowded primary school, no NHS dentist, already busy GP practice, no cut price super market in Clifton nearest Crow Lane!!!!!!

Thank you for your attention Ruth Slinn.

Mrs Helen Thornhill  FLAT 4, 7 PERCIVAL ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-09-12   OBJECT

I would like to object in the strongest possible terms to this application to build acrowded housing complex on a unique and special site. Please, please use this opportunity tobuild something quite different considering the environment that we are all trying to improve andthe immediate environment that this appalling mass of housing will ruin. Can we have someimagination and real care shown to present and future residents.

Susie Lincoln  5 NORLAND ROAD   on 2021-09-10   OBJECT

Sir/madamI most definitely object to the proposed development plan of this site. Reasons are;Destruction of the old walls surrounding the site.No recycling of old materials.Lack of variety of use.(everything now turned to housing no matter what it was before hand ) Increasing traffic volume in a highly built up area. Increase of building in a sensitive area(the downs ) Over use of a site , too many dwellings . Lack of imagination in a unique "one off" opportunity to create something really innovative. Please refuse permission to anything that does not take any of the above into consideration. Susie k lincoln Clifton resident and Bristolian .

Mr Rosie Quick  15 EATON CRESCENT BRISTOL  on 2021-08-26   OBJECT

This won't be in keeping with any of the surrounding area, and is not sustainableenough. It's 2021 a lot more effort should be put into sustainability, this is purely being built forprofit above people and the planet.

Mr Richard Markham  1 GUTHRIE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-19   OBJECT

Since our initial lodged objection, some very minor changes have been subjected by thedevelopers. In no way do they address our original objections concerning the monolithic frontageof the proposed flats facing College Road, their height, and the lack of any attempt to tie in orcompliment the surrounding architecture. The long frontage is unbroken unlike the currententrances to this area from College Road.No attempt is made to solve the inevitable lack of parking space or excessive density of theproposed dwellings.Like the nearby WHSmith development, it looks as though the development tactic is to makeminimal changes so that resistance by concerned parties is eventually worn down and a long termdevelopment, undesirable for Clifton and the city of Bristol, goes through.

Mr Matthew Barwick-Barrett  6 OAKFIELD PLACE BRISTOL  on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

As the Zoo's latest planning application is virtually the same as the original, with onlyminor changes, my original objection still stands.

Seriously this is just property developers looking to make as much money as possible by stickingup as many properties as possible in the centre of our city. This is so far from what the people ofBristol want or need!

Mr Jawad Shalash  SUTTON HOUSE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

21/01999/F: Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol BS8 3HXAmended Plans - Heritage Assessment

Further to our representations submitted yesterday, my wife and I have sought the advice ofGregory Beale of Planning Heritage who has provided the following critique of the proposedadjustments to the submitted application and I particular the Heritage Assessment Addendum.

'Reducing the roofline of one building, hipping a roof and retaining a boundary wall to the height ofc1m (it is currently approx. 2-2.5m high) does not constitute considered revisions to a scheme thatis blatantly seeking to maximise value rather than create sympathetic development which blendsand compliments the aesthetics of the locality.

In terms of the assessment of what constitutes harm, it is flawed: The scheme does not amount toimprovements to the current aesthetic of the Site, and its better integration into the local historicenvironment 'experience' .

The revisions to the design are minimal and focussed entirely upon the frontage to College Roadand avoids any modification or reduction in the density, scale or massing of development withinthe site. The 'adjustments' fail to take on board the fundamental concerns that the scheme raiseswith regard to the density, impact upon the setting of the Listed Buildings and the detriment to thecharacter and appearance of the Conservation Area.

The design of the College Road element is described as having been strongly influenced by theadjacent Victorian 40-48 College Road, whilst clearly identifiable as current, and not comprising

pastiche. This is a bold statement when the design bears no relationship to the existing terrace.The concern is that it

- Does not respect the mass or scale of the terrace;- Introduces elements such as full height windows, sedum roofs, cladding, balconies/verandasetc., none of which are seen on the terrace;- Is utilitarian and reflective of a standardised approach to apartment block development;- Fundamentally fails to respond to the context of the location.

The claim that the historic wall is being retained is derisory. The existing wall, which forms animportant visually strong feature on College Road, is to be reduced to a low plinth.

The Council recognise the importance and contribution of boundary walls to the character andappearance of boundary wall especially front walls within Conservation Areas and state in theirConservation Area Character Assessment that the demolition of traditional boundary walls andmeans of enclosure will be resisted: The proposed alterations to the wall will be detrimental to thecharacter of the Conservation Area and result in substantial harm to what is a non-designatedheritage asset.

On the matter of non-designated heritage assets, the addendum claims that the demolition of theformer coach house will result in enhancement of the site, failing to assess the importance of thisbuilding or indeed to the adjacent walls, and therefore does not state what level harm this may be.

The coach house is a building of significance revealing the historic association between the siteand the listed buildings on Clifton Down. It is a historic link to when the gardens of those propertiesextended across the site. The level of harm is substantial harm (NPPF 207).

In assessing the impact of the development upon views, the argument that the development willcause less than substantial harm is equally false. The proposed development will not 'channel'views but will in fact remove views in all directions;

- From Clifton Down towards the south and the villas on Cecil Road;- Across the site from College Fields and Cecil Road to the zoo and the pavilion.

These views, which allow for an understanding the open and verdant character of the conservationarea, will be lost.

In terms of the impact upon the setting of the listed buildings, the development will causesubstantial loss/harm. Setting is defined as the surrounding in which a heritage asset isexperienced. The setting may, as stated in the NPPF;

'make a positive or negative contribution to the significance of an asset, may affect the ability to

appreciate that significance or may be neutral. The significance is the value of a heritage asset tothis and future generations because of its heritage interest. That interest may be archaeological,architectural, artistic or historic. Significance derives not only from a heritage asset's physicalpresence, but also from its setting...'

The assessment carried out by the applicants heritage consultants;

- Fails to assess the impact of the change;- Focuses appears simply on a visual connection and an assessment of the proposal's impactupon it;- Set to one side the historic, social and economic connections between the site and the adjacenthomes and other properties;- Does not consider the historical factors which can be enough on their own to bring a site withinthe setting of a listed building, as is the case with the villas of Clifton Down: A visual connection isnot necessary in every case, although in this case there is a strong visual connection.

Although setting of a listed building is a concept recognised by statute, it is not statutorily defined,nor does it lend itself to precise definition (see R. (on the application of Williams) v Powys CountyCouncil [2017] EWCA Civ 427, at paragraphs 53 to 58).

However, implicit in section 66 of the Listed Buildings Act is that the setting of a listed building iscapable of being affected in some discernible way by development, whether within the setting oroutside it.

Identifying the extent of the setting for the purposes of a planning decision is a matter of fact andplanning judgment for the decision-maker. In this case, the application is clearly within the settingof the listed building, and it proposes the land that has a well-documented historic connection to allthe properties on Clifton Down.

In assessing the development an assessment must include other factors beyond the visual andphysical, including but not limited to, economic, social and historical. These other considerationsmay include for example, the historic relationship between places.

In this regard, the setting which the listed buildings on Clifton Down are experienced includes theapplication site with which there is a strong historical relationship. Equally, the site contributes tothe character and appearance of the conservation area and forms one part of the manyestablished open 'blocks' within the Character Area, all of which contribute to the special interestof the conservation area.

The impact upon the setting of the listed buildings it is not just the direct impact the developmentwill have upon views across the site, it is the impact upon the visual relationship between theapplication site and those heritage assets. It is accepted the setting of those listed buildings has

changed over time, albeit quite modestly, however the historical relationship has continued as aresult of the site remaining open and has not been intruded upon by inappropriate developmentwhich rises above the boundary walls that screen the car park and the former grounds of the listedbuildings.

In assessing the setting of the listed buildings, the area of former gardens contribute to thehistorical, cultural and visual understanding of that setting and establish the extent of theimmediate setting of the properties. In this regard, there would be substantial harm to the setting ofthe villas on Clifton Down from development within it.

The heritage statement fails to consider these issues and advocates the development will enhancethe appearance of the site. This is not the case. The proposed development will impinge upon anderode the setting of the listed buildings and comprise the character and appearance of theconservation area In this regard the level of harm must be viewed as substantial.

I conclude that the development will cause substantial harm to heritage assets, including bycausing harm the setting of the listed buildings, harm to the character of the Clifton ConservationArea and harm to the non listed heritage assets of the former rear garden wall of the listed Villasfronting College Road and the only remaining former coach house of the listed Villas.'

We had hoped that, following the submission of our previous representations the applicants wouldhave given full consideration to the impact of the proposed development upon the heritage assets.Unfortunately, this is not the case.

It is clear from the above that the applicants have not correctly assessed the impact of thedevelopment upon the heritage assets, wrongly concluding that the impact of development whichwould dominate the setting of listed buildings, block important views across the conservation area,fundamentally alter the character of the conservation area and result in the demolition of importantnon listed heritage assets, would either be of low significance, no significance at all or animprovement.

Gregory Beales critique of the submitted and amended Heritage Assessment, and his own view asa Heritage professional of considerable experience, is that the development will cause significantharm.

This leads to the conclusion that the application for planning permission should be refused due tothe significant harm development would cause to heritage assets.

Thank you for taking into account these further comments.

Kind regards,

Mr & Mrs Shalash

Patricia Cook  40 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

I have already made my objections to the previous planning proposal and your new one is not very different.

All my original reasons for objecting still stand and I am objecting once again.

Your plans are inappropriate to such a special area of Bristol. The site will be congested, there are still too many houses even though the number is slightly reduced, parking provision has not been thought about, mature trees will be a huge amenity loss as trees are so much a part of this beautiful area and the entrance next to our property which is on the corner of College and Cecil roads will be too close causing pollution of both air and sound. The entrance needs to be moved to give more space for turning and to avoid congestion dangerous to pedestrians as well as other road users.

This proposal needs a major re-think as it will severely damage the health both mental and physical of the present residents of this area and be an irreversible deterioration to the amenities of Bristol.

We had bought the garden flat in our building with a view to retiring there in due course. You are causing us to revise our plans which have been twenty years in the making. The effect on many peoples' lives will be devastating.

Patricia Cook

Maxine Leung  5A NORTHCOTE ROAD   on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

Please note my previous objections to the proposed housing development sill stand.

Maxine Leung

  4 WINDSOR TERRACE   on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

  12 REDLAND GREEN ROAD   on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

  23 KINGFISHER DRIVE   on 2021-08-17   OBJECT

Miss Emma Howgill  FLAT 9, 40 COLLEGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The alteration to reduce the proposed apartment block by one storey mitigates slightlythe overdevelopment of this site but does nothing to mitigate the other flaws of the development.There is no proposed alteration to the number of car parking spaces, still leaving the proposeddevelopment with an additionally huge number of cars in the area, adding to traffic and pollutionconcerns. Nor do the alterations change the proposed access road which will cause additional andsignificant pollution and noise directly underneath or beside the living quarters of most of thearea's existing residents - and this means the pollution from those fifty cars flowing into ourbedrooms and living rooms. Nor does it change the danger of the location of this proposed accessroute - there is insufficient clearance on Cecil Street and insufficient distance from the intersectionwith College Road, particularly in bad weather, to safely allow heavy traffic to turn into and out ofthis new access road safely and there is no concern over heavy traffic, rubbish collection ordelivery vans which will be significantly larger than normal domestic vehicles and which will still beusing this access route and its accompanying tight turn into the new site.Nor has there been any attempt to remedy the inequity in amenities (privacy, access to openspace etc) between both existing and new residents and between new residents. The zoo, as amajor conservation institution should be promoting a design that encourages ecological andconservation values. At the same time, the past year has shown us the importance of communityand access to open space and this development, as currently planned, shows that access to openspace is apparently a right based on income - only those who can afford a ground floor flat or oneof the houses on the site have the right to open space. By thinking differently, it could be possibleto change the layout of the site to include a communal garden, allowing both for ecologicalplanting, encouragement of small amphibians, reptiles and mammals that cannot beaccommodated in household gardens, but also providing much needing communal space thatcould encourage a sense of community between not only the new residents of the area but also

between new and existing residents, rather than enmity caused by the inequality promoted bythese designs and the sense of loss to existing residents of privacy, quiet and community to bereplaced by traffic and pollution and a poorly planned, insensitively designed residentialdevelopment.

Mrs catherine wyse  14 OLD SCHOOL LANE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

This application is a very slight variation on the previous one and it remains completelyat odds with the local environment.It is high density housing out of sync with the local style and fails to preserve the character of theconservation area as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The development facing onto College Road is higher than the existing properties and the groundfloor flats all face directly onto the road and the building is not set back from the road in keeping.There is inadequate parking associated with the development and will adversely impact thesurrounding area.I believe the development is totally unsuitable and will have a detrimental impact to theConservation Area.

Mrs Deirdre Hardwick  KEEDS WOOD COTTAGE KEEDS LANE LONG ASHTON  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Objections to the proposed scheme:The adjustments to the original scheme are insignificant.The proposal fails to preserve the character of the Conservation Area required by planning law.The buildings are too tall and are out of keeping with the surrounding buildings.Precious trees would be lost.Parking is inadequate.The scheme lacks the imagination needed for such an historic area of Bristol

Mrs Gillian Longman  4 PEMBROKE VALE BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Bristol Zoo's planned development of the West Car Park is detrimental to theConservation Area: it is over-intensive in breadth as well as in height, inappropriate in design andundermines the special quality of the surrounding architecture. Please reject this application.

Dr Rebecca Slinn  AUBURN HOUSE, CLIFTON DOWN 0 BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

I made a detailed objection when the first application was made and so I will not repeatit all here. The changes made are really very minor and do not address the key issues.

In particular I remain concerned about the high density of housing. I now have information kindlyprovided by CHIS which shows clearly that the density is way higher than most other areas inBristol let alone Clifton conservation area. The number of flats that would reflect current densitywould be about 28 so considerably less than half that suggested.

The area is said to be previously developed, this has only been latterly with a car park - nobuildings and the adjacent walls were untouched. Prior to that it was green houses and used forhorticulture. It is a not at all clear that it can be considered a brown field site in which case theargument for any sort of development starts from a very different place. Could the council pleasedemonstrate clearly how they have considered and resolved this issue.

Unfortunately the latest application still very much fails to protect the character of the conservationarea in layout , design and density of dwellings. It is my understanding that this is required by law.

There are successful examples in Clifton e.g. 46 and 48 Canygne Road which are of a scale andstyle that suits the area. This sort of approach would be much better and would seem to requirethe zoo and it's architects to go straight back to the drawing board and start again.

Unfortunately this development seems to be about squeezing the maximum number of smalldwellings into the area as possible with little regard for the future or existing residents of the area.

I am a supporter of the wider goals of the zoo , but unfortunately feel that the desire to raise fundshas blinded the trustees to the environmental damage they are attempting to create on their owndoorstep.

Mr Glyn Thompson  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The applicant's recently submitted minor amendments make no real difference to thedesign or scale of this application. I continue to object most strongly to the application for the samereasons as previously:

1. Our property backs directly onto the development site and if the development was built, ourquality of life would be adversely affected. Our courtyard garden currently is very quiet, is notoverlooked and has clean air. The proposed new access road would run along the rear boundry ofour small garden, a few feet from where we sit in summer. Our outdoor space would be badlypolluted by the sound and exhaust fumes from the vehicles accessing and making deliveries to theproposed 65 dwellings. Furthermore, our privacy would be taken away as our garden and kitchenwould be overlooked from the upper units in Block B.

2. Considering the scheme as a whole, I consider that it constitutes over intensive development, isof very poor design and is not appropriate for such a special, sensitive and historic location.

3. The number of new dwellings proposed is excessive. 62 is too many for the site and thatnumber would generate traffic and parking issues for the neighbourhood. The parking provision onsite is wholly inadequate.

4. The proposed new access from Cecil Road is ill conceived. The existing access from CollegeRoad should be used to service the development as it is existing and has a good safety record.

5. All the buildings are too tall and Block A is an ugly block of flats without any architectural merit.It is completely incongruous to its surroundings.

6. The development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

7. The proposed loss of 15 mature trees is unacceptable.

Mr Glyn Thompson  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The applicant's recently submitted minor amendments make no real difference to thedesign or scale of this application. I continue to object most strongly to the application for the samereasons as previously:

1. Our property backs directly onto the development site and if the development was built, ourquality of life would be adversely affected. Our courtyard garden currently is very quiet, is notoverlooked and has clean air. The proposed new access road would run along the rear boundry ofour small garden, a few feet from where we sit in summer. Our outdoor space would be badlypolluted by the sound and exhaust fumes from the vehicles accessing and making deliveries to theproposed 65 dwellings. Furthermore, our privacy would be taken away as our garden and kitchenwould be overlooked from the upper units in Block B.

2. Considering the scheme as a whole, I consider that it constitutes over intensive development, isof very poor design and is not appropriate for such a special, sensitive and historic location.

3. The number of new dwellings proposed is excessive. 62 is too many for the site and thatnumber would generate traffic and parking issues for the neighbourhood. The parking provision onsite is wholly inadequate.

4. The proposed new access from Cecil Road is ill conceived. The existing access from CollegeRoad should be used to service the development as it is existing and has a good safety record.

5. All the buildings are too tall and Block A is an ugly block of flats without any architectural merit.It is completely incongruous to its surroundings.

6. The development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

7. The proposed loss of 15 mature trees is unacceptable.

Mr Glyn Thompson  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The applicant's recently submitted minor amendments make no real difference to thedesign or scale of this application. I continue to object most strongly to the application for the samereasons as previously:

1. Our property backs directly onto the development site and if the development was built, ourquality of life would be adversely affected. Our courtyard garden currently is very quiet, is notoverlooked and has clean air. The proposed new access road would run along the rear boundry ofour small garden, a few feet from where we sit in summer. Our outdoor space would be badlypolluted by the sound and exhaust fumes from the vehicles accessing and making deliveries to theproposed 65 dwellings. Furthermore, our privacy would be taken away as our garden and kitchenwould be overlooked from the upper units in Block B.

2. Considering the scheme as a whole, I consider that it constitutes over intensive development, isof very poor design and is not appropriate for such a special, sensitive and historic location.

3. The number of new dwellings proposed is excessive. 62 is too many for the site and thatnumber would generate traffic and parking issues for the neighbourhood. The parking provision onsite is wholly inadequate.

4. The proposed new access from Cecil Road is ill conceived. The existing access from CollegeRoad should be used to service the development as it is existing and has a good safety record.

5. All the buildings are too tall and Block A is an ugly block of flats without any architectural merit.It is completely incongruous to its surroundings.

6. The development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

7. The proposed loss of 15 mature trees is unacceptable.

  THE SHRUBBERY FRENCHAY HILL   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Ms Sally-Ann Pound  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The minor amendments the Zoo have made to their planning application areinsignificant and I continue to object to this planning application because:

1. Our currently peaceful small garden would be polluted by the noise and fumes from carspassing a few feet away from where we sit.

2. Our garden and rear living area would be overlooked by the occupiers of the upper floors inBlock B and our privacy lost.

3. The conservation area would not be preserved or enhanced by the over intensive developmentthat is proposed.

4. There are too many dwellings proposed for the site and the buildings are too tall.

5. There are not enough parking spaces within the scheme which will cause parking issues on theadjacent streets.

6. The overall design is poor and not appropriate for the area.

7. The access should be from College Road and not Cecil Road.

8. Block A on College Road is ugly, oversized and looks like a city centre block of flats.

9. 15 lovely trees would be lost

Ms Sally-Ann Pound  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The minor amendments the Zoo have made to their planning application areinsignificant and I continue to object to this planning application because:

1. Our currently peaceful small garden would be polluted by the noise and fumes from carspassing a few feet away from where we sit.

2. Our garden and rear living area would be overlooked by the occupiers of the upper floors inBlock B and our privacy lost.

3. The conservation area would not be preserved or enhanced by the over intensive developmentthat is proposed.

4. There are too many dwellings proposed for the site and the buildings are too tall.

5. There are not enough parking spaces within the scheme which will cause parking issues on theadjacent streets.

6. The overall design is poor and not appropriate for the area.

7. The access should be from College Road and not Cecil Road.

8. Block A on College Road is ugly, oversized and looks like a city centre block of flats.

9. 15 lovely trees would be lost

Dr Allan Brewer  49, CANYNGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The applicants have made a small concession in the amended application, generally inthe right direction. They probably cynically always intended to do this - since the originalapplication was ridiculously out of line with Clifton architecture and housing density.I object to the amended proposal since it is still incompatible with the architecture of thesurrounding conservation area, and far too densely housed to incorporate sympathetically. Thereare good examples of new residential buildings in the immediate area (e.g. 46/48 Canynge Road)which fit in without discord. I trust also that this application will not be looked upon favourablysimply because it is being made on behalf of the zoo.

Mr Adam Sisman  2 CANYNGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

I strongly object to this revised planning application, for much the same reasons as Iobjected to the original application. It seems to me an overdevelopment in a sensitive location, andin its scale and in its details completely out of character with the Clifton Conservation Area.

Mr Jawad Shalash  SUTTON HOUSE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

21/01999/F: Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol BS8 3HXAmended Plans

My wife and I have studied the amended plans submitted to the Council and wish to maintain ourobjection to the proposed development for the reasons set out in our previous submission dated2nd June 2021.

The amended plans seem to illustrate a very slight amendment to Block A, reducing a smallsection of the northern elevation fronting College Road to four rather than five storey height, andproposes the retention of stone piers forming a very small part of the historic rear garden wall ofthe listed Villas that still fronts onto College Road.

It is very disappointing to us and our neighbours that the tiny amendments proposed do notaddress our detailed representations one iota.

The Zoo seems to have again totally disregarded views from residents and have disregarded ormisrepresented the impact of the proposed development upon the heritage assets that are soimportant to the character of the conservation area, the setting of the listed buildings and thecharacter of this part of Clifton as a whole.

Beautiful Development instead of Carbuncles

The revised National Planning Policy Framework introduces the term 'beautiful', advising thatensuring beautiful well designed places is a social objective of sustainability. Paragraph 126

further advises that;

'126. The creation of high quality, beautiful and sustainable buildings and places is fundamental towhat the planning and development process should achieve. Good design is a key aspect ofsustainable development, creates better places in which to live and work and helps makedevelopment acceptable to communities.'

The development proposed is directly contrary to the above because it removes two beautiful andimportant heritage assets, being the historic wall fronting College Road and the former coachhouse within the site, and proposes to replace them with 3, 4 and 5 storey carbuncles: NPPF wasamended precisely to give Councils the power to stop such ugly and inappropriate development.

Heritage Addendum

We are concerned that the Heritage Statement has not been amended to take into account therepresentations we have made in relation to the importance of the heritage assets, the need toretain the former garden wall, the need to retain the former coach house and the need to respectthe setting of the listed buildings in design, scale and proximity of development.

We refer particularly to the revised assessment of affects; which presents a wholly inappropriateview of the impact upon the heritage assets. We are very concerned that;

1. The harm to the conservation area is assessed as being on the lower end of less thansubstantial: The fact that an area that has remained essentially open since first developed, usedeither as garden or car park throughout its history and offers important views of heritage assetsacross the conservation area is totally ignored. Blocking these views entirely by erecting amassive block that will be the tallest building in the area will have a significant impact;

2. The harm to the setting of the listed buildings is also assessed as being at the lower end of lessthan substantial harm. This is again not credible: The listed buildings are currently the largestbuildings in the vicinity that are identified as being important assets in the Conservation Areacharacter assessment but will in future be dominated by a massive block of flats and 3 storey townhouses in very close proximity to them. The City Council has previously concluded that a twostorey home far further from the heritage assets would cause substantial harm and can onlyconclude that the proposed development will cause even greater harm;

3. The harm to the non-heritage assets is also considered to be low or an enhancement: Themajority of the former rear garden wall fronting onto College Road is to be demolished as is theformer coach house. How can the impact of demolishing important heritage assets be describedas being a low impact or even enhancing the area? The impact will again be significant;

4. The assessment also concludes that erecting rather ugly and massive modern buildings that

show no respect to the character of the area or setting of the listed buildings in an improvement.The site cannot be seen from the surrounding area due to the beautiful high stone walls, with onlythe trees being visible, giving the public impression of an open setting garden as it has alwaysbeen. To describe the impact of replacing an open area with 5 storeys of development as being animprovement lacks credibility and illustrates that the Heritage Addendum should be disregarded inits entirety.

Harm Caused by the Development

We remain of the view that the proposed development will cause substantial harm and requestthat the Council refuses the above application for the following reasons;

1. Impact on Residential Amenity - Significant loss of privacy;2. Impact on Residential Amenity - Overbearing development;3. Impact on Residential Amenity - Harm to outlook;4. Scale of Development - Over intensive development;5. Proximity to Listed Buildings - Harm to setting of listed buildings;6. Highway Layout - Inappropriate form of development no respecting character of the area;7. Conservation Area - Significant harm to the character of the Clifton Conservation Area;8. Loss of Heritage Assets - Including former coach house and a massive section of wall that hasexisted since the area was first developed;9. Loss of Open Space - The loss of the open space across the site that contributes significantlytowards the character of the area;10. Quality of Design - The proposed buildings are far from being beautiful;11. Conflict with policies of the development plan and the Framework.

Conclusion

We again request the Authority refuses the application for planning permission for all of thereasons given above.

We also again confirm that we would not oppose an appropriate form and scale of developmentthat retains and protects heritage assets, protects views across, into and out of the site to thebenefit of the conservation area and does not harm the setting of the listed buildings, the characterof the conservation area or residential amenity.

We thank you for taking these views into account.

Kind Regards

Dr Matt Blay  103 PEMBROKE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

I still object to this proposal, the revision does very little to address the totallyinappropriate nature of the development. The developers should be going back to the start todesign something that is suited to the area and the site.

Mr Anthony Harris  1 NORLAND ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The revised plans only pay lip service to the objections previously raised. Thedevelopment remains over intensive and totally out of character with the neighbourhood and theConservation Area principles. I do support the Zoo's conservation activities but expect them tosupport local conservation too !! I am sure here is a much more acceptable solution providing thedevelopment reduces it's intensity and takes note of the many objections from neighbours. It is nocoincidence that the vast majority of the supporters do not live in Clifton.

I repeat the same objections I made previously as follows:

Comment:I wish to strenuously object to this proposed development on the following grounds:

1. Not in keeping with the character of the surrounding buildings nor with the whole conservationarea.

2. The buildings are too tall.3. The development is significantly over-intensive4. There is inadequate amenity space5. Unnecessary loss of mature and attractive trees.6. Inadequate parking facilities

Dr Ian Leslie  COLLINGWOOD EASTER COMPTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

My Consulting rooms are in Clifton. I am frequently in the area of the planneddevelopment. Te new proposal makes no difference to my opinion.I object to the application proceeding for the following reasons.1. The area should be considered a park and not be used for development.. It is not developedland and is home to several mature trees that are irreplacable. In this era of Climate change, theCouncil should be making every endeavour to maintain all treesAND NOT BE PARTY TOFELLING TREES.2 The architecture of the proposed building is totally out of keeping with the area and will be astark contrast when anyone drives past. It will draw detrimental comment from any passerby.Tourists to Bristol will regard this as planning in poor taste. A modern building sticking out on thepavement will be such a hideous sight for the next century, if it lasts that long. The elegantarchitecture of the whole area will be dominated by this modern "clever" building.3. If the Council approve, they will leave behind an ugly legacy which history will severely criticise.

Mrs Kate Holland-Smith  4 HAILSTONE COTTAGES BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

As very little appears to have changed in the revised plans, my original objection stands- as follows:

- The proposed buildings along College Road are too tall and the design is out of keeping withsurrounding buildings.- The inappropriate design and overbearing size would damage the settings of surrounding listedbuildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.- The proposed parking provision is inadequate. Most households will have 1-2 cars to park even ifthey walk, cycle or take public transport to work. The need for visitor parking and the pressure thatthis will put on the surrounding on street parking also needs to be acknowledged and addressed.The surrounding on street parking is at capacity at certain times of the day as it is, and with thefuture development of the main zoo site (and any possible parking pressures resulting from this)still to be decided, these proposals should not put any additional pressure on the local on streetparking.- The proposed vehicular access provided is totally inadequate. Having just a single entrance andexit would cause congestion at peak times of the day and cause issues for existing local residentstrying to use their driveways. Changes to the design of the proposed buildings along CollegeRoad, for example to keep the existing vehicular access there, could assist with this.- Amenity space and children's play space is lacking in the design.- It appears that 15 mature trees will be lost the proposals do not address the need to compensatefor this.- The proposals constitute over-intensive development in what is a Conservation Area and fail topreserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim ofthis application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard

whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area orthe environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for theredevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Jeremy Holland-Smith  4 HAILSTONE COTTAGES BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

As the revised plans seem to be very similar to the original, my original objection stands- as follows:

Comment:I object to the proposals on the basis that:- The buildings are incongruous with the adjacent listed buildings and the rest of the area, being aConservation Area.- The proposed flats along College Road are too tall and the design does not compliment thesurrounding buildings. The density of development is too great in comparison with the rest of thelocal area.- The proposed parking and vehicular access provisions are inadequate.- The mature trees need to be protected (I understand that when planning permission for the sitepreviously changed from garden to carpark, landscaping and tree planting were importantconditions).

Ms Caroline Stent  WESTFIELD HOUSE 1 CECIL ROAD. CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Dear Mr Westbury

Please see my first objection to this Planning Application. My objections remain notwithstandingthe Zoo's very minor amendments to this wholly inappropriate scheme. It is quite clear that theZoo is not listening to the neighbourhood and is certainly not making any meaningful attempt tochange the proposed development into something appropriate for an important ConservationArea. These pathetic amendments only really illustrate how determined the Zoo is to foist an uglyoverdevelopment onto its neighbours.

The scheme represents over development, is poor quality in design and materials and whollyinappropriate for its location. I therefore rely on my previous objections since this amendment failsto address any of my concerns.

Caroline Stent

Ms Caroline Stent  WESTFIELD HOUSE 1 CECIL ROAD. CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Please add my name and address to my submitted objection

Caroline StentWestfield House1 Cecil RoadCliftonBristol. Bs8 3hr

Objection regarding application no 21/01/1999/fZoo Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol

Mr Stuart Lawson  WESTFIELD HOUSE 1 CECIL ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Regarding application number 21 01/1999/FZoo Former Car Park College Rd Clifton Bristol

Dear Mr Westbury

Regarding the Zoo's amended planning application for the car park site, I still object to theapplication. It is an insult to the local community in that the changes are so minor as to be of noconsequence. There has been no genuine attempt to improve the defective aspects ( of whichthere are many) and as a result there are no meaningful changes proposed. Therefore all mypreviously stated objections stand.

Despite the Zoo's claims to listen and engage with the neighbourhood, this grudging, minimalamendment simply serves to underline the contempt which the Zoo clearly feels for the area fromwhich it has profited over the years. The application is nothing more than a cynical exploitation of avaluable asset that belongs to the City and the people of Bristol - namely the Conservation Area.All the public relations guff in the world can't turn a substandard overdevelopment into somethingacceptable. The Zoo should be ashamed.

Please reject this scheme.

Stuart LawsonWestfield House1 Cecil RoadClifton BS8 3HR

Mr Robert Day  SECOND FLOOR FLAT 50 COLLEGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

As direct neighbours of Bristol Zoo, we continue to object to the proposed developmentof the West car park site in its revised form for the following main reasons:

Size and scale of Block A

Despite the small 'token' revisions to the plans submitted on 22 July 2021, the sheer scale of BlockA (in terms of both size and density) remains a significant concern for us as residents of 50College Road with the block to be constructed no more than 10-12 metres away from our property.Block A, even in its revised form, would still significantly dwarf all existing buildings at the northend of College Road and would set a worrying precedent for the development of the main zoo site.

The building design as currently proposed represents over-intensive development and would lookcompletely out of place in this leafy garden city area of Bristol, causing irreparable damage to thewider Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area by leaving behind a legacy which local residents willhave to endure for many years to come. The Heritage Addendum prepared by CotswoldArchaeology notes that the development would represent an enhancement to the ConservationArea as it "includes improvements to the current aesthetic of the Site, and its better integration intothe local historic environment 'experience'." In reality, this statement couldn't be further from thetruth for those of us directly overlooking the West car park site as the construction of a poorlydesigned five storey apartment block metres from our property would quite simply have theopposite effect!

Furthermore, the updated Daylight and Sunlight Assessment undertaken by Hydrock continues toshow the detrimental impact that a building the size of Block A would have on the quality of life

and privacy of those residing at 50 College Road with all rooms showing a reduction in daylight /sunlight and two rooms continuing to be below recommended limits, even with the minoramendments to Block A which frankly are so minimal in the grand scheme of the overalldevelopment that they would almost be considered derisory.

Lack of parking provision

The revised plans also do not address any of the concerns raised by local residents in relation tothe lack of parking which is disappointing as the provision of 45 parking spaces for 62 residencesis insufficient and will put undue strain on the availability of parking in the vicinity of the site.

For the reasons stated above we therefore continue to strongly oppose the development of theWest car park site in its current form and urge you to reject the application on these grounds. Asstated in our previous objection, we are not adverse to tasteful development of the site howeverour view is that to achieve this, Block A would need to be significantly reduced in height andbroken up at street level to be more in keeping with the surrounding area.

Mr William Reeve  COTE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

The proposed buildings would not benefit the existing residents. There are too manyunits for such a small area. The parking isn't practical. The outside space proposed is far too smallfor the well being of the residents. It's not eco friendly and there's little if nothing to indicate anyfuture plans for the area for electric cars or solar energy. Basically this application is about profitand has no interest for the existing residents or future of Clifton Village. The only individuals tobenefit from this proposal are the developers and zoo shareholders. This proposal is about moneyonly and there's no consideration for residents present or future. It's very disappointing this caneven be proposed let alone built.

  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  2 CLIFTON PARK ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

amenity, or the environment generally. It appears to be designed purely to reap the most profit from the piece of land.

j. Because this application may set a precedent for the development of the site of the main zoo, it is particularly important that this application is scrutinised carefully and the views of the public, especially local residents, are taken into account. The minor changes made in this revised application are an insult to the many local people who have objected and this application should be refused.

Paul Bartlett  4 THE AVENUE   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Dear Sir or Madam,I trust you will not mind this unconventional way of contacting you but I am currently on holiday.

I am concerned about the proposals to develop the West Zoo Car Park in Clifton. My main concern is the overintensive development, leading to increased traffic in College Road, Guthrie Road and the near surrounding streets where there are two schools. The traffic is already heavy, especially early mornings and late attentions. Parking provision would appear to be inadequate with frustrated residents attempting to park in adjoining streets, already full.

The character of the proposed structure would be too tall and out of keeping with the surrounding buildings.

The amenity spaces for the new residents would appear to be completely lacking. Perhaps more attention could be given to the provision of more green space including trees, shrubs and lawns.

I am mindful that Clfton is a unique suburb in the UK and indeed as some say the world. Our descendants would never forgive us if were to blight this precious corner.

Thank you for your valuable time and hope you will reject the proposal as it stands.

Yours faithfullyPaul Bartlett. M.A.

Dr Pamela Trevithick  2 CLIFTON PARK ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Dear sir/madam

I am writing to object to this proposed development for the following reasons. I live locally and this is my second letter of objection.

Having looked at the revised plans, I don't think these address the concerns I originally put forward which related to the loss of 15 mature trees, the woefully inadequate car-parking provision, the fact that the proposed development is out of harmony with the historic architecture of this conservation area and that the sheer size of this development will result in this area becoming very congested.

In relation to the revised plans, little effort has been made to reduce the height of the development and the extent to which this number of dwellings will still be squeezed into a very limited space. I'm now also concerned about what seems to be the loss of pavement. As I said previously, this road is well-used by local people and visitors to the Downs and I object very strongly to any suggestion that pedestrians may be being forced to use the road if pavements become crowded - as they can, particularly at weekend and when events are taking place on the Downs. With regard to street congestion, I still consider it essential for all 65 dwellings to have a parking space, rather than the proposed 45 spaces. In addition, I have also come to understand that this site cannot be considered to be previously developed land which I believe would question the legality of the zoo's application. I believe your department would be better placed to thoroughly scrutinise whether this is the case.

We are in a climate emergency and I very much regret the fact that current government policy has not kept abreast of this emergency and made appropriate adjustment to

ensure that planning applications, and all other new developments and initiatives, reflect the dangerous situation we face. I hope that whatever powers and discretion that your department and the council can exercise will be used to protect the future as the planet, as well as our local environment.

Kind regardsPamela Trevithick

  15 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Mrs Helen Blenkinsop  17 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Dear All

I live near the Zoo in Clifton. There is pressure on parking and road use in the area, and I think this will increase if more dwellings are crammed into the Zoo's old car park. I would be grateful if you would register this email as an objection to planning application no 21/01999/F.

Regards

Mrs Helen Blenkinsop

Mrs Dorinda Offord  23 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

To whom it may concern:

I objected to the previous planning application for the redevelopment of the West Car Park on the grounds that the scheme seemed to me to be fundamentally flawed, and the very minor changes which the new application makes to the scheme are still not sufficient to make me think that this plan will be of any benefit to our area. My objection stands.

Dorinda Offord,

Mrs Amie Copley  40 LYNDON MORGAN WAY   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Hello,

I made an objection the the original plans submitted by Bristol Zoo for the redevelopment of the car park.

Please note that my previous objection to the Zoo's original planning application still stands, as the new application only makes minor changes to a scheme which is fundamentally flawed and is totally inappropriate for our Conservation Area.

Best wishes

Amie Copley

  MANSION HOUSE STABLES   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

ensured that what could have been a zero carbon (or carbon negative) development falls well short

of that objective.

That alone is sufficient to ensure that the application is refused.

The proposal needs to be substantially re-worked – again (the revision has done nothing to address

this matter) - to ensure that principles which the CCSPN requires to be applied are firmly integrated

within the design process rather than as an afterthought.

Although this alone is sufficient for the decision to refuse planning permission, I note also the

following:

1. The need for the development is not demonstrated as the Core Strategy targets for housing

are already being exceeded;

2. It is not clear that this site should be considered ‘brownfield’ – it does not appear on the City

Council’s Brownfield Land register;

3. The application undermines its case in respect of affordable housing by seeking the

minimum provision (which the revised application actually falls short of). Bristol City Council

cannot achieve the targets in its existing Core Strategy as long as developers proceed in this

manner (which is also out of step with what is set out in the Draft Policies Document);

4. The original planning statement claimed 20% affordable homes in the development. The

revised application, however, includes 11 affordable apartments on a development of 55

apartments and 7 houses. The affordable dwellings quotient is, therefore, below the 20%

required (the figure is 18%) for any fast-tracking of the application;

5. The Planning Statement selectively cites Policy UL2 in the Draft Policies Document in seeking

to support a densification of development. A full reading of the same UL2 suggests that in

areas where the character of the locality demands it, reduced densities are “essential”.

There is a marginal change in density as a result of the revised application, but it is trivial

relative to the scale of the issue that the development raises. The objection on grounds of

excessive density of dwellings retains its validity;

6. The proposal – neither the initial one, nor the revision - makes any attempt to comply with

the requirements of DM16, and it makes no reference at all to DM 14, which relates to the

Health Impacts of Development. In particular, the following features give rise to concerns

regarding the health of would-be occupiers:

a. The absence of space for children to play even though it is not difficult to imagine

the development, as it is proposed, to house more than 50, and potentially, 60

children;

b. The fact that dwellings will be unable to ensure that noise levels are below those

recommended by the WHO at night because of a combination of the prevailing noise

levels (even before one considers those generated at the site itself) and the thermal

properties of the dwellings. In addition, a number of bedrooms appear to be

adjacent to 6 air-source heat pumps (ASHPs), exposing them (notwithstanding the

improvements in noise characteristics of ASHPs) to night-time noise;

7. As well as the effects on the health of would-be occupiers, the application fails to consider

the effect of noise emanating from the development itself, whether from the occupants’

vehicles, or their use of the balconies, or any other source. Only the ASHPs have been

considered as potential sources of noise which could affect existing residents. It is obvious

that the development will be a source of noise, and that the change in night-time noise (and

traffic) in particular (the car park is not generally occupied at night) has the potential to

affect existing residents;

8. Last, but by no means least, and consistent with the absence of space for play, and the

failure of design to integrate environmental features, the loss of sixteen trees from the site,

some of which are at the perimeter of the site and could have been accommodated in an

alternative, more sympathetic design, is disappointing given the stated objectives of the

applicant. There is no rationale given for the proposals to fell the trees (other than that this

is what would need to be done if the development is as proposed). The logic is that the

proposal necessitates the felling, rather than the proposal itself being influenced by the

presence of the existing trees. The revised application increases the number of replacements

proposed on site from 10 to 17. On the one hand, this confirms the nature of the previous

objection: with minimal change in design, seven additional trees magically appear in the site

plan. Nonetheless, no effort has been made to avoid felling and no effort has been made to

increase the number of trees planted on site to the level that Tree Replacement Policy

suggests should be provided on site where possible. The revision does nothing to silence the

questions regarding why it would have been impossible to design the development so that

the necessary number of replacements were integrated into the development (this would

have provided an incentive to cut down far only what was absolutely necessary). The

question of where any replacements will go remains.

This site was, before the initial application was made, one where a housing development could have

been designed in any which way: that it has the form it has is the result of placing undue emphasis

on the uplift in land value that will follow if the application is granted, and insufficient emphasis on

the environmental characteristics of the proposed development, and considerations for the health

of its occupiers and those who are resident nearby. It is completely out of character with the

location. It is not at all surprising that amidst all this, the minimal and tactical changes made in the

revised proposal have led to a reduction in the level of affordable housing to less than 20%.

Supposedly

These issues are of course linked, and they indicate the failure of the applicant to make these

linkages, which is what quality design would be expected to do. The absence of space to play is a

direct consequence of the excessive density of development relative to the character of the location.

Similarly, the request to feel large numbers of trees, and the failure to deliver the expected number

of replacement trees also reflect this excessive density. The bizarre failure to come forward with a

zero-carbon, or carbon-negative (at least in operational terms) development is unfathomable – this

was a site where all things were possible. If it is not possible to develop zero carbon homes at such a

site, then where should it ever happen?

It is interesting to reflect on the issues which the Planning Statement raised as ones that remained

to be addressed by the application following pre-application discussions. It is entirely debatable that

any of these has been achieved with the possible exception of the reduction in height. That is not

sufficient to merit consent for this proposal.

More detail is offered below.

DETAILED SUBMISSION

I make reference to the following documents:

City Council Documents

Bristol City Council (2011) Bristol Development Framework: Core Strategy, Adopted June 2011.

I refer to this as The Core Strategy

Bristol City Council (2020) Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020, u.d..

I refer to this as The RDS

Bristol City Council (2014) Site Allocations and Development Management Policies: Local Plan,

Adopted July 2014.

I refer to this as the SADMP,

Bristol City Council (2019|) Bristol Local Plan Review: Draft Policies and Development Allocations –

Consultation, March 2019

https://www.bristol.gov.uk/documents/20182/34536/Local+Plan+Review+-

+Draft+Policies+and+Development+Allocations+-+Web.pdf/2077eef6-c9ae-3582-e921-

b5d846762645

I refer to this as the Draft Policies and Development Allocations, or Draft DPDA

Bristol City Council (2018) Affordable Housing: Practice Note, April 2018

I refer to this as Affordable Housing Practice Note, or AHPN.

Bristol City Council (2020) Climate Change and Sustainability: How to design low carbon and resilient

developments: Practice Note, July 2020

I refer to this as the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note or CCSPN

Bristol City Council (2020) Bristol: One City Climate Strategy: A Strategy for a Carbon Neutral, Climate

Resilient Bristol by 2030, https://www.bristolonecity.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/one-city-

climate-strategy.pdf

Documents Submitted by the Applicant

Barton Wilmore (2021) Proposed Site Plan, Revised Plan, published 22 July 2021.

I refer to this as the ‘the revised Site Plan’.

Barton Wilmore (2021) Schedule of Accommodation, Revised Plan, published 22 July 2021.

I refer to this as the ‘the revised Schedule of Accommodation’.

Barton Willmore (2021) Planning Statement: West Car Park of Bristol Zoo Gardens, College Road,

Clifton, Report on behalf of Bristol, Clifton & West of England Zoological Society, March 2021.

I refer to this as ‘the Planning Statement’.

PEP (2021) Proposed Residential Development: Bristol Zoo Garden’s West Car Park, College Road,

Clifton, Bristol. Transport Statement for Submission, Prepared for Bristol Zoological Society. March

2020

I refer to this as the Transport Statement.

Hydrock (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Planning Noise Assessment Report For Bristol Zoo

Gardens, 26 March 2021

I refer to this as the Noise Assessment

Hydrock (2021) Bristol Zoo - West Car Park: Energy and Sustainability Statement for Bristol Zoo, 18

March 2021

I refer to this as the Energy and Sustainability Assessment

Silverback Arboricultural Consultancy Ltd (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Arboricultural Report,

March 2021.

I refer to this as the Arboricultural Report

West of England Joint Spatial Plan

West of England Joint Spatial Plan, Publication Document, November 2017,

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-

library/sites/estates/documents/West_of_England_Joint_Spatial_Plan__Publication_Document_201

7%20(5).pdf

I refer to this as the Joint Spatial Plan (or JSP)

Central Government Documents

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (2019) National Planning Policy

Framework, February 2019,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/810197/NPPF_Feb_2019_revised.pdf

I refer to this as the NPPF

BEIS (2019) Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas: Supplementary Guidance to the HM

Treasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government, April 2019,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/794737/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-emissions-for-appraisal-2018.pdf

as well as associated data tables, downloadable from

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-

emissions-for-appraisal

Others

Charity Commission for England and Wales (u.d.) Guidance: The essential trustee: what you need to

know, what you need to do,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/866947/CC3_feb20.pdf

I refer to this as The Charity Commission Guidance

ANC and the Institute of Acoustics (2020) Acoustics Ventilation And Overheating: Residential Design

Guide, January 2020.

I refer to this as the AVO Guide

Energy and Sustainability

Energy

The Energy and Sustainability Assessment makes nods in the direction of sustainability but they are

perfunctory ones. Evidently, this is not helped by the fact that the proposed 2019 Plan has not been

adopted, and that as a result, the Energy and Sustainability Statement still makes reference to the

policies in the 2011 Bristol Core Strategy, albeit that it also references the Practice Note of July 2020

on Climate Change and Sustainability: How to Design Low Carbon and Resilient Developments. That

Bristol City Council’s latest adopted plan dates from 2011 is a matter of concern, not least given that

during the intervening years, the UK has signed up to the Paris Agreement, a legally binding

international treaty on climate change, and the Council itself has declared climate and ecological

emergencies, and has committed, in the One City Plan, to becoming carbon neutral and climate

resilient by 2030. It must surely be only a matter of time before local plans are challenged in respect

of their coherence with commits made under the Paris Agreement (let alone those which may be

made at the upcoming COP26). That this proposal has been submitted on behalf of an entity that

claims to have such matters at its core is lamentable: indeed, one has to question the sincerity of

those commitments.

Notwithstanding these points, the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note (CCSPN) indicates

that:

The following key principles apply to all Sustainability Statements:

1. Sustainability Statements should address both mitigation and adaptation as set out under

policy BCS13.

2. Sustainability Statements should engage with and address the energy requirements of

policy BCS14, the water management requirements of policy BCS16 and each of the key

issues listed in policy BCS15.

3. In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possible

measures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into the

design and, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures into the

proposed development.

4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planning

permission.

5. If it is argued that including sufficient measures to meet the energy requirements of policy

BCS14 would render the development unviable, then the applicant will be required to submit

a full viability assessment.

The Energy and Sustainability Assessment claims that:

All guidelines [in the aforementioned Practice Note] throughout this document have been

adhered to in the production of this energy and sustainability strategy.

Whilst the Energy and Sustainability Assessment does indeed cover some of these matters, it does

so mainly in a perfunctory manner. The plans to make use of heat pumps are welcome, and lower U-

value materials as well, although the detail of how the demand will be matched by the supply from

the six heat pumps illustrated in the Plan in Block B of the development are not apparent (there is

zero transparency in the way the calculations have been made in respect of the climate change

performance of the different measures being proposed, not to mention, the baseline position – no

one could adjudicate sensibly on these figures as they have been presented currently). The effect of

the configuration on generation of noise for future occupants is also of concern (see above).

There is no provision made for any on-site generation of renewable electricity. This is because point

3 in the extract above from the CCSPN has not been adhered to. There is no reasonable exploration

of measures which could be adopted, let alone any rational argument as to why, for example, it

would have been unreasonable for rooftop PV to be in place in the development. Both solar thermal

and solar PV move from having potential, as per p.13 of the Energy and Sustainability Statement, to

being dismissed in the proposals. Table 7 in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment – the header

for which states that it has been taken from the CCSPN – as well as the supporting text, speak only in

general terms about how ‘consideration of conservation would need to be taken into account’, and

‘the benefit of solar thermal panels would need to be considered against impact to the local

Conservation Area and sedum roofs’.2 These are not justifications (let alone, adequate ones) for

overlooking the potential of solar PV. There are solar PV panels already on properties in Clifton in

Conservation Areas, several in close proximity to the site. Also, there is some evidence to suggest, in

respect of green rooves, that these can help improve output from solar PV because of their cooling

effect: furthermore, shaded areas might actually enhance the diversity of microclimates for wildlife.

The points made do not demonstrate why these are not viable options for inclusion in this proposed

development, which is what the CCSPN not only requires, but which, if absent, it clearly states that

the application will be refused. It follows that this application must be refused. Had this matter been

properly considered, the development itself might look rather different, for example, in respect of

orientation of the rooves. There is no reason why the provision of on-site renewable electricity is not

viable, and none has been given.

It is worth considering the overall impact of the proposed development in the light of our

understanding of the urgency with which action is required on climate change. If one reviews the

figures in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment, unsupported as they are by any evidence that

enables us to drill into the detail of the heat and electricity demand in the baseline, and with the

measures proposed in place, then one sees that using the SAP 2012 figures (see Table 1 in the

Energy and Sustainability Assessment), where the carbon intensity of electricity is relatively high, the

proposed measures associated with the proposal deliver a 33% reduction relative to residual

emissions. Note that these residual emissions are relatively high because the energy efficiency

measures are somewhat limited, notwithstanding the intent to use materials with a lower U-value

than under Part L of the Building Regulations – the measures achieve a 5% improvement relative to

what is required to comply with Building Regulations. The Energy and Sustainability Assessment does

not actually report how this Figure has been calculated other than through referencing U-values. No

materials are actually mentioned, the U-values are simply stated, with no reference to what it is that

delivers those lower U-values, and hence, what fabric is to be used. This is despite the fact that the

CCSPN is very clear, as per Table 1 in the CCSPN, that:

The summary table should be supported by a written explanation of the measures proposed

and a full set of calculations as set out under “Detailed Measures” below. Where relevant,

the proposed measures should also be shown on the application drawings.

2 As a separate point, in terms of the design of the proposed buildings, one might reasonably expect, when new developments are proposed, that whether in a conservation area or any other location, the design of the buildings might actually consider how beneficial attributes, such a rooftop PV, can be integrated so that they are acceptable. Instead, the possibility is described and then rejected out of hand.

These calculations are not presented. Without seeing these, and understanding the limited extent of

the demand reduction measures proposed, we cannot tell whether a less limited selection of

demand reduction measures might have reduced residual emissions: the higher the residual

emissions (i.e., the weaker the demand reduction measures), the easier it becomes for the applicant

to demonstrate a 20% reduction in their residual emissions (because the scope for doing so is,

somewhat perversely, increased). There is, therefore, a separate question to be asked as to whether

the energy hierarchy has been adequately respected.

Nonetheless, back to the issue of on-site generation from PV. The Energy and Sustainability

Assessment reports how residual emissions reduction would have been affected if the lower carbon

intensity figures featuring in the proposed update of the SAP had been used:

Using the SAP 10.1 carbon factors, it is anticipated that site emissions would reduce by a

total of c.82% from the building regulations baseline.

The main change here is that under SAP 10.1, the figure for the carbon intensity of electricity

generation is reduced from 519g CO2e / kWh to 136g CO2e/kWh. It doesn’t require too much

imagination to consider what change in emissions might have been achieved had the development

actually integrated itself on-site PV providing electricity at (close-to) zero g CO2e / kWh (and under

the current SAP approach, this might be even more significant because of the higher carbon intensity

of grid electricity that is assumed – we cannot tell because the calculations are not offered up, even

though, as mentioned above, the CCSPN is clear that they should be).

There is, furthermore a separate point regarding the appropriateness of the proposed update to the

SAP, not least in its alignment (or lack of it) with Government Guidance (from BEIS). The proposed

update to the SAP appears to be taking its cue from the Tables which BEIS published regarding the

Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas. These are published as Supplementary Guidance to

the HM Treasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government, and are used to

appraise policies and projects being considered by Government. The Guidance supporting the Tables

suggests that where one is considering small changes in demand for electricity, it is not the grid

average figures that should be used to understand the impact of the change (which is what the SAP

revision would imply). To quote the Guidance:

For estimating changes in emissions from changes in grid electricity use, analysts should use

the (long run) marginal grid electricity emissions factors in data table 1.

The aforementioned Table 1, accompanying the Guidance from BEIS, also states (in the relevant

Excel sheet):

Long-run marginal emissions factors should be used for measuring small changes in

consumption or generation. Grid average emissions factors are used for footprinting.

This is not a footprinting exercise: the aim is to understand the consequences of new development

that introduces a change in demand for electricity.

An extract from Table 1, from BEIS, is shown below.

Year

Long-run marginal Grid average

Consumption-based Generation-

based

Consumption-based Generation-

based

Domestic Commercial/ Public sector Industrial Domestic

Commercial/ Public sector Industrial

2010 0.389 0.382 0.375 0.357 0.501 0.492 0.483 0.460

2011 0.384 0.377 0.370 0.350 0.485 0.476 0.467 0.443

2012 0.377 0.370 0.363 0.343 0.532 0.523 0.513 0.485

2013 0.367 0.361 0.354 0.336 0.495 0.486 0.477 0.452

2014 0.360 0.354 0.347 0.328 0.441 0.433 0.425 0.402

2015 0.350 0.344 0.337 0.320 0.369 0.363 0.356 0.337

2016 0.340 0.333 0.327 0.311 0.291 0.285 0.280 0.266

2017 0.330 0.324 0.318 0.301 0.247 0.243 0.238 0.226

2018 0.319 0.313 0.307 0.291 0.180 0.177 0.174 0.165

2019 0.308 0.302 0.296 0.281 0.146 0.143 0.141 0.133

2020 0.296 0.290 0.285 0.270 0.141 0.138 0.135 0.128

2021 0.283 0.278 0.272 0.258 0.115 0.113 0.111 0.105

2022 0.269 0.264 0.259 0.246 0.107 0.105 0.103 0.098

2023 0.255 0.250 0.246 0.233 0.112 0.110 0.108 0.102

2024 0.240 0.236 0.231 0.219 0.104 0.102 0.100 0.095

2025 0.224 0.220 0.216 0.205 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.096

2026 0.207 0.203 0.200 0.189 0.099 0.097 0.095 0.090

2027 0.189 0.186 0.182 0.173 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.096

2028 0.171 0.167 0.164 0.156 0.100 0.098 0.096 0.091

2029 0.151 0.148 0.145 0.138 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.084

2030 0.130 0.127 0.125 0.118 0.083 0.081 0.080 0.076

2031 0.116 0.113 0.111 0.105 0.073 0.072 0.070 0.067

2032 0.103 0.101 0.099 0.094 0.061 0.060 0.059 0.056

2033 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.084 0.057 0.056 0.055 0.052

2034 0.082 0.080 0.079 0.075 0.049 0.048 0.048 0.045

2035 0.073 0.071 0.070 0.066 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2036 0.065 0.064 0.063 0.059 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2037 0.058 0.057 0.056 0.053 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2038 0.052 0.051 0.050 0.047 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2039 0.046 0.045 0.044 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2040 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2041 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.036 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.036

2042 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.035 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.035

2043 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.034 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.034

2044 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.032 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.032

2045 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.031 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.031

2046 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.030 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.030

2047 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.029 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.029

2048 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.028 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.028

2049 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.026 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.026

2050 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025

The relevant column for the proposed development should be the second one: the long-run

marginal figure, consumption based, for the domestic sector. The proposed SAP figures are more

appropriate for a footprinting exercise, and are essentially what appears in the sixth column: grid-

average, consumption-based, domestic. Footprinting of a development which already exists (and so,

because it already exists, introduces no change in demand) is quite different from understanding the

impact of new development that introduces marginal changes in demand for electricity: that is the

case for this proposal, hence the relevance of the long-run marginal figures for the carbon intensity

of electricity used.3

Note also that whilst the figures in both columns are expected to fall between 2021 and 2030,

neither figure reaches ‘zero’ (or close to it) by 2030. Even without the details of the calculation being

provided, it is clear that this new development will not be zero carbon by 2030. This is of relevance

in respect of the One City Climate Strategy, to which the Energy and Sustainability Assessment

makes no reference. The One City Climate Strategy has two goals for ‘Buildings’, the first of which is:

2030 goal: All buildings in the city will be carbon neutral and use resources efficiently,

ensuring everyone can enjoy affordable warmth in winter and avoid overheating in summer.

The related objectives include the following (by 2030):

New buildings are carbon neutral and climate resilient (aligning heat provision to the city’s

heat decarbonisation programme).

There is no possibility of this new development meeting this objective as it has been proposed.

In terms of electricity generation, the One City Climate Strategy states:

Bristol will need to play its role locally in enabling this national grid decarbonisation. The

evidence demonstrates that the city can not generate within its boundaries enough zero

carbon electricity to meet its own electricity demand. So it will rely on new renewable

generation being installed elsewhere. But it can generate more ‘in area’ by realising

significantly more of the potential for rooftop solar PV on residential and non-residential

buildings across the city (estimated at 500MW at viable rates of return – only 28MW of

which has been realised to date).

The point here is that the performance of this development would have been significantly enhanced,

in terms of climate credentials, by inclusion of solar PV, and this is what would have been done to

bring the development into line with the One City Climate Strategy. There is, as noted above, no

reason not to do this, and the fact that none has been given should lead to the application being

refused, in line with the CCSPN.

It should also be considered that it may have been possible for the provision of on-site PV to have

rendered affordable homes ‘even more affordable’ by reducing the costs of electricity consumption,

these being likely to show some increase in future.

Given, therefore:

1. The obvious benefits of zero carbon sources of electricity in driving the emissions from the

development down;

2. The fact that the Energy and Sustainability Assessment offers no reasoning that would

indicate that such sources are non-viable;

3 What BEIS is essentially saying is that by adding new demand, the pace at which the grid is decarbonised is slowed down. This is entirely sensible. What the SAP approach should be doing is to ensure that the carbon factors used reflect the impact of the development on demand. Unless it does so, it is not consistent with the approach used by Government for policy and project appraisal, as indicated by Guidance prepared by BEIS, and used to inform assessments using the well-respected Green Book appraisal proposed by HM Treasury.

3. The fact that the CCSPN state that:

In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possible

measures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into

the design and, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures

into the proposed development.

4. And that the CCSPN also states that:

4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planning

permission.

then the application for planning permission must be refused.

The Energy and Sustainability Assessment, and by extension, the application as a whole, does not do

what the CCSPN requires it do. There is no meaningful test of viability which has been ‘failed’ by the

obvious opportunity for the provision of solar PV.

Instead of achieving 33% reduction in residual greenhouse gas emissions (and 37% reduction against

a Building Regs compliant development – note, this figure is wrongly labelled in the Energy and

Sustainability Assessment), this ought to have been a zero carbon development, or at least very

close to it, if only it had followed what the CCSPN required it to do.

We note that the Planning Statement (7.51) reads:

The applicant wholeheartedly supports Bristol City Council’s commitment to becoming

carbon neutral and climate resilient by 2030.

The applicant – and its Trustees - need to be made aware, if they are not already, that this proposal

falls a long way short of demonstrating support for the Council’s commitments, whatever Barton

Willmore may claim. If the applicant really did wholeheartedly support the commitment to carbon

neutrality, then this application would be aligned with that objective: it is not. It must be rejected.

Trees

Trees are part of the green infrastructure that sites should, in accordance with various plan policies,

integrate into their proposals. This proposal does the opposite: it seeks permission to remove 16

trees, one of which is described as Category U. The Arboricultural Report notes:

Trees Identified for Retention and Removal.

It is proposed to remove fifteen trees, detailed below, to facilitate the proposed

development. T16 will be removed in accordance with good arboricultural practice.

Cat A Cat B Cat C Cat U

T02 T01, T04, T08, T09, T10, T15, T17, T18, T19

T03, T11, T13, T14, T22

T16

1 9 5 1

The Table below para 5.7 in the Planning Statement includes the following:

There are a number of good quality mature trees on the site that are to be retained, as they

are both ecologically important, and add to the distinctive character of the area.

Any smaller trees that are required to be replaced within the car park will be better

integrated into the development’s design layout in line with Bristol City Council’s Tree

Replacement Standard and enhance the ecological value of the site.

The inclusion of green roofs and living walls further support wildlife, and integrate the tree

planting with other spaces for wildlife to nest, forage and shelter.

The wording only obliquely references the loss of trees at the site. The tree planting referred to

relates to trees being replaced, this number being fewer, in the original application, than the

number for which permission to remove was being sought. The statement masked the fact that

more trees were to be lost than would be replaced. The suggestion in the above paragraph that

trees ‘required to be replaced’ are ‘smaller’ is less relevant than what is actually being lost. The

proposal for new trees, as per the original proposal, does not actually align with the Tree

Replacement Standard. In the revised proposal, with minimal changes to the design, the number of

proposed trees has been increased, but not in a manner that meets the Tree Replacement Standard.

Furthermore, three of the seven additional trees in the new proposal are squashed between parking

bays, a feat made possible by reducing (apparently, from the Site Plan) the size of the three trees

initially proposed. Exactly what has changed in the revision is not clear, but for all the world, it

simply looks like someone has shunted a few car spaces about to allow the applicant – Bristol Zoo –

to mitigate some of the embarrassment that it would be proposing a development with fewer trees

on it than are currently in situ. This is trumpeted in the design and Access Statement Addendum

(p.7):

Additional tree planting has been proposed within the development to improve to enhance

the ecology and biodiversity. This has been achieved through re-distributing parking bays

along the rear elevation of Block A, creating additional room for soft landscaping.

Where trees are being felled to enable development on the site, we are now proposing that

these are replaced on site with more proposed resulting in a net gain of two trees.

To be clear, once again, the ‘net gain’ of two trees is not aligned with the Council’s Tree replacement

Policy, and nor should the use of the term ‘net gain’ be confused or conflated with the requirement

to demonstrate biodiversity net gain as per the metric proposed by Defra and Natural England

(though it seems the applicants are seeking to achieve a 10% ‘net gain’ of tree numbers on site).

The revised application still seeks to remove the same number of trees as previously. Table from the

Arboricultural Report has been reproduced below, highlighting the trees surveyed, and indicating

(through the shaded polygons) the trees which the Arboricultural Report seeks permission to

remove.

There was, and still is, no exploration of why they necessarily need permanent removal: the report

moves easily into a straightforward proposal for removal. Para 1.3 of the report reads:

1.3 Specifically, this report and the accompanying information are supplied to:

• Identify the constraints that trees on and adjacent to the site present to the development

of the site, to inform the site design process.

But the report does not show evidence of this. The figures in the Appendices show that the nature of

the proposed development was already established at the time the report was being prepared. The

aim appears not to have been to identify constraints, and as a result, to inform site design: rather,

the report seems to have been prepared with the express purpose of indicating what trees should be

removed to facilitate an already well-developed proposal. The trees have not informed the fate of

the development: rather, the development appears to have informed the fate of the trees, or at

least, that is what the Report leads us to infer. We are all left wondering whether the removal of

trees could have been reduced, or rendered unnecessary, through a better design process where the

Arboricultural Report actually did inform the site design. Why, for example, do trees T01 and T02

and T13 and T14 have to go? Why could the development not have been designed to accommodate

them given they could easily have been at the perimeter of the development, alternatively

conceived? There is not logic or justification: the trees are condemned because the Report says they

need to be removed to accommodate this proposal. That cannot be considered an adequate way to

proceed, and is inconsistent with BCS9 (see below).

Notwithstanding the above, in the Arboricultural Report, there is recognition of the fact that

mitigation would be required in the event of removal:

6.4.1 Mitigation In accordance with Bristol City Council Tree Replacement Scheme (BTRS) the

removal of the afore mentioned trees will require either replacement tree planting on site or

a monetary contribution for replacement tree planting elsewhere in the area. The number of

replacement trees, or amount of the monetary contribution, is calculated on the stem

diameter of trees proposed for removal.

6.4.2 Calculations of the obligations for the removal of the trees are listed below. The

obligation can be fulfilled with a mixture of replacement trees and monetary contributions if

desired. In accordance with Bristol City Councils Tree Replacement Scheme the removal of

the aforementioned trees will require the planting of 28 x replacement trees or a monetary

contribution of £21,420.00

The implied assumption is that monetary contributions would be made at the rate for a tree in open

ground with no tree pit required. These, though, may be trees lost to the locality, and certainly, the

would-be residents.

In the Planning Statement, no mention to monetary contributions is made. At para 7.68, it notes:

7.68 Eight of the existing trees are to be retained, with replacement tree planting proposed

to mitigate against the loss of the trees to be removed.

The same statement appears in the Design and Access Statement. There is no mention of monetary

contributions, and no reference to off-site planting.

According to the Arboricultural Report, the removal of the trees as proposed would require 28 new

trees. Reviewing the Proposed Site Layout, I could count 10 proposed trees (not 28). There seem to

be 18 trees which have ‘gone missing’. In the revised proposal. There are 17 proposed trees. That

leaves, still, 11 that are missing.

The Planning Statement from Barton Wilmore on behalf of its client reads as follows regarding their

client:

As a wildlife and conservation charity, it also wants to give a helping hand to local wildlife.

Paragraph 2.1 of the Planning Statement notes:

The Society’s mission is saving wildlife together and their vision is for wildlife to be a part of

everyone’s lives and for people to want to, and be enabled to, protect wildlife now and for

the future.

This application does nothing to reflect that intention. The charity has five objectives as part of its

‘saving wildlife together’ strategy, and one of them is to engage with its public; another is to create

conservationists; and another is to sustain the environment. None of that is evident in this

application, made on its behalf. It may be that the Bristol Zoological Society felt that a revision in the

proposal was necessary to avoid the uncomfortable position it was in of proposing a net reduction in

trees on or around the site. Nonetheless, the revised application seems to have squashed in a few

more trees that might make opening a car door somewhat problematic, and relative to the tree

replacement standard, it is still missing 11 trees.4 We know little, or anything about what the species

of tree will be – this surely matters – this is not just ‘a numbers game’, but that seems to be how this

revision has been made. What are depicted in the initial application as large canopy specimens

adjacent to the parking bays have been ‘knocked down to size’ so as to squash in a few more trees

to ‘make up the numbers’.

In the Planning Statement, as the authors run through relevant policies, they note:

Core Strategy Policy BCS9 sets out that green infrastructure assets include open spaces,

gardens, allotments street trees and planting. Development should incorporate new and/or

enhanced green infrastructure of an appropriate type, standard and size. Where on-site

provision of green infrastructure is not possible, contributions will be sought to make

appropriate provision for green infrastructure off site.

Going back to the previous point regarding the Arboricultural Report, and the fact that it constitutes

an ex post proposal (it cannot be termed ‘a justification’) for removing trees to facilitate a pre-

designed development, the proposal clearly fails to implement this policy. There is no reason at all

why an innovative design could not have incorporated new and / or enhanced green infrastructure.

There was nothing compelling the proposed density of dwellings from the outset: that was free for

4 As per my footnote 1, this is another example where the design trumps the sustainability concerns rather than being undertaken in such a way that the sustainability concerns are integrated into the site. It is unfortunate that neither the Arboricultural report nor the ecological report were required to advise on the nature / form / siting of the 28 replacement trees (though now completely comprehensible since it seems it was never intended to replace them). It does raise, then, the question as to whether the trees and their location are appropriate – the most information we have comes from the Ecological Report which states: ‘Elsewhere planting on the site will include species that are of value for wildlife, including priority species. These will include berry-bearing trees and shrubs; trees that are either native or are closely related to native species (such as ornamental Malus and Pyrus spp, which support most of the insects supported by native species; and nectar-rich herbaceous plants that are of value to pollinating insects such as bumblebees.’ There is not much by way of definitive strategy, other than reducing the number of trees.

the applicant to determine. There was nothing compelling the design to be exactly as it is proposed.

The proposal constitutes a failure to implement BCS9, and a failure in design.

It is difficult to square the stated mission of the applicant with the nature of this application. The

application to remove 15 + 1 trees and to propose a number of replacements of an undefined nature

is unfortunate. The Arboricultural Report gives options, but was clearly not appraised of the form of

development being proposed (had it been so, it would have been able to comment on the loss of

trees).

Noise

The Noise Assessment is inadequate, and nothing in the revised proposal changes that fact. It fails to

consider, in any meaningful sense, the contribution that a new development will bring to the existing

area. In this respect, it is non-compliant with Policy DM35 which clearly requires Mitigation to

consider ‘measures to reduce or contain generated noise’. It is rather bewildering that the new

dwellings are not considered, effectively, to be the source of any new noise, not least at night, when

the balconies, which are described as a feature of the development, might be used by residents

generating music and noise in their own right. This is in addition to any additional night-time

transport noise which the development would bring to existing residents.

In respect of the effect of noise on the development itself, it is worth quoting the text which

supports DM35 (which is due to be retained in a revised plan) in the SADMP:

2.35.4 Noise-sensitive development, including houses, hospitals and schools, should not

generally be located next to existing sources of significant environmental noise. Depending

on the level of environmental noise, the impact can in some cases be satisfactorily mitigated,

allowing the noise-sensitive development to proceed on the affected site. However, the

design of mitigation measures should have regard to the need to provide a satisfactory

environment for future occupiers and take account of other material planning considerations

such as urban design.

2.35.5 Applications for residential development in areas of significant existing environmental

and neighbourhood noise will not usually be permitted unless a robust scheme of mitigation

is put forward and the benefits of the proposal in terms of regeneration are considered to

outweigh the impacts on the amenity of future occupiers, for instance where the proposed

development would support investment in centres. In general, the following values will be

sought for residential development:

i. Daytime (07.00 - 23.00) 35 dB LAeq 16 hours in all rooms and 50 dB in outdoor living areas.

ii. Nightime (23.00 - 07.00) 30 dB LAeq 8 hours and LAmax less than 45 dB in bedrooms

The Noise Assessment states:

the night-time noise levels at College Road Façades will be 51 dB LAeq(free-field). Any

standard modern construction using double glazed windows and trickle vents is likely to

provide a composite sound reduction index of at least 25 dB Dw. Therefore, the recommend

internal noise limits from BS8233:2014 and BCC Policy DM35 (30 dB LAeq) will be achieved.

When windows are open to cool an overheating room, noise levels may be up to 6dB above

the recommended criterion.

The Assessment goes on to say:

This [i.e. a 6dB exceedance of the 30dB noise limit] is slightly above the level considered to

represent “reasonable” conditions according to BS8233:2014 but it is not a significant

exceedance and sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected. With reference to the AVO

Guide, night-time noise levels are of low significance and further assessment of the

overheating condition is not required

This point, regarding the exceedance ‘not being significant’, is the opinion of Hydrock, the authors of

the Assessment. The AVO Guide (not fully referenced in the Assessment – this is the Acoustics

Ventilation And Overheating: Residential Design Guide of January 2020, produced by ANC and the

Institute of Acoustics) may be being misrepresented. The AVO Guide does not constitute official

government advice.

Extracts from the Noise Assessment’s own Appendix confirm the fact that such an exceedance is not

of ‘low significance’:

Extract 1: Regarding BS 8233:2014 -Guidance on sound insulation and noise reduction for

buildings

Whilst BS 8233:2014 recognises that a guideline value may be set in terms of SEL or

LAFmax in bedrooms during the night-time to minimise the risk from regular

individual noise events that can affect sleep quality, a specific criterion is not

stipulated. Therefore, guidance on maximum night-time noise levels from World

Health Organisation (WHO) 1999: Guidelines for Community Noise are often used in

the UK, including within ProPG.

British Standard 4142:2014+A1:2019

a) Typically, the greater this difference, the greater the magnitude of the impact.

b) A difference of around +10 dB or more is likely to be an indication of a significant

adverse impact, depending on the context.

c) A difference of around +5 dB is likely to be an indication of an adverse impact,

depending on the context.

Contrary to the consultants’ views, therefore, this suggests a difference of 6dB may be considered a

significant exceedance.

Extract 2: World Health Organisation (WHO) Guidelines on Community Noise

When noise is continuous, the equivalent sound pressure level should not exceed 30 dB(A)

indoors, if negative effects on sleep are to be avoided. For noise with a large proportion of

low-frequency sound a still lower guideline value is recommended.

The consultants’ view that ‘sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected’ by a noise level of 36dB

(presumably, 51dB from traffic with 15dB attenuation from an open window) is flatly contradicted

by WHO Guidelines, which the authors themselves have helpfully cited.

It is worth cross-referencing the Energy and Sustainability Assessment’s ‘Overheating Analysis’. This

considers the susceptibility of the dwellings to overheating. It considers both CIBSE TM52 and TM59

assessments. My own understanding of these is that these assessments, of which only TM59 is

specifically for residential dwellings, deliver results which are dependent, in part, on the

assumptions made regarding ventilation strategies. Hence, whilst the Overheating Analysis delivers a

‘pass’ according to the consultants, it is unclear to what extent it does so contingent only upon

ventilation strategies implying that windows are kept open. Given the noise assessment, this is

especially true for the second criterion in TM59. In this respect, the Energy and Sustainability

Assessment states (Sn 7.2 fourth bullet):

An openable window strategy has been developed to reduce the risk of overheating in

summer in line with CIBSE TM59 methodology requirements

The interplay between these factors – the susceptibility to overheating and the exposure to noise,

especially at night-time, and given also that no account has been taken of the noise generated by the

development itself – deserves much closer consideration than has been given.

The plan for renewable energy generation – central to achieving the required reduction in CO2

emissions from the proposed development to comply with the requirements of the outdated

planning policy – is centred on the deployment of air-source heat pumps (ASHPs). The Energy and

Sustainability Assessment indicates that these will be housed as follows:

ASHP units would need to sit in either an acoustically treated external plant enclosure or

within a well-ventilated internal plantroom. The current architectural design allows for an

internal ground floor plant room in Block B with louvred wall to allow for suitable airflow.

A review of the floorplan for Block B indicates a plan for 6 Mitsubishi CAHV units (it is not completely

clear whether the room will enable their proper functioning – some of the dimensions look suspect

given the face to face / side by side nature of the layout). It is a peculiar design choice that these will

sit directly under the bedrooms of Flat 53 and Flat 58, and beside the bedroom in Flat 48. Perhaps

other considerations have trumped the issue of exposure of residents in the development to the

ASHPs: the Planning Noise Assessment considers the noise from ASHPs largely in respect of their

impact on nearby existing residential properties. Laudable as this is as a principle, it overlooks the

need to ensure that the development is also tolerable to those who will be living there in future. It is

difficult to imagine circumstances where the bedroom windows of the Flats mentioned would be

exposed to noise levels below those that British Standards and the WHO consider likely to be

injurious to sleep, and thence, to the health of residents.

There are, surely, better configurations of this proposal which would allow improved mitigation of

noise. There is no noise mitigation between the main source of noise – the road – and the

development itself. There is, in short, no mitigation other than the fabric of the building. The density

of development leads to a citing of the ASHPs which leads to a high likelihood of sleep disturbance in

the bedrooms of some of the flats. Not everyone can sleep with double-glazed windows closed

(even ones with trickle vents) at night. That is before one even considers the fact that the proposed

development might, itself, be a source of night-time noise, whether from residents on the many

balconies or from the additional night-time transport that the suite will undoubtedly generate.

Policy DM35 clearly states:

Development will not be permitted if mitigation cannot be provided to an appropriate

standard with an acceptable design, particularly in proximity to sensitive existing uses or

sites

On the above basis, and given the requirements of DM35, and given also the very likely impact on

sleep – casually and erroneously dismissed by the consultants - of having a window open at night at

the proposed properties, the development should not be permitted.

Is the Site ‘brownfield’?

The Planning Statement accompanying the application asserts (para 1.2):

The site is brownfield as it currently is a car park and provides ancillary storage. The site is

within the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area.

The site does not appear on the City Council’s Brownfield Land register. It may also be a moot point

that the car park qualifies as ‘previously developed land’ given the definition in the NPPF of

‘previously developed land’ (commonly referred to as ‘brownfield’). The NPPF definition is:

Previously developed land: Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure,

including the curtilage of the developed land (although it should not be assumed that the

whole of the curtilage should be developed) and any associated fixed surface infrastructure.

This excludes: land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that

has been developed for minerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where

provision for restoration has been made through development control procedures; land in

built-up areas such as private residential gardens, parks, recreation grounds and allotments;

and land that was previously-developed but where the remains of the permanent structure

or fixed surface structure have blended into the landscape in the process of time.

Although a car park could be considered to be ‘previously developed land’, it might not be so in all

cases: the West Car Park is essentially an area of hard-standing with minor ancillary structures. It

could be considered that the proposal for development represents the type of development – albeit

on a larger scale – that the exclusions in the NPPF were designed to prevent. This is especially

relevant given the planning history of the site – the proposed development is taking place on land

which was, in 2000, partly used for greenhouses. This is hardly land that has been subject to major

development prior to this application.

In any event, even if the site is ‘brownfield’, this is clearly not a reason to give the go-ahead for the

development. Nothing in the revised proposal detracts from the relevance of this point.

Need for the development

The Planning Statement also states (Table under para 5.7):

The Society is proposing the redevelopment of the car park to deliver much needed housing

on a brownfield site in a central location in line with principles of the NPPF and local planning

policy.

The suggested ‘much needed’ nature of the housing is at odds with the figures in the Council’s Core

Strategy. We demonstrate below that the identified need will be exceeded.

In the Core Strategy, BC5 stated:

The Core Strategy aims to deliver new homes within the built up area to contribute towards

accommodating a growing number of people and households in the city. Provision of new

homes will be in accordance with the spatial strategy for Bristol set out in this Core Strategy

and it is envisaged that 30,600 new homes will be provided in Bristol between 2006 and

2026. Additional provision which accords with the spatial strategy may be appropriate within

the plan period.

The minimum target will be 26,400 homes between 2006 and 2026. The appropriate level of

new homes will be reviewed within 5 years of the adoption of the Core Strategy.

The 2020 Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020 (The RDS) noted (see Table 1 in the RDS –

also, para 1.10):

Since 2006, 24,669 dwellings have been complete

This is the net figure.

The RDS also noted (para 1.3) that:

At 31st March 2020 there are 2,938 dwellings under construction, 8,902 with planning

permission not started and a further 910 dwellings on sites with planning permission subject

to the signing of a Section 106 agreement, totalling 12,750 – see Table 2.

Even if one takes into account only those dwellings under construction, then the target in BC5 is

exceeded.

Even the most conservative estimate of the rate at which sites with planning consent will lead on to

construction implies that the level of housing need which has been identified within the existing plan

will be far exceeded without any new planning consents.

That does not, in itself, indicate that no additional housing development should be granted: it does,

however, place the above comments in context. Against the policies in the Core Strategy, this cannot

be considered ‘much needed housing’. The need was identified in the Core Strategy and it has

already been exceeded. The argument regarding need has no merit in relation to Plan policies.

Housing density

Responding to the view that the density of housing proposed in the development was too high, the

Planning Statement (Table below para 5.7) stated:

As a charity the Trustees are legally required to obtain maximum value from the charity’s

assets to reinvest in its charitable objectives.

‘Value’ has never been synonymous with ‘price’: the whole basis of Government’s ‘Best Value’

regime for local government was partly designed to ensure that contracts would not be awarded

purely on price. The best value outcome might not be the one that generates the highest sale price

for the land for which the planning application has been submitted.

Nonetheless, this is somewhat different to the wording in the Charities Commission Guidance on the

matter, at para 7.6: 5

Most charities can buy, sell or lease land when they need to. When selling or leasing land,

trustees must try to get the best deal for the charity (unless they are making the disposal to

further the charity’s purposes).

One can argue the toss about the term ‘best deal’, but it might not be the same as ‘maximum value,

let alone, ‘highest price’. Yet on the matter of whether the disposal is being made to further the

charity’s purposes, the Bristol Zoo website includes the following:

5 Charity Commission for England and Wales (u.d.) Guidance: The essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/866947/CC3_feb20.pdf

To safeguard the future of Bristol Zoological Society, we are relocating Bristol Zoo to the Wild

Place Project site to create a world-class zoo for Bristol and the West of England.

As part of the first phase of this new strategy, an application for planning permission has

been submitted for residential development of Bristol Zoo Garden’s West Car Park on College

Road. The sale of the West Car Park will provide a vital contribution to the funds required to

deliver the first phase of the new Bristol Zoo.

It would be difficult to argue against the view that these words indicate that the disposal is being

made to further the charity’s purposes (in which case, whatever the meaning of ‘best deal’, the

requirement might not even apply).

What is of concern, however, is how the Trustees’ responsibilities are invoked in part as an

explanation for the density of proposed development (in the Table in the original Planning

Statement that follows Para 5.7). On density of dwellings, the Planning Statement is highly selective

in its citing of draft policies. For example, the Planning Statement reads:

In the emerging Draft Policies and Development Allocations document the site is located

within the inner urban (more intensive) zone, where the minimum density is 120 dph (Policy

UL2 Urban Densities). Similarly, the adopted Urban Living SPD (2019) identifies a density

within urban settings of 120 dph.

Policy UL2 in the Draft Policies Document reads as follows:

For major development (including at least 10 dwellings), where specified by Table 6.2 below,

a higher minimum net density will be sought on suitable sites in each area.

In assessing the suitability of sites for these higher densities, consideration will be given to

the characteristics of the site and its context. Densities below the suggested minimum may

be acceptable where:

• It is essential to respect the character of the locality or protect the character and

setting of heritage assets;

• Where a proposal includes house types which result in densities below the minimum

but would otherwise make a significant contribution to the creation of mixed and

balanced communities; or

• Where market signals, local housing market trends and local housing needs

demonstrate that higher density forms of development are not viable

Evidently, the selective citation of draft policies is deliberate, and intended to indicate that the

application is responding to the requirements of a policy. The same selective citation occurs in

paragraphs 7.40 – 7.41 of the Planning Statement. In any event, the full reading of Policy UL2 that is

referred to would admit of the necessity – it actually uses the word ‘essential’ - of a much reduced

density of dwellings where the character of the locality demands it. There could not be a more

obvious application of the essential nature of that reduced density than in the proposed, and

revised, applications. The scheme proposed is akin to placing a housing estate on the edge of the

Downs, which under no reasonable interpretation of the adjective could be considered to be ‘urban’.

I note that a consequence of this ‘maximum value’ pursuit of density of development is that children

are expected to play in an area on the other side of a fairly major road, the A4176, or an 11 minute

walk away at an already well-utilised playground. The Planning Statement notes (para 7.50):

Children’s play space

7.50 Children’s play space is not provided on site, given access to a large area of public open

space immediately to the North of the A4176 Clifton Down. Children’s play equipment is

provided within an 11-minute walk of the site at Clifton Suspension Bridge Playground. Open

green space to play on Clifton Down, as well as informal recreation and a number of sports

clubs and activities is available within a 2-minute walk (150m).

The Downs is a tremendous amenity, but occupants of dwellings on the site would have good reason

to be concerned for the welfare of smaller children, if their intended play area is either on the other

side of the A4176, or an 11 minute walk away at the Suspension Bridge (already well-utilized). The

absence of on-site space for this is incredibly disappointing and suggests the outcome will be the

construction of dwellings that entrench ill-health, notwithstanding the proximity to the Downs. It is

also true that any ecological features incorporated onsite – and these have the character of an

afterthought (see below) – would be unlikely to be incorporated in a manner that could inspire the

next generation of conservationists (which the Zoo’s strategy indicates that it seeks to do).

If one makes an assumption that, in each proposed dwelling, one child is in each bedroom above and

beyond the first (and admittedly, this might not be correct), then there would be around 60 children

housed on the site (based on the revised application). The issue here, perhaps, is not the proximity

of alternative space, but the potential number of residents who have no direct access to play space.

In a development that could house 60 children, is that an acceptable form of design? Should any

development with 60 children on site be designed with no access to play space?

The proposal makes no attempt to comply with the requirements of DM16, and it makes no

reference at all to DM 14, which relates to the Health Impacts of Development. Development

Management Policy 14, which we understand to be retained in proposed revisions to the Local Plan,

reads as follows (see the SADMP):

Development should contribute to reducing the causes of ill health, improving health and reducing health inequalities within the city through:

i. Addressing any adverse health impacts; and ii. Providing a healthy living environment; and iii. Promoting and enabling healthy lifestyles as the normal, easy choice; and iv. Providing good access to health facilities and services.

Developments that will have an unacceptable impact on health and wellbeing will not be permitted. A Health Impact Assessment will be required for residential developments of 100 or more units, non-residential developments of 10,000m² or more and for other developments where the proposal is likely to have a significant impact on health and wellbeing. Where significant impacts are identified, measures to mitigate the adverse impact of the development will be provided and/or secured by planning obligations.

Whilst it is clear that a health impact assessment is not required in this case, it is questionable that

the development could claim to contribute much by way of improving health within the city, given

its apparent dismissal of the need for provision of any on-site locations for play, or even, locations

where – consistent with the professed concerns of the applicant – the next generation of nature

enthusiasts could be fostered. This is a massive missed opportunity for the applicant: there can be

few locations in Bristol which would have been as well suited for this. Yet the trade-off has been

made clear: “density of development trumps health”, when it comes to maximizing the uplift of the

value of land if it achieves planning consent.

The Council should consider this matter carefully. As the Core Strategy notes:

4.21.11 The built environment should be designed to deliver safe, secure, attractive, healthy,

comfortable and convenient places in which to live, work, play and spend time. Development

should take the opportunities available to improve the quality and appearance of an area

and the way it functions. The built environment should be inclusive, respecting how people

experience the city and addressing the needs of all in society

We doubt this can be said of this development. Why are so few of the trees which are proposed for

removal being replaced on the site? Why is there so little green infrastructure on the site? The

densification is not only inappropriate to the location: it is ‘designing in’ ill health.

Traffic

In relation to traffic, the same Table under para 5.7 notes the response as follows:

The assessment by PEP has identified hourly traffic flows through the College Road/Cecil

Road during the day as a result of the development would be around six vehicles. This

equates to one vehicle every 10 minutes which would also not be a material increase. The

increase in traffic identified above would also only be temporary until Bristol Zoo Gardens

closes in late 2022.

The proposed redevelopment Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) is predicted to be 159. The

existing trip generation, for when the site was operating as a car park, was 206 AADT. Traffic

flows are therefore predicted to decrease.

There seems little acknowledgement of the influence on night-time traffic flows and noise: there is

very little of this at present from the Car Park’s existing use. Indeed, a search for the term ‘noise’ in

the Transport Statement reveals zero hits. In other words, there is no acknowledgement of what

impact the change in the timing of use of cars in relation to the proposed development could have.

This is an important omission, both for the prospective residents and those who reside in the

vicinity. The ‘traffic’ is not merely a matter of ‘who parks where?’, but also, one of when the traffic

occurs, and what additional night-time noise is generated by the site.

This (omissions) is consistent with the approach in respect of noise more generally where there is

scant regard for the impact that the development might have on noise generation. In the Noise

Assessment, there are few references to ‘transport’, mainly to the make the point that noise levels

have dropped as a result of COVID-19. Noise is mainly considered in respect of the impact of other

sources on the development, not the impact of the development on nearby receptors. The only

exception is the air source heat pumps: ironically, the impact of these on would-be occupants seems

to have been overlooked (see below).

It is very difficult indeed to argue (and perhaps this is why no attempt was made) that the

development will increase night-time noise in the vicinity. This is generally a quiet area at night. The

proposed development has the potential to alter its character significantly in that important regard.

We refer again to DMP 14, to proposed UL2 and other relevant policies in the plan that should

clearly indicate that a development of this density, with the planned-for number of vehicles,

replacing a ‘development’ (is this really brownfield?) which generates little if any night-time noise,

and when it does so, within confined hours.

Affordable Housing

On affordable housing, the same Table under para 5.7 in the Planning Statement notes:

Twenty per cent of the housing is proposed to be affordable. This is in line with Bristol City

Council’s Core Strategy Policy BCS17, and the requirements set out in the Affordable Housing

Practice Note 2018 for proposals in the ‘inner west’ part of the city, responding to the

significant need in Bristol

In the revised application, the Schedule of Accommodation indicates that there will be 11 affordable

apartments in a development of 55 apartments and seven houses, giving a figure not of 20%, but

slightly less than 18%.

BCS17 in the Core Strategy states:

Affordable housing will be required in residential developments of 15 dwellings or more. The

following percentage targets will be sought through negotiation:

• 40% in North West, Inner West and Inner East Bristol;

• 30% in all other locations

The AHPN (Affordable Homes: Practice Note) released in 2018 by Bristol City Council suggested

alternative means of complying with policy on affordable homes:

This new guidance 2018 introduces a ‘threshold’ approach to provide developers with a fast

track route for processing of planning applications if they are prepared to offer at least 20%

on-site affordable housing on sites located in Bristol’s inner west and inner east zones. To

take advantage of this, developers must start work on schemes within 18 months of planning

consent being granted. The Council will still be encouraging developers to deliver policy

compliant 40% affordable housing provision by considering grant applications from

registered providers to make up any shortfall on the Council’s planning policy requirement.

The above Guidance is strange given that the Council is currently falling well short of even the 20%

figure now being offered as a basis for fast-tracking (a lower proportion of) affordable homes, let

alone its own targets in BCS17. The legitimacy of the AHPM must be called into question.

The RDS indicates that, of the 24,669 net dwellings constructed since 2006:

3,557 affordable dwellings (net) were completed comprising 2,441 through housing

association/local authority schemes, plus 1,116 through planning agreements within private

developments.

This amounts to 14.4% of the total.

It is clear (see above regarding the need for new homes) that the Council is well on track to exceed

targets in the Core Strategy for new dwellings: yet it is way off track when it comes to delivering

affordable homes as per the same Core Strategy. The effect of the AHPN – to consent to a 20%

minimum figure, and make this eligible for fast-tracking – is odd, to say the least, not least given the

shortfall in affordable dwellings, and the apparent intention to adopt the affordable homes Policy in

the West of England Draft Spatial Plan (see below).

The point to be made is that in the context of the current performance against the policies in the

Core Strategy, notably BCS17, then the Council should be seeking to maximise contributions to

affordable housing (it does not require a mathematical genius to see that a fast-track process

requiring a minimum threshold of 20% affordable housing is not going to deliver the outcomes

envisaged in BCS17 – indeed, it is actually impossible to do so, and the legitimacy of the AHPN

deserves to be challenged for that reason). Given the current proportion of affordable housing in net

dwellings, the average proportion of affordable dwellings in new dwellings would need to be well

above the 20% target to compensate for the currently low proportion. This is all the more important

given the (in the circumstances, unsurprising) content of developments with planning permission as

of end March 2020 as indicated in the RDS:

Table 6 sets out details of affordable dwellings with planning permission, including dwellings

approved subject to a Section 106 agreement at 31st March 2020. 2,063 dwellings (16.2% of

total net permissions including S106) are affordable.

In passing, and reflecting further on the selective nature of the citations in the Planning Statement, it

is worth noting that, as indicated above, the Planning Statement sought to engender support for its

proposed density of dwellings though reference to (at 6.17-6.19) the Draft Policies and Development

Allocations. The same document indicates, with regard to affordable housing, that:

JSP Policy 3 will become the development plan policy for affordable housing in Bristol when it

is adopted later this year.

The policy on affordable homes being referred to stated (from the West of England JSP (Joint Spatial

Plan)):

On residential developments delivering 5 or more dwellings or sites larger than 0.2ha,

whichever is the lower, a minimum target of 35% Affordable Housing to be delivered on site

is required. This applies to both C3 and self-contained C2 residential developments, including

older persons and student accommodation.

Suffice to say, the current application would be far from compliant with that wording. If the density

of dwellings is to be justified through reference to the Draft Policies and Development Allocations,

then the requirement for affordable homes should be treated in the same way. Furthermore, if the

proposed development seeks to be adjudicated against the DPDA policies, it should say so: the

requirement to pay compensation for above-zero carbon emissions would then, presumably, also

apply (see below).

In short, the application is using selective citation of existing and draft policies to seek to maximise

the number of dwellings, whilst minimizing the number which are affordable.

In any event, the fact that only 11 of 62 dwellings will be affordable places this development below

the 20% figure – the figure is 18% - that would be required for any form of fast-tracking process. It

follows that there must be no fast-tracking of this application.

Mrs Amanda Davis  21 YORK GARDENS   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

I have objected already to the above application - 21/01999/F - but I am writing again to reiterate how strongly I object.

It is not legally possible, contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard the site as previously developed land.

The planned development does not fit in with the landscape and it fails to preserve the character of the Conservation Area of Clifton.

It has been brought to my attention that the Council wishes to avoid the cost of planning appeals making it difficult for local residents to oppose planning applications. I sincerely hope that that is not applicable in this situation.

Yours faithfullyAmanda Davis

Dr Cameron Smith    on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Please note my previous objection is the zoo's application still stands as the new application only makes very minor changes to a scheme that is totally inappropriate for our conservation area

Annette Young  MILTON COURT THE AVENUE   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Please note that my objection to the Zoo's original planning application still stands.

The new application makes only minor changes and does not address the objections which I raised.

In brief the application is fundamentally flawed and totally inappropriate for our Conservation area.

I do hope you will take note of the objections raised and act accordingly.

Annette Young

Rachel Wilson  4 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Dear Sirs

I am writing to object to the latest plans for the redevelopment of the Zoo West car park.The alterations made to the plans are minimal and still are out of keeping with this conservation area. It is sad to see the opportunity for good architecture missed again. The plans as they stand will blight the area and I hope the committee will search longer to find the right use of this site.

Kind regards

Rachel Wilson

Reuben Harford  60 PEMBROKE ROAD   on 2021-08-16   OBJECT

Hello

My name is Reuben Harford and I live at 60 Pembroke road BS8 3DX. I am writing to oppose these revised proposals.

These revised proposals represent the developer's attempt at getting his original proposal through without making much attempt to understand why his original proposal was turned down. The changes made are token changes and minimal in the scale of things.

The buildings density proposed will still be much too great for the site, and completely out of keeping with the rest of Clifton. The spec and the layout of the "affordable housing" are a particularly poor joke.

The application is clearly not previously developed land and, if built, would materially and adversely affect a wide area of Clifton near the Downs.

Please refuse the application in its entirety.

Yours sincerely

Reuben Harford

Mr David Stanley  42 CANYNGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

Second opposition letter to West Car Park Planning Application 21/01999/F

Dear Case Officer,I wish to oppose the latest variation of the Planning Application made by the Zoo to sell off theirWest Car Park for development.There are many comments made by local residents explaining why this site must not beadulterated by a poor architectural design.This area of Clifton has in the most part not been changed by the design of the buildings for wellover 150 years.To allow a design of architecture that will be in total contrast to the beautiful large Villas in CliftonDown (which have Rear gardens nearest to the site and the more modest Terraced buildings onCollege Road nearest to the Zoo West Car Park Site.I wish that my first planning opposition letter is added to this latest one, as I believe thearchitectural changes are not an improvement and in fact solely dictated by maximising the valueof the development and not taking into account the fact that Clifton is a Conservation area wherepotential new builds must be in keeping and add to the area.These revised plans do not add anything to the existing beauty of the old Gothic and Italianatebuildings.In conclusion the latest revisions are not an improvement and I do wish that the City CouncilPlanning Office listen to the opposition commentary made by the residents who have written inand make sure whatever plans are submitted by the Developers are in keeping and able to blendinto the neighbourhood.If some developers can do this then the plans for the College Road Zoo West Car Park cancertainly do so as well.

Mr Bruce Fellows  12 THE PARAGON CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

Having looked at the revised application, I detect little difference. My original objectionsof the 29 June 2021 still stand. This proposed development would foist an eyesore on the currentconservation area and would be a terrible precedent for developments to come on the larger Zoosite.

Mr Paul Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the application.For the purposes of the National Planning Policy Framework the entire site of the BristolZoological Gardens, including its 'car park', should be considered to be a Park. The Bristol TreeForum have objected to the proposals, agreeing that 'this 'car park' is an integral part of the BristolZoo Gardens'. It sits within the setting of 8 listed buildings, including the houses facing on toClifton Down. In 1999 the land to the rear of 4 of these was in use by the Bristol ZoologicalGardens for horticultural and other ancillary uses. The NPPF explicitly excludes from its definitionof previously developed land 'land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestrybuildings'. It is therefore not legally possible, contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard theApplication site as previously developed land. The Application is for high density housingcomprising 55 flats and 7 houses, 62 units in total, with just 45 car parking spaces. Assuming carownership at 1.75 cars per household, some additional 60 vehicles would need to be parked onlocal streets.A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the CliftonPavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped frontgardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves ofthe roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although thearchitecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol.When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the ConservationArea, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have beenprovided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposeddevelopment is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton

ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol,let aloneClifton.As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of theConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden citycharacter wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of thedevelopment, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate.Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absoluteminimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private openspace.

Mrs Wendy Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the application.For the purposes of the National Planning Policy Framework the entire site of the BristolZoological Gardens, including its 'car park', should be considered to be a Park. The Bristol TreeForum have objected to the proposals, agreeing that 'this 'car park' is an integral part of the BristolZoo Gardens'. It sits within the setting of 8 listed buildings, including the houses facing on toClifton Down. In 1999 the land to the rear of 4 of these was in use by the Bristol ZoologicalGardens for horticultural and other ancillary uses. The NPPF explicitly excludes from its definitionof previously developed land 'land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestrybuildings'. It is therefore not legally possible, contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard theApplication site as previously developed land. The Application is for high density housingcomprising 55 flats and 7 houses, 62 units in total, with just 45 car parking spaces. Assuming carownership at 1.75 cars per household, some additional 60 vehicles would need to be parked onlocal streets.A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the CliftonPavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped frontgardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves ofthe roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although thearchitecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol.When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the ConservationArea, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have beenprovided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposeddevelopment is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton

ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol,let aloneClifton.As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of theConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden citycharacter wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of thedevelopment, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate.Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absoluteminimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private openspace.

Mrs Christine Jackson  2 CECIL RD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I wish to object to this schemebecause:1. The development is over intensive.2. The buildings are out of keeping with the surrounding buildings.3. The buildings are too tall and remain so even with the revised plan.4. There is inadequate amenity space.5. This development fails to enhance the Conservation Area and is inappropriate.6. There is inadequate provision for parking for this plan.7. Too few trees.

Mr Richard Adams  8 DOWNFIELD ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

As has been objected to by others, our main concerns with the proposed redevelopmentare listed below.

We believe that all of our objections could fairly easily be incorporated into a revised design whichwould then allow the development to be beneficial for the zoo owners, the local residents and thewider community. We welcome change, but in the right way.

1. Overbearing on street scene. The site is 5 storeys on the College Road side which will dominatethe surrounding houses. If the development was 4 storeys this would be resolved. The building isalso set back less from the road than surrounding houses which will create a domineering feelingto the road. This is also the case from the Cecil Road side with the proposed apartment blockbeing significantly deeper than the surrounding houses. This sets a dangerous precedent for thelarger zoo site that if developed in a similar way would change the nature of the Clifton area.

2. Parking - the proposal includes 45 car parking spaces for 62 units which is not sufficient. Iunderstand the council have stated there will be no RPZ spaces allocated to this development, butwhat guarantees do we have that this will not change? No consideration seems to have beenmade for visitors to this development and where they will park which will provide further pressureon the surrounding area which is already under stress for poor parking with all the multi-let studentproperties.

3. Trees - The development includes the felling of 15+ mature trees. The proposal to replace theseis insufficient and sets a dangerous precedent for the broader zoo site.

Mr Richard Adams  8 DOWNFIELD ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

As has been objected to by others, our main concerns with the proposed redevelopmentare listed below.

We believe that all of our objections could fairly easily be incorporated into a revised design whichwould then allow the development to be beneficial for the zoo owners, the local residents and thewider community. We welcome change, but in the right way.

1. Overbearing on street scene. The site is 5 storeys on the College Road side which will dominatethe surrounding houses. If the development was 4 storeys this would be resolved. The building isalso set back less from the road than surrounding houses which will create a domineering feelingto the road. This is also the case from the Cecil Road side with the proposed apartment blockbeing significantly deeper than the surrounding houses. This sets a dangerous precedent for thelarger zoo site that if developed in a similar way would change the nature of the Clifton area.

2. Parking - the proposal includes 45 car parking spaces for 62 units which is not sufficient. Iunderstand the council have stated there will be no RPZ spaces allocated to this development, butwhat guarantees do we have that this will not change? No consideration seems to have beenmade for visitors to this development and where they will park which will provide further pressureon the surrounding area which is already under stress for poor parking with all the multi-let studentproperties.

3. Trees - The development includes the felling of 15+ mature trees. The proposal to replace theseis insufficient and sets a dangerous precedent for the broader zoo site.

Mr Geoffrey Clements  2 LITFIELD PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

The renewed application differs little from the previous one, and is subject to the sameobjections - unsympathetic to the neighbouring properties, out of scale, and likely to cause traffic/parking problemd

Mr Paul Nigel Rowe  6 DOWNFIELD ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

This plan is totally out of keeping with the Victorian flavour of this part of Clifton. Exitfrom College Road to Upper Belgrave Road is already difficult and hazardous and this will getworse with the increase in traffic caused by the development.The development is too dense and atleast one storey too high.There should be a planting scheme between any development andCollege Road.

Miss Rebecca Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the application.For the purposes of the National Planning Policy Framework the entire site of the BristolZoological Gardens, including its 'car park', should be considered to be a Park. The Bristol TreeForum have objected to the proposals, agreeing that 'this 'car park' is an integral part of the BristolZoo Gardens'. It sits within the setting of 8 listed buildings, including the houses facing on toClifton Down. In 1999 the land to the rear of 4 of these was in use by the Bristol ZoologicalGardens for horticultural and other ancillary uses. The NPPF explicitly excludes from its definitionof previously developed land 'land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestrybuildings'. It is therefore not legally possible, contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard theApplication site as previously developed land. The Application is for high density housingcomprising 55 flats and 7 houses, 62 units in total, with just 45 car parking spaces. Assuming carownership at 1.75 cars per household, some additional 60 vehicles would need to be parked onlocal streets.A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the CliftonPavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped frontgardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves ofthe roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although thearchitecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol.When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the ConservationArea, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have beenprovided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposeddevelopment is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton

ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol,let aloneClifton.As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of theConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden citycharacter wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of thedevelopment, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate.Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absoluteminimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private openspace.

Mr Robert Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the application.For the purposes of the National Planning Policy Framework the entire site of the BristolZoological Gardens, including its 'car park', should be considered to be a Park. The Bristol TreeForum have objected to the proposals, agreeing that 'this 'car park' is an integral part of the BristolZoo Gardens'. It sits within the setting of 8 listed buildings, including the houses facing on toClifton Down. In 1999 the land to the rear of 4 of these was in use by the Bristol ZoologicalGardens for horticultural and other ancillary uses. The NPPF explicitly excludes from its definitionof previously developed land 'land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestrybuildings'. It is therefore not legally possible, contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard theApplication site as previously developed land. The Application is for high density housingcomprising 55 flats and 7 houses, 62 units in total, with just 45 car parking spaces. Assuming carownership at 1.75 cars per household, some additional 60 vehicles would need to be parked onlocal streets.A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the CliftonPavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped frontgardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves ofthe roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although thearchitecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol.When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the ConservationArea, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have beenprovided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposeddevelopment is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton

ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol,let aloneClifton.As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of theConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden citycharacter wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of thedevelopment, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate.Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absoluteminimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private openspace.

Dr Bob Reeves  GARDEN FLAT 8 PRINCES BUILDINGS BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I wish to oppose this application. The plan is to develop the site in a way that is totallyout of keeping with the surrounding neighbourhood. It is disappointing that the zoo directors seemhappy to maximise the income from sale of this site, without consideration for what they leavebehind.Specific reasons for objection--Too many units in the plan. The reduction from 65 to 62 is risible.-Not enough affordable housing.-Not enough car parking built into the scheme. Assuming the owners have one car per unit, wherewill 17 cars find space to park, knowing that all of Clifton has a problem?-The scheme does not have enough open space built into it, as a result of the density of thebuilding.-The design lacks imagination, and has no architectural merit, in a part of Bristol which is full ofinteresting and well-designed properties.

Ms Susan Brierley  12 THE PARAGON CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

This revised application seems little different to the first. It's too high, too big for thespace and very unsympathetic to the area - a conversation area, too. My objections submitted on30th June still stand and this objection is to support my earlier one.

Mr Brian Carr  56 PEMBROKE ROAD CLIFTON  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I have read the revised variation of the original Planning Application. Since the changessuggested are relatively minor I continue to object to this scheme for the reasons set out in myprevious comments made on 24 June 2021, which are repeated below:

Comments for Planning Application 21/01999/FApplication SummaryApplication Number: 21/01999/FAddress: Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol BS8 3HXProposal: Erection of 65 dwellings with associated parking, new vehicular access, and associatedinfrastructure and landscaping.Case Officer: Peter WestburyCustomer DetailsName: Mr Brian Carr Address: Clifton Down BristolComment DetailsCommenter Type: NeighbourStance: Customer objects to the Planning ApplicationComment Reasons:Comment:I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:1. The current proposals would result in an over-development of the site2. 65 dwellings on this site is too many and the height of Block A should be reduced by at leastone storey. Also its design is not in keeping with the existing buildings in College Road and otherbuildings in the vicinity3. The current proposals fail to preserve the character of the Clifton Conservation area and theplan is not consistent with the Zoo's stated vision ' to respond sensitively to the setting and context

of the site'4. The parking provision is inadequate and the proposed access could result in traffic issues5 There is insufficient amenity space and attractive green landscaping

Mrs Linda Carr  56 PEMBROKE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I have read the revised variation of the original Planning Application. Since the changessuggested are relatively minor I continue to object to this scheme for the reasons set out in myprevious comments made on 24 June 2021. Please refer to those comments.

Mr John Hatton  4 NORTHCOTE ROAD   on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

Considering that the revised proposed plans have only been modified minimally from the previous original plans, my objections and misgivings remain much the same as stated some weeks ago.

Of the several uncomfortable strands to the proposals, two stand out in particular: a) the sheer size of the main building, and b) the scope of the entire project on such a correspondingly limited area.

This seems to be an over-intensive development for the existing land area with high density housing as the dominant feature. My sources indicate that having half the number of dwellings in the scheme would correspond more realistically and sympathetically in this Conservation Area. This is crucial, not only for the sake of the present residents of this area but equally so for a smaller number of new incoming dwellers. The proposed plan packs them high in the main gargantuan structure. It also confronts College Road abruptly and rather brutally, and offers precious little breathing space, other than in the car parking area. It is a high urban density by most comparisons in this city and in this general area..

Parking: My calculations predict a basic need for roughly 100 cars for new residents. The plans indicate 45 car parking spaces on site. The overflow onto surrounding roads will clearly be overwhelming, choking this suburb which is already struggling for on-road parking, even with the RPZ in effect - which is often abused, apparently.

I am well aware that the plan considers this area to be a 'brownfield' site, but this is most probably debatable. In this respect, I would look to the Bristol Tree Forum and take my cue from them, considering this to be an extension of parkland, rather than

'brownfield', which was used, previously, as developed land. It would be a shocking disaster to witness the unnecessary demise of mature trees which is envisioned, as well as to experience the substantial influx of humanity.

The "handsomest suburb in Europe" will take quite a hit from the extensive scope of this plan as it presently stands.

John Hatton

David Wells  34 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam,

I wish to object to the revised Planning application.-

1) The proposed massive Block A of high density homes is totally out of keeping with the area and the neighbouring terrace of houses. It would be an overpowering block. The proposed development is over-intensive and too tall.

2) The poor design is not compatible with the surrounding buildings and this Conservation area. The objective should be to maintain or enhance the character of this Conservation area.

2) Access to the new site should be, as now, from College Road. This point of access has worked for many years. It will help to achieve the redesign required by points (1) and (2) above and it will avoid the many traffic and community problems that would arise if access is from Cecil Road.

3) The density of homes proposed is inappropriate for this area and would set a bad precedent for the future redevelopment of the zoo site.

4) Enforcing point (3) above, the assumption of 45 cars and car parking for 62 homes seems unrealistic. We think the number of cars and traffic impact on the area would be much higher from so many homes and a real problem for the area and student/resident safety.

5) The proposal has inadequate amenity space and reduces the number of mature

trees.

For the above reasons this planning application should be refused.

Regards,

David Wells

Patricia Wells  34 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I wish to object to the revised Proposal on the following grounds:

1. The development is over intensive with inadequate car parking and amenity areas.The height of the building on College Road is higher than the Victorian houses next door and the design is not at all in line with a conservation area.

2.. Will cause a large increase of traffic in Cecil and College Road therefore causing higher levels of pollution in the area.

3. A number of mature trees will be lost which is great cause for concern.

The proposal should be refused..

Patricia Wells

Mr Andrew Paten  6 NORTHCOTE ROAD   on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

To whom it may concern I object to the latest application for development as it remains unsympathetic to the area, especially in terms of buildings height and density of occupation.

Andrew Paten

Dr D Shapland  20 WATERLOO STREET   on 2021-08-15   OBJECT

I feel that this greedy over development proposal is a gross infringement in this conservation area which unfortunately will meet the low standards we have come to expect from Bristol Planning Department and its officers.Situated among some of the most elegant and expensive housing in Bristol, most of which is in single occupancy, and to inflict it upon those living nearby also those of us who cherish what there is which makes Clifton unique is tantamount to a criminal act.This being only a small portion of the proposed development of the Bristol Zoo site it does not bode well regarding future planning applications because, if allowed, precedence will have been set for ultra high density residential building on the rest of the Zoo site which will become a blot on the Clifton landscape.The planning department needs to man up and totally resist this application taking it to appeal and beyond if necessary. If they feel they cannot do so they should resign and let others with more backbone take their place.

Dr. D. Shapland,

Dr Inthea Macquire-Samson  6, DOWNFIELD ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-14   OBJECT

I am very against this proposed development of the Bristol Zoo's west car park. To startwith the planned buildings are too high and extremely ugly and not at all in keeping with thesurrounding Victorian architecture. Secondly far too many dwellings are being crammed into thelimited area with the resulting lack of any appreciable garden spaces. The site will not be able tomanage the increase in traffic and required parking spaces. The proposals do not preserve thecharacter of this Conservation area of Clifton. In my opinion the architects have designedsomething which is totally inappropriate and their plans should be binned immediately!

Mrs Sandra McLennan  BROOKSIDE RICKFORD, BURRINGTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-14   OBJECT

As an owner of a flat in College Road and having worked for many years in Clifton I feelstrongly that this application is over-development of the site.

As the zoo's latest planning application is virtually the same as the original, with only minorchanges, my original objection still stands.

Mr Michael McLennan  BROOKSIDE RICKFORD, BURRINGTON NORTH SOMERSET  on 2021-08-14   OBJECT

As joint owner with my wife of a flat in College Road, I feel strongly that this latestapplication is still over-development of the site.

As the zoo's latest planning application is virtually the same as the original, with only minorchanges, my original objection still stands.

Dr Antony Vallance  2 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-14   OBJECT

Dear sir/ madam,

I would like to object to the above proposed development.

My concerns are;

The design is out of keeping and unimaginative in a Conservation area.The whole of the zoo gardens and carpark development proposals should be considered as one.The density, height and scale fail to preserve the local character of this area of Bristol.The loss of a local and popular amenity to housing.The extra car parking required on the adjacent streets coupled with potentially more parking again with the zoo garden site (as yet unknown).I feel the attractive wall on College Road should be retained with access to this development off College Road and not Cecil Road.

Many thanks for the opportunity to comment.

Yours faithfully,

Antony Vallance

Dr Cameron Kennedy  16 SION HILL CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Although I am a supporter of the Bristol Zoo, I am very disappointed by the proposalsput forward for the West Car Park site.1. The density of housing units, even with the revised reduction to 62 from 65, is still much toohigh.2. Coupled with this, the provision of only 45 parking places is too small. Comparable to those whoplan new hospitals - never enough beds, based on unrealistic premises, the notion that theoccupants in the new houses will forgo having cars because of the meagre provision of parking iswishful thinking. The cars that cannot be accommodated on site will add to those on thesurrounding streets, to the aggravation of current residents.3. The designs presented are neither in close sympathy with the nearby buildings nor are theyimaginative but different - as is the case with the extension to St. George's. Even with the revisedlower height of the block on College Road, this structure is much too close to the road, has afacade that is not in keeping with its neighbours and will still create an oppressive feel. Some newbuildings nearby such as 46 / 48 Canynge Road harmonise with their surroundings; much of theproposed scheme, especially block A, does not.4. At present the trees and space within the site give it an open character which integrates with thesurrounding areas. This will be lost by the density of the proposal.5. Affordable housing is included, but the provision per unit is mean.Overall, this is a scheme that does no credit to Bristol Zoo, does not achieve what should be for aconservation area, and shoukd be rejected.

Mr Nick Humphries  57 OLD PARK ROAD CLEVEDON  on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

The proposed changes have not made me change my mind from my previouscomment. I feel that this development is inappropriate for such a prime site, and is out of characterfor the Conservation Area in which it is located.The site will be over developed, with little provision for onsite parking, which will have adetrimental effect on the available parking in the surrounding area.

Dr Ros Kennedy  16 SION HILL CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I still object to this planning application. The size and style of buildings do not fit in withthe local area. Clifton is an important conservation area and this development would change thispart of Clifton. The number of parking spaces is completely unrealistic for the planned number offlats, and the total number of flats is much too great for this site anyway.I am very aware that Bristol needs more housing but this is not the way to do it. We also needaffaordable housoing, but these are small and mean with minimal size of living space.I strongly advise the council to reject this application.

Mrs Philippa Morgan  24 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I am objecting on a number of grounds:

- The number of dwellings is still too great.- The scale and density of the buildings are not in keeping with their surroundings.- The block of flats is particularly inappropriate architecturally.- the proposed development will have a deleterious effect upon the Conservation area- The loss of trees is especially concerning given the Zoo's wish to be environmentally responsible- The development will lead to parking problems.

Celestine Munden  61 CRANBROOK ROAD   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mr Brian Hanson  58 ALMA ROAD   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Dear Sir or Madam

I understand there have been minor revisions to the above scheme which make no material difference to the original scheme and therefore I wish to reconfirm my objection.

The principle of over development of an important site within a Conservation Area has still been completely ignored. The design has no synergy with the surrounding buildings or the greater Clifton area. There is inadequate on-site parking and the additional vehicles of the development's residents will only exacerbate currently restricted parking on the surrounding roads.

It is appalling that the Zoo is showing no regard for what is part of an important and historic site. While appreciating that the trustees have an obligation to maximise revenue that could be achieved by opening the design to competition whereby a scheme could be picked that met good design practice and also produced a high value.

Please re-register my objection.

Yours faithfully

Brian Hanson CBE FRICS

Gillian Woodman-Smith  40 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Further to my previous objection to the scheme for Bristol zoo car park west, I continue to hold the view as stated before, and that the minor "modifications" to the design do nothing to address its poor architectural quality. It would offer its residents a poor quality environment, particularly the so- called low cost flats, hard up against the road and with no outside space whatsoever.The materials are a dreadful hotch potch which in no way resemble the make- up of the local houses and the density of the scheme verges on the inhuman.Gillian Woodman-Smith

  38 DUCHESS WAY   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  74 LISKEARD ROAD   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  THE SHRUBBERY FRENCHAY HILL   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  THE SHRUBBERY FRENCHAY HILL   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  THE SHRUBBERY FRENCHAY HILL   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  74 LISKEARD ROAD   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  8 EARLSTONE CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  47GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mr Tom Clithroe  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Micheala Lougue  7 GLANBRYDON AVENUE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Holly Windows  7 GLANBRYDON AVENUE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Marie Evans  139 OLD STREET   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Glenda Doddimead  130 CHURCH ROAD   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Gill Ball  39 ROCK AVENUE   on 2021-08-13   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mrs RoseMary Musgrave  GARDEN FLAT, 4 EATON CRESCENT CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

I find it ironic that the Zoo is moving so that the animals can have more space and abetter environment but have put in an application for a cramped environment for people, some ofwhom will have no private outdoor area - not even a balcony.

In my letter of 21stJune I wrote: 'Many of those who support the application live outside Bristol andsome say that they have been connected with the Zoo in a capacity such as a trustee. Of the 25letters of support: 3 had no text shown. Ten made no mention of the proposed buildings. Tenthought the proposed buildings would be appropriate. Two went into more detail about the Zoomoving but not about the plans. This application is for a specific development on the site thereforethe twelve that do not comment on the proposed buildings are not relevant and should bediscounted'At that date there were 58 letters opposing the plan. Between 21st June and 10th August therehave been three more letters of support and 197 opposing either the original plans or the revisedones. This means that just over 90% of those who have sent online letters object to the currentapplication. These are not all from residents in the immediate locality but come from other areasas well, which shows the concern of people that if the site is to be for residential use, then it shouldbe an attractive one fitting to its surroundings.

I am objecting to the application for the following reasons:

1. The density of the housing, the height of the blocks of flats and, the lack of open space.

2. The site is in the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area and in no way does the design of theblocks of flats enhance the area nor blend in with adjacent houses many of which are listed. The

small revisions to the original application make insignificant difference to this.

3. The proposed provision for parking is inadequate. It is not acceptable that a new developmentdoes not provide at least the same number of parking spaces as dwellings. Residents may be ableto walk, go on two wheels or use public transport to go to and from a place of work but most willwant a vehicle for leisure pursuits.

4. The detailed survey by the Tree Forum shows the lack of concern by the architects toincorporate many of the trees into their plans - they are to be felled.5. I appreciate that the Zoo needs funds but feel strongly that this site and the main site should belooked at together. They are complementary now and could be in the future.

Mr Justin Jones  GARDEN FLAT, 50 COLLEGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

The latest changes to the Block A proposal actually manage to make the situationworse for my property! While there has been a token reduction in height, Block A has been movedback from College Road, thus making the visual intrusion on our property from the block evenmore obvious.

What makes it worse is that nothing has been done to alleviate the dreadful Soviet-style aestheticsof the block itself. Is Block A and the rest of the West Car Park development really meant toenhance what is a conservation area and a garden suburb? It's not much of a legacy for the zoo toleave behind but it's something their former neighbours will be stuck with for a long time.

Mrs Alexander Brennan  25 STATION ROAD LLANGYNWYD MAESTEG  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

The development involves cutting down trees, erecting a very ugly building blockinglight for residents and encouraging even more traffic congestion to the area- there are better usesbeing put forward for the site.

Dr Joy Main  2 RODNEY COTTAGES, CLIFTON DOWN ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

How is it that Bristol Zoo can contemplate leaving, as its legacy to the community ofwhich it has been a part for the past 185 years, a development as inappropriate to ourconservation area as that currently proposed? Surely they must understand that profitmaximisation is not the only driver they should use, in shaping the buildings they leave behind?How can they be content to leave such a crowded development with such an 'incongruous layoutand form*', 'completely alien and inappropriate architectural language*', and such an egregiouslack of parking provision, given the current parking difficulties experienced by residents?

Michael Woodman Smith, in his appraisal of the Zoo's scheme on behalf of local residents'groups*, asserts that, because some of the land comprising the west car park was formerly usedfor horticultural purposes, it is, in the NPPF's framework, 'land that is or has been occupied byagricultural or forestry buildings', and therefore, contrary to the assertion of the planning applicant,it is not legally possible to regard the site as previously developed land. He states that the west carpark needs to be regarded as integral to the park comprised by Bristol Zoological Gardens.

The proposed block of flats facing onto College Road has effectively no front garden, its eaves are3 metres higher than the parapet level of the houses adjacent, and the high density of proposeddevelopment is 'probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let alone Clifton*'. The recentchanges are effectively meaningless as modifications.

To quote again, 'the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of our conservation area, asrequired by Planning Policy and Planning Law*'.

Ref: 'Bristol Zoological Park - Development Proposals for the Western Car Park 21/01999/F -

Summary scheme Appraisal for Local Residents' Groups, by Michael Woodman Smith.

Dr Joy Main  2 RODNEY COTTAGES, CLIFTON DOWN ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

How is it that Bristol Zoo can contemplate leaving, as its legacy to the community ofwhich it has been a part for the past 185 years, a development as inappropriate to ourconservation area as that currently proposed? Surely they must understand that profitmaximisation is not the only driver they should use, in shaping the buildings they leave behind?How can they be content to leave such a crowded development with such an 'incongruous layoutand form*', 'completely alien and inappropriate architectural language*', and such an egregiouslack of parking provision, given the current parking difficulties experienced by residents?

Michael Woodman Smith, in his appraisal of the Zoo's scheme on behalf of local residents'groups*, asserts that, because some of the land comprising the west car park was formerly usedfor horticultural purposes, it is, in the NPPF's framework, 'land that is or has been occupied byagricultural or forestry buildings', and therefore, contrary to the assertion of the planning applicant,it is not legally possible to regard the site as previously developed land. He states that the west carpark needs to be regarded as integral to the park comprised by Bristol Zoological Gardens.

The proposed block of flats facing onto College Road has effectively no front garden, its eaves are3 metres higher than the parapet level of the houses adjacent, and the high density of proposeddevelopment is 'probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let alone Clifton*'. The recentchanges are effectively meaningless as modifications.

To quote again, 'the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of our conservation area, asrequired by Planning Policy and Planning Law*'.

Ref: 'Bristol Zoological Park - Development Proposals for the Western Car Park 21/01999/F -

Summary scheme Appraisal for Local Residents' Groups, by Michael Woodman Smith.

Mrs Pauline Butcher  25 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

Objection to the revised development plans for the following reasons:- it's still over intensive- it's out of keeping with the conservation area and existing historic buildings- the buildings are too tall- insufficient individual garden areas and/or a community 'town garden'- destruction of existing mature trees.

Any proposed development of the Zoo's West car park area needs to reflect the historic legacy ofthe Zoo Gardens, with a high proportion of green space, gardens and trees.

The revised development plan fails to preserve the character of Clifton's leafy green ambiance,historic buildings and Clifton's Conservation Area.

Mr Brian Worthington  85C PEMBROKE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

The revised proposals present minimal changes to the previous plan and are stillunacceptable in terms of too great mass, obtrusive space and a style entirely wrong for thecharacter of this historic setting.

M Jones  144 MILL VIEW   on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

I have read with great alarm the proposed plans for erection of 65 dwellings with associated parking, new vehicular access, and associated infrastructure and landscaping/Former Car Park College Road Bristol.

Over the years I have been a visitor to the Zoo and surrounding areas, this proposal will really ruin this area without the impact on the surrounding properties. An immense change to residents in that area.

M Jones

Simon Dunsterville  26 CLIFTON PARK ROAD   on 2021-08-12   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,I write to lodge my complaint about this scheme put forward by Bristol Zoo.The application is for much too dense housing without nearly enough parking allocated. The area of each flat is the absolute minimum allowed by law, the ground floor flats open straight onto the street (Clifton Park), the height of the block of flats is much higher than the present street highest level, the quality of building is vastly inferior to the present locality. This proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of this area as required by Planning Policy and Planning Law.This whole site is NOT "previously developed land" but "agricultural buildings and land" and therefore not eligible for the purposes planned.Please reject this planning accordingly.

Mrs Yvonne Barrett  THE MAISONETTE 4 CECIL ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

The latest planning application is virtually the same as the original. I objected to theoriginal application and my first set of comments still stand.

In addition, I have since discovered that the proposed site is not previously developed land andthe proposal may therefore be illegal.

It is assumed that car ownership can be estimated at 1.75 cars per household. This will lead to anadditional 60 vehicles needing to be parked on local streets. This will clog up traffic flow,particularly if the site entrance is to be in Cecil Road, a quite unnecessary and ridiculoussuggestion.

The proposal fails miserably to preserve the character of the Conservation Area as required byPlanning Policy and by Planning Law.

Mr David Barrett  THE MAISONETTE 4 CECIL ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

As the latest planning application is virtually the same as the original, with only a fewpaltry changes, my original objection still stands.

In addition, I have since discovered that the proposed site is not previously developed land andthe proposal may therefore be illegal.

It is assumed that car ownership can be estimated at 1.75 cars per household. This will lead to anadditional 60 vehicles needing to be parked on local streets. This will clog up traffic flow,particularly if the site entrance is to be in Cecil Road, a quite unnecessary and ridiculoussuggestion. The present entrance and exit onto College Road have always been effective andshould be retained from the point of view of safety and efficient traffic flow.

The proposal fails miserably to preserve the character of the Conservation Area as required byPlanning Policy and by Planning Law. It represents over development on a massive scale and thedesign is not conducive to retaining the appearance that the people of Bristol have always enjoyedwhen visiting this area of Clifton.

Mrs Yvonne Barrett  THE MAISONETTE 4 CECIL ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

The latest planning application is virtually the same as the original. I objected to theoriginal application and my first set of comments still stand.

In addition, I have since discovered that the proposed site is not previously developed land andthe proposal may therefore be illegal.

It is assumed that car ownership can be estimated at 1.75 cars per household. This will lead to anadditional 60 vehicles needing to be parked on local streets. This will clog up traffic flow,particularly if the site entrance is to be in Cecil Road, a quite unnecessary and ridiculoussuggestion.

The proposal fails miserably to preserve the character of the Conservation Area as required byPlanning Policy and by Planning Law.

Dee Bidwell  8 EARLSTONE CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Lily Thorpe  74 LISKEARD ROAD   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Stephanie Armour  PIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Nicki Armour  PIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mr Stephen Parker  38 DUCHESS WAY   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Jamie Martin  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

K Telfor-Bennett  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Cam Littlejohn  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mr Dan Jones  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Sam Wellsman  47 GWYDR CRESCENT   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Marina Milner  117 PEMBROKE ROAD   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I understand that the above application has been revised. I would like to lodge my objection to these new proposals too, please, on the grounds that they are still high density and not in keeping with the style of the street.

Yours faithfully

Marina Milner

Paula Grant  THE SHRUBBERY   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the followinggrounds - Overdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems(only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads andservices. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend withexisting local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in aconservation area. The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking outof keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to thearea as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when thecouncil's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit ofall. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve aconservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristolwhich would adversely affect current and future populations.

  SOMERSET COTTAGE SOMERSET STREET   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

  SOMERSET COTTAGE SOMERSET STREET   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

  2 NORLAND ROAD   on 2021-08-11   OBJECT

Mr Axel Nelms  9 CLIFTON CLOSE CLIFTON BRIDTOL  on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

I have updated the objection that I lodged against the first public version of the plans -April 2021 - in the light of the latest revision (fall back 01?) - July 2021. Please take this as myobjection to the plan as revised.

I particularly noticed the top floor change to Block A. My reading is that this has been achieved bythe 2 Bed Types i, ii and iii in Block A being made smaller, and total units in the same block beingreduced by 3.

____________________________________________

Detail:Block A Three fewer units (1x 3F Type i deleted, 1x 3F Type i moved to Type ii; 4F 2x Type iiideleted, 1x 3 Bed moved to 2 Bed Type ii, 2x GF Type iii moved to Type ii)

Block B - unchanged apart from the revamp of flat 44 (Totals of 1 Bed presumably 4 rather than 2shown on 30418_-_WEST_CAR_PARK_-_AS-01-P2_-_SCHEDULE_OF_ACCOMMODATION-2999949.pdf)

Mews - unchanged____________________________________________

I have added to my previous objection using [square brackets].

As a nearby resident I wish to object to this application. [Still stands.]

To me the mock-up of the dominant building in the proposal (Design Access Statement Pages 90-91) gives the impression of a blueprint calibrated to maximise the profit of the developers, withlittle weight given to long term liveability. The details in the application confirm this. An example isthe intention to create 58 flats, with only 35 car parking spaces between them. The shortcomingsare not countered by any of the lipstick-on-a-pig embellishments. Day-to-day deliveries,maintenance call-outs, visitors, car cleaning and waste collection will struggle with the crampedlayout. Over the years Clifton has absorbed space-limited infills, typically of 4-5 units or fewer, buta hit of 65 units in one plot is way OTT.[Although the number of flats has reduced to 55, and so the number of units to 62, my commentstill stands. The planting frontage to Block A is still mean. To me the change in the top floors doesnot change the uninspiring appearance of the block. There is nothing that one would want to copyelsewhere.]

I agree with other public comments that the scheme exemplifies over-development, and wouldsignificantly detract from the setting of the surrounding listed buildings. Setting aside anyaspiration for a Pevsner to be able to enthuse over 'a perfect piece of architecture', a much betterdesign, commanding some admiration now, and in the future, would not come amiss.[Still stands.]

Without questioning the worthy causes to which the sales value will be applied, giving approval tothis site's development independently of a plan for the main site is rather like trying for a quick winby selling off the original frame of an old master painting without considering the future of thewhole composition. Planning consent at this stage would, in effect, prejudge options for the mainsite.[Still stands.]

In the light of the above please refuse the application.[Still stands.]

Mr Adam Chivers  FELIXSTOWE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD CLIFTON, BRISTOL  on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

I maintain my objections to the very slightly amended scheme. The minor adjustmentsare insignificant - reducing the number of dwellings by just 3 whilst the unsightly block on CollegeRoad is only marginally altered and the entrance via Cecil Road remains.The new proposals replicate what has been correctly described as the 'totalitarian' or 'Easternbloc' or 'Communist era' nature of the earlier scheme. Sadly, as has been the case throughout, theapplicants have ignored the legitimate concerns of the objectors and, in their concern to maximisetheir commercial return to the exclusion of all other public benefit considerations, demonstrated asurprising ignorance of their duties as trustees. it is abundantly clear for the reasons explained bythe many, many objectors that the proposals, whether in their original or amended form, utterly failto preserve the character of the Conservation Area.

Moreover, it has now emerged that the land in question site may not be a brownfield site at all.This requires proper investigation.

My earlier objections remain:

The scheme for which the Zooseeks approval is wholly inconsistent with the basic principles of conservation. As Historic Englandhas noted in its submissions, the National Planning Policy framework defines 'conservation' as 'theprocess of maintaining and managing change to a heritage asset in a way that sustains and,where appropriate, enhances its significance.' The scheme comes nowhere near satisfying thatbasic principle.

There are well over 200 people objecting to the scheme - some 95% or so of those who have

made submissions. The proportion would be greater if the Zoo had not inflated the numbers infavour by ensuring that certain of its directors made submissions in support (without indicatingeither their status or that they had an obvious interest in the success of the application).

In essence, the objectors make the same or similar points in complaining about the scheme. It canbe no coincidence that so many people have reached the same conclusions nor that, crucially,their objections are reinforced in the recent submissions of Historic England.

Helpfully, Historic England has drawn attention to the 'combination of formal Gothic architectureand mature planting [that] are an essential focus of this part of the conservation area [and the]liberal use of rubble limestone and Bathstone dressings on both building and walls [that] alsopredominates and [so] creates a consistency between buildings and their settings.' The proposalsmake no concessions whatsoever to this highly relevant context in which the development isproposed - a unique Conservation Area of national significance.

The common features of the huge number of objections are these:

1. The proposals constitute over intensive development. In the words of Historic England, 'theproposed layout, massing and design fails to respond to the character and appearance of theConservation Area'.

2. The buildings are too tall, especially those proposed on College Road and are out of keepingwith surrounding buildings. As Historic England puts it, '[the] robust rhythm of weighty Victorianvillas, constructed predominantly from dressed rubble and Bath stone detailing, is certainly theoverriding built form and the concept of a terraced approach of this scale alongside the existingshort terrace is of considerable concern.'

3. The poor design and over-massing would damage the settings of surrounding buildings.

4. The parking provision is hopelessly inadequate.

5. Amenity space is inadequate.

6. A significant number of trees would be lost.

7. There is no conservation merit in creating a vehicular entrance to the site from Cecil Road whenthere already exists a perfectly satisfactory entrance from College Road.

8. The proposals fail altogether to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Infact, they would do the opposite: significant damage.

We agree with all these objections. The applicants have made no attempt to ensure that the

scheme is appropriate for the Conservation Area. As Historic England has explained, 'While theexisting car park does not contribute positively to the Conservation Area, its open aspect andenclosure behind the high stone wall of College Road is indicative of the juxtaposition of rows ofsubstantial villas against substantial, open spaces'.

The proposals should at the very least have taken notice of the positive contribution to theConservation Area of this wall and the need to comply with the Conservation Area Appraisal, bothof which Historic England has emphasised. As it has explained: 'If development were to be furtherset back into the site, the impact of the development could be reduced and the boundary wallcould be retained in a more meaningful and contextual way.'

There is a further matter of concern. On their website, the Zoo claims that 'We have been througha very rigorous process to explore a number of options as well as taking independent professionaladvice from a range of sources to ensure we are taking the best possible course of action for theSociety's future.' It maintains that 'As part of our extensive review in 2020, we explored otheroptions for the Clifton site, which included other types of visitor attraction and other types of zoos.Working with professional advisors we do not believe that any will be viable or sustainable overthe long-term on the Clifton site.'

It has not however made public the other options that it considered.

The reason for this lack of transparency has to be a matter of conjecture but one possible reasonmay be apparent from a letter which its Chief Executive wrote on 8 April to those who respondedto its initial proposal in which he stated that 'As the Society is a charity, the Trustees are legallyrequired to obtain maximum value from the charity's assets to reinvest in its charitableobjectives...'

That, regrettably, is a misconception. It takes no account of the obligation to ensure that indischarge of its charitable purposes the trustees pay appropriate regard to the overriding need toensure a public benefit of its activities. It is clear that the trustees are instead determined simplyand solely to maximise the development potential of the site to the wholesale exclusion of anyother considerations. The failure to appreciate, let alone give effect to, their wider social andfiduciary responsibilities is concerning.

In their submissions, Historic England conclude that 'your authority would be justified inrecommending ... refusal'. They ask that 'the applicants ... bring forward a wider masterplan for thesite to allow [the] proposals to be considered in a wider context.'We ask that in their present form the proposals be rejected and that the applicants consider amore imaginative scheme for the site that will produce a reasonable commercial return yet payproper respect to the setting of the site in a Conservation Area of national significance.

Mr Adam Chivers  FELIXSTOWE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD CLIFTON, BRISTOL  on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

I maintain my objections to the very slightly amended scheme. The minor adjustmentsare insignificant - reducing the number of dwellings by just 3 whilst the unsightly block on CollegeRoad is only marginally altered and the entrance via Cecil Road remains.The new proposals replicate what has been correctly described as the 'totalitarian' or 'Easternbloc' or 'Communist era' nature of the earlier scheme. Sadly, as has been the case throughout, theapplicants have ignored the legitimate concerns of the objectors and, in their concern to maximisetheir commercial return to the exclusion of all other public benefit considerations, demonstrated asurprising ignorance of their duties as trustees. it is abundantly clear for the reasons explained bythe many, many objectors that the proposals, whether in their original or amended form, utterly failto preserve the character of the Conservation Area.

Moreover, it has now emerged that the land in question site may not be a brownfield site at all.This requires proper investigation.

My earlier objections remain:

The scheme for which the Zooseeks approval is wholly inconsistent with the basic principles of conservation. As Historic Englandhas noted in its submissions, the National Planning Policy framework defines 'conservation' as 'theprocess of maintaining and managing change to a heritage asset in a way that sustains and,where appropriate, enhances its significance.' The scheme comes nowhere near satisfying thatbasic principle.

There are well over 200 people objecting to the scheme - some 95% or so of those who have

made submissions. The proportion would be greater if the Zoo had not inflated the numbers infavour by ensuring that certain of its directors made submissions in support (without indicatingeither their status or that they had an obvious interest in the success of the application).

In essence, the objectors make the same or similar points in complaining about the scheme. It canbe no coincidence that so many people have reached the same conclusions nor that, crucially,their objections are reinforced in the recent submissions of Historic England.

Helpfully, Historic England has drawn attention to the 'combination of formal Gothic architectureand mature planting [that] are an essential focus of this part of the conservation area [and the]liberal use of rubble limestone and Bathstone dressings on both building and walls [that] alsopredominates and [so] creates a consistency between buildings and their settings.' The proposalsmake no concessions whatsoever to this highly relevant context in which the development isproposed - a unique Conservation Area of national significance.

The common features of the huge number of objections are these:

1. The proposals constitute over intensive development. In the words of Historic England, 'theproposed layout, massing and design fails to respond to the character and appearance of theConservation Area'.

2. The buildings are too tall, especially those proposed on College Road and are out of keepingwith surrounding buildings. As Historic England puts it, '[the] robust rhythm of weighty Victorianvillas, constructed predominantly from dressed rubble and Bath stone detailing, is certainly theoverriding built form and the concept of a terraced approach of this scale alongside the existingshort terrace is of considerable concern.'

3. The poor design and over-massing would damage the settings of surrounding buildings.

4. The parking provision is hopelessly inadequate.

5. Amenity space is inadequate.

6. A significant number of trees would be lost.

7. There is no conservation merit in creating a vehicular entrance to the site from Cecil Road whenthere already exists a perfectly satisfactory entrance from College Road.

8. The proposals fail altogether to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Infact, they would do the opposite: significant damage.

We agree with all these objections. The applicants have made no attempt to ensure that the

scheme is appropriate for the Conservation Area. As Historic England has explained, 'While theexisting car park does not contribute positively to the Conservation Area, its open aspect andenclosure behind the high stone wall of College Road is indicative of the juxtaposition of rows ofsubstantial villas against substantial, open spaces'.

The proposals should at the very least have taken notice of the positive contribution to theConservation Area of this wall and the need to comply with the Conservation Area Appraisal, bothof which Historic England has emphasised. As it has explained: 'If development were to be furtherset back into the site, the impact of the development could be reduced and the boundary wallcould be retained in a more meaningful and contextual way.'

There is a further matter of concern. On their website, the Zoo claims that 'We have been througha very rigorous process to explore a number of options as well as taking independent professionaladvice from a range of sources to ensure we are taking the best possible course of action for theSociety's future.' It maintains that 'As part of our extensive review in 2020, we explored otheroptions for the Clifton site, which included other types of visitor attraction and other types of zoos.Working with professional advisors we do not believe that any will be viable or sustainable overthe long-term on the Clifton site.'

It has not however made public the other options that it considered.

The reason for this lack of transparency has to be a matter of conjecture but one possible reasonmay be apparent from a letter which its Chief Executive wrote on 8 April to those who respondedto its initial proposal in which he stated that 'As the Society is a charity, the Trustees are legallyrequired to obtain maximum value from the charity's assets to reinvest in its charitableobjectives...'

That, regrettably, is a misconception. It takes no account of the obligation to ensure that indischarge of its charitable purposes the trustees pay appropriate regard to the overriding need toensure a public benefit of its activities. It is clear that the trustees are instead determined simplyand solely to maximise the development potential of the site to the wholesale exclusion of anyother considerations. The failure to appreciate, let alone give effect to, their wider social andfiduciary responsibilities is concerning.

In their submissions, Historic England conclude that 'your authority would be justified inrecommending ... refusal'. They ask that 'the applicants ... bring forward a wider masterplan for thesite to allow [the] proposals to be considered in a wider context.'We ask that in their present form the proposals be rejected and that the applicants consider amore imaginative scheme for the site that will produce a reasonable commercial return yet payproper respect to the setting of the site in a Conservation Area of national significance.

Mr Adam Chivers  FELIXSTOWE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD CLIFTON, BRISTOL  on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

I maintain my objections to the very slightly amended scheme. The minor adjustmentsare insignificant - reducing the number of dwellings by just 3 whilst the unsightly block on CollegeRoad is only marginally altered and the entrance via Cecil Road remains.The new proposals replicate what has been correctly described as the 'totalitarian' or 'Easternbloc' or 'Communist era' nature of the earlier scheme. Sadly, as has been the case throughout, theapplicants have ignored the legitimate concerns of the objectors and, in their concern to maximisetheir commercial return to the exclusion of all other public benefit considerations, demonstrated asurprising ignorance of their duties as trustees. it is abundantly clear for the reasons explained bythe many, many objectors that the proposals, whether in their original or amended form, utterly failto preserve the character of the Conservation Area.

Moreover, it has now emerged that the land in question site may not be a brownfield site at all.This requires proper investigation.

My earlier objections remain:

The scheme for which the Zooseeks approval is wholly inconsistent with the basic principles of conservation. As Historic Englandhas noted in its submissions, the National Planning Policy framework defines 'conservation' as 'theprocess of maintaining and managing change to a heritage asset in a way that sustains and,where appropriate, enhances its significance.' The scheme comes nowhere near satisfying thatbasic principle.

There are well over 200 people objecting to the scheme - some 95% or so of those who have

made submissions. The proportion would be greater if the Zoo had not inflated the numbers infavour by ensuring that certain of its directors made submissions in support (without indicatingeither their status or that they had an obvious interest in the success of the application).

In essence, the objectors make the same or similar points in complaining about the scheme. It canbe no coincidence that so many people have reached the same conclusions nor that, crucially,their objections are reinforced in the recent submissions of Historic England.

Helpfully, Historic England has drawn attention to the 'combination of formal Gothic architectureand mature planting [that] are an essential focus of this part of the conservation area [and the]liberal use of rubble limestone and Bathstone dressings on both building and walls [that] alsopredominates and [so] creates a consistency between buildings and their settings.' The proposalsmake no concessions whatsoever to this highly relevant context in which the development isproposed - a unique Conservation Area of national significance.

The common features of the huge number of objections are these:

1. The proposals constitute over intensive development. In the words of Historic England, 'theproposed layout, massing and design fails to respond to the character and appearance of theConservation Area'.

2. The buildings are too tall, especially those proposed on College Road and are out of keepingwith surrounding buildings. As Historic England puts it, '[the] robust rhythm of weighty Victorianvillas, constructed predominantly from dressed rubble and Bath stone detailing, is certainly theoverriding built form and the concept of a terraced approach of this scale alongside the existingshort terrace is of considerable concern.'

3. The poor design and over-massing would damage the settings of surrounding buildings.

4. The parking provision is hopelessly inadequate.

5. Amenity space is inadequate.

6. A significant number of trees would be lost.

7. There is no conservation merit in creating a vehicular entrance to the site from Cecil Road whenthere already exists a perfectly satisfactory entrance from College Road.

8. The proposals fail altogether to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Infact, they would do the opposite: significant damage.

We agree with all these objections. The applicants have made no attempt to ensure that the

scheme is appropriate for the Conservation Area. As Historic England has explained, 'While theexisting car park does not contribute positively to the Conservation Area, its open aspect andenclosure behind the high stone wall of College Road is indicative of the juxtaposition of rows ofsubstantial villas against substantial, open spaces'.

The proposals should at the very least have taken notice of the positive contribution to theConservation Area of this wall and the need to comply with the Conservation Area Appraisal, bothof which Historic England has emphasised. As it has explained: 'If development were to be furtherset back into the site, the impact of the development could be reduced and the boundary wallcould be retained in a more meaningful and contextual way.'

There is a further matter of concern. On their website, the Zoo claims that 'We have been througha very rigorous process to explore a number of options as well as taking independent professionaladvice from a range of sources to ensure we are taking the best possible course of action for theSociety's future.' It maintains that 'As part of our extensive review in 2020, we explored otheroptions for the Clifton site, which included other types of visitor attraction and other types of zoos.Working with professional advisors we do not believe that any will be viable or sustainable overthe long-term on the Clifton site.'

It has not however made public the other options that it considered.

The reason for this lack of transparency has to be a matter of conjecture but one possible reasonmay be apparent from a letter which its Chief Executive wrote on 8 April to those who respondedto its initial proposal in which he stated that 'As the Society is a charity, the Trustees are legallyrequired to obtain maximum value from the charity's assets to reinvest in its charitableobjectives...'

That, regrettably, is a misconception. It takes no account of the obligation to ensure that indischarge of its charitable purposes the trustees pay appropriate regard to the overriding need toensure a public benefit of its activities. It is clear that the trustees are instead determined simplyand solely to maximise the development potential of the site to the wholesale exclusion of anyother considerations. The failure to appreciate, let alone give effect to, their wider social andfiduciary responsibilities is concerning.

In their submissions, Historic England conclude that 'your authority would be justified inrecommending ... refusal'. They ask that 'the applicants ... bring forward a wider masterplan for thesite to allow [the] proposals to be considered in a wider context.'We ask that in their present form the proposals be rejected and that the applicants consider amore imaginative scheme for the site that will produce a reasonable commercial return yet payproper respect to the setting of the site in a Conservation Area of national significance.

Mrs F Brealey  THE BRISTOL BAPTIST COLLEGE THE PROMENADE, CLIFTON DOWN, CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

We feel that this new housing development would negatively affect our staff, studentsand visitors. Parking provision is absurdly inadequate. No allowance has been given to familyvisitors or tradesmen on the development unless parking in Cecil Road or along the Promenade isenvisaged. Cecil Road will become a total bottleneck. There are not enough parking spaces withinthe scheme which will then cause parking issues on the adjacent streets, especially: thePromenade, where we are located.

The entrance onto Cecil Road will mean cars accessing what will be single lane traffic. Theproposal will have a detrimental effect on traffic flow. The present access to the site opens ontotwo lane traffic and has been perfectly adequate for decade.It should also be stated that the conservation area would not be preserved or enhanced by theover intensive developmentthat is proposed. There are too many dwellings proposed for the site and the buildings are too tall.Also, plans to remove 15 lovely trees would be a detriment to the area.

The overall size and design of this development is not in keeping with the area, and Block A onCollege Road is ugly, oversized and looks like a city centre block of flats, which definitely shouldnot be built.

Ms CM Sage  7 DOWNFIELD ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

I write to object to the revised scheme. I am a local resident.

My objection is based on:

1. the housing density of the development is exceptionally high and totally inappropriate for the site and wider area 2. the design is unappealing at best, and the proposed construction materials are at odds with the surrounding buildings and streetscape. I cannot see how the design chimes with the character of the Conservation Area in which it is located, and assume therefore that the application seeks for an exception to be made to current planning policy? This should be resisted.3. there is insufficient provision for within-development car parking, with accordingly a high risk of enormous vehicle overspill parking onto already congested streets 4. despite revisions, the proposal sets an unwelcome precedent for high density development for the Zoological site as a whole.

The proposal appears to be led by the commercial need to cram as many units as possible onto the site, at the lowest possible cost in terms of materials and design, in order to make the project stack up for the developers. This should not be permitted to happen in an historic conservation area.

Yours faithfully

Carrie Sage

    on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Jeremy Baines  10 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Sirs,

This is to record our objections to this deplorable planning project. We endorse all the strong criticism sent to you in relation to this application.

Jeremy Baines

  74 LISKEARD ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

    on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  STOCKWELL HOUSE WESTERLEIGH ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  STOCKWELL HOUSE WESTERLEIGH ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Commenter Type: Area resident

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  1 LADLE END LANE WALTON ON TRENT   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  3 BROOKSIDE AVENUE   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  10 CLEEVE LAWNS   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  10 CLEEVE LAWNS   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

  46B FRENCHAY PARK ROAD   on 2021-08-10   OBJECT

Stance: Customer objects to the Planning Application

Comment Reasons:

Comment: I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems (only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), and pressure on local roads and services. Design of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture, important anywhere but particularly in a conservation area.The 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoiling the view for visitors to the area as well as residents. It is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environment for the benefit of all. Overall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents a serious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations.

Mr Andrew MacDowall  5 WORCESTER CRESCENT BRISTOL  on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

I strongly object to this proposal which is little changed from the original proposal that Iobjected to. I entirely concur with the submission from CHIS.

Mrs Rosalind MacDowall  5 WORCESTER CRESCENT CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

I object to the scarcely revised plan for the development. The mass of housing is still fartoo big for the site. The block of flats planned for College Road is out of proportion with the presentbuildings and will create a canyon effect. Those buying the "affordable" housing will still be payingfor living in Clifton but for minimum floor area. Too many dwellings, too few car parking spaces,too little communal space.

Mrs Margaret Howard  FLAT 1, 4 CECIL ROAD, BRISTOL BS8 3HR  on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

I see nothing in the Zoo's latest planning application to make me change my mind. Myoriginal objections still stand.

1. This site is in the Clifton & Hotwells Conservation Area but the design of the building shows noacknowledgement of this. The large prison-like block of flats on College Road, in particular, istotally out of proportion to the rest of the area. The design of the buildings on the site in generalshows no relation to the architecture of the surrounding houses.

2. The entrance to the site should be, as at present, in College Road. Cecil Road is essentially aone-lane road. During the rush hour it is popular as a 'rat run' to avoid the difficult junction ofClifton Down Road and The Promenade. It is also busy, of course, during the - fairly lengthy -'drop-off' and 'pick-up' times of Clifton College and Clifton High School.

3. The number of parking places is still totally inadequate. Even those who are able to cycle or usepublic transport to travel to work will still need a car for shopping or leisure pursuits.

4. The pandemic has proved how important it is for people to have access to their own outdoorspace. The planned over-development of this site, however, shows that this human need has notbeen considered in this proposal.

The application should be rejected.

Miss Victoria Kenny  AVONBANK CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Objection: 21/01999/F - Erection of 65 dwellings with associated parking, new vehicularaccess and associated infrastructure and landscaping.

It is our view that the revised proposals remain to be harmful to the setting of our home which isone of the Listed Buildings that faces Clifton Down. It will result in detriment and harm to thecharacter of the conservation area. The proposed buildings are 33m from our mews house raisingconcerns regarding overlooking, loss of amenity and privacy concerns.

The new application for a total of 62 units appears immaterially different to the original planningapplication, only 45 car parking spaces are planned. With the average number of cars perhousehold In the south west being 1.35 (data from https://www.nimblefins.co.uk/cheap-car-insurance/number-cars-great-britain) therefore there is a shortfall of 39 parking spaces. Theseexclude visitors and therefore will result in the surrounding streets being incredibly congested withparked cars.

The prominent location, massing, size, scale, form and appearance of the development is suchthere will be an adverse effect on the character of the conservation area, the setting of Clifton andthe listed buildings on Clifton Down. Likewise the development with have a detrimental effect onthe outlook from the listed villas and surrounding properties including the Clifton Pavilion.

It is also our view that this development proposes a significant loss of historic fabric that includesbut is not limited to the rear garden wall fronting college road and the outbuilding once within thecurtilage of Avonbank. The loss of these two structures will cause irreparable damage to the streetscene.

The proposed mews houses A will be circa 35m from our property. Avonbank and it's mews enjoya high level of privacy with no dwellings looking directly into habitable rooms or private amenityspace. A series of 3 storey properties will significantly impact that privacy. We note on our ownapplication for planning permission of the Mews house we were restricted to a 2 story height with aflat roof. To allow the development of 3 storey buildings mere meters away shows a significantreversal of the decision made in 2013.

The impact is all the more harmful due to the fact our property Avonbank has no buildings causingany overbearing impact. This proposal will have a significant overbearing impact upon our privategarden harming the amenity of our garden and the mews house.

For these reasons the current application should be refused.

We fully accept the need to find a new future for the land following the closure of the Zoo and donot oppose development in principle but this reapplication still odes not respect the setting of thelisted buildings harming the conservation area.

Mr Mark Jackson  2 CECIL RD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Clifton is as as was once remarked by the Poet laureate "the handsomest suburb inEurope".Bristol Zoo have been an integral part of Clifton over the last 150 years.It is evident however that the car park and attached buildings are not in keeping with aConservation area.I would have hoped that any much needed redevelopment would have been in keeping andsympathetic to the environ of this area.The proposed development is neither and will seriously detract from the Clifton conservation area.The design itself is extremely poor and ill conceived and can be considered to be a massiveblunder both by the architect concerned and Bristol Zoo.It would be unfortunate that the Zoo will leave the site in Clifton with this development which willblight the area over the next 150 years.It is also likely that the proposed development is not legal under NPPF guidelines as this land waspreviously utilised for horticultural purposes.Whilst welcoming thoughtful development of this site to improve the aesthetics of the area, I wouldreiterate that this is NOT the case and the proposed design is totally unacceptable in both scaleand position lacking any imagination or innovation. The density of housing is also substantiallybeyond that recommended for development and is certainly beyond that of the remainder ofClifton.In particular the scale and position of the monolithic block on College Rd is reminiscent ofbrutalistic architecture of the 1970's and is out of keeping with the area.The design needs to settle organically into the area and not to be oversized. Landscaping andpreservation of flora, especially trees are paramount as well as preserving access to light for thesurrounding properties.Similarly the realities of off road car parking have been ignored and further street congestion will

inevitably be bound to follow.I would suggest that the Zoo should abandon the current proposals and engage an innovativearchitect with expertise to produce a sustainable and aesthetic development which will provide alasting and beneficial legacy to the zoo's presence in Clifton.Currently this is not it and the proposed revision remains similarly flawed!

David Burston (Burston Cook)  LEWINS HOUSE NARROW LEWINS MEAD BRISTOL   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam,

I refer to the above application and specifically the amendments made to the original submission. Having considered the revisions I believe my objections submitted on 28th June below are still relevant as the revisions do not meaningfully address the design and massing concerns that I expressed on 28th June. The site is in a Conservation Area and the scheme lacks sensitivity and is inappropriate for such a location.

Yours faithfully,

David Burston FRICSDirectorBurston Cook

Charles Ross  19 OLD SCHOOL LANE   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam

Further to your letter dated 26 July 2021, I wish to object to the revised details you received on the 22 July 2021 regarding the Application No 21/01999/F. My objection is that the revised plans do not address my comments in the email below, which I sent to you on the 28 June 2021.

In short, I oppose the proposed development based on the revised details, because it does not address my original comments

Sincerely

Charles Ross

Comment from 28th June 2021

Dear Sir/Madam

I wish to object to the above proposed development for the following reasons:

:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall - over 4 storeys..c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.

e. The proposed parking provision with only 45 spaces is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

As stated, I oppose the proposed development for the above reasons

Sincerely

Charles Ross

Mr Michael Ward   3 THE AVENUE   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Dear Planners, I wish to object to the revised proposals for development on the Western Car Park portion of the Bristol Zoo site in Clifton. I attach a Summary Scheme Appraisal prepared bylocal residents' groups, which sets out my views very clearly. In summary: 1. The car park is an integral part of the zoo site in the Conservation Area and

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Geraldine Davies  2 GUARDIAN COURT   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Dear Sirs

I write yet again to request you refuse this application. It is totally out of character for the. Clifton Conservation Area and comprises far too many housing units (130% greater density than the rest of the Area apparently) with far too few parking places which will cause untold misery for present residents, their guests and other visitors to the Village.

As the name suggests Bristol Zoological GARDENS is a public amenity and the development should preferably be for the use of locals and tourists to enjoy not for a few householders crammed into a far too small and unsuitable development.

Let's have something that pleases the eye, does not stick out like a sore thumb and will be an asset for the area.

RegardsGeraldine Davies

Rosemary Chamberlin  19 ROWNHAM MEAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Hello

I'd like to add my objections to the new application for the zoo car park. I say 'new' but it is almost exactly the same as the original - still too many homes, still too tall, still out of character with the area. Please throw this out and let's have some sensitively designed homes with sufficient space around them.

Rosemary Chamberlin

Geraldine Badger  21 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Sir/Madam,

I am writing regarding the revised details which were received by the council on 22.7.21. The alterations in the revised application are minor and insignificant. My objections as stated in my e mail of 28.6.21 are unchanged.

Yours sincerely,(Dr) Geraldine Badger

  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  SERRIDGE HOUSE HENFIELD ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  SERRIDGE HOUSE HENFIELD ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  SERRIDGE HOUSE HENFIELD ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

  SERRIDGE HOUSE HENFIELD ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the Clifton Pavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped front gardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves of the roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although the architecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to 'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol. When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the Conservation Area, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have been provided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton. As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

David & Ruth Slinn  AUBURN HOUSE   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

Thank you for your notification dated 26th July re. revised details.

We have the following objections.

General.

1. It contravenes the Heritage and Conservation status of Cliftion.

2. Contravenes Permitted Development Guidlines.

3. Style inconsistent with surrounding listed buildings.

4. Proposed development is too dense and congested leading to traffic/ parking in adjacent roads.

5. Does not respect the privacy of neighbours especially with regard to overlooking.

Specific to Auburn House.

As in our letter dated July 13th sent to Mr Peter Westbury by recorded delivery, copy below.

Mr Peter Westbury, Auburn HouseDevelopment Management, Clifton Down,Bristol City Council, Bristol, BS8 3HTPO Box 3399Bristol BS1 9SE

Dear Mr Westbury July 13th 2021

Bristol Zoo West Car Park proposed development.

1. Our property abuts the proposed development. Would you please advise whether the planning advice given in 2011 will be maintained or reversed (enclosed copy) with respect to the setting of a heritage asset. The proposed development according to this advice is incongruous. too high, and involves felling of trees. See enclosed Ministry of Housing letter.

2. There are safety issues with excavations abutting the base of the party wall which is old, historic and about 3m. high. This should be given serious consideration at the design and planning stage rather than trusting a developer to obey the rules. A previous developer of adjacent Sutton House, did not obey the rules causing considerable distress and hassle over a period of two years in the time of Planning Officers Mr J. Bishop and Ashley Grant. Partial retrospective action was taken.

See enclosed site map copy

3. A power cable extends along the surface of the party wall powering the green house and the gate that gives access to our property. This cable has been there for over 20 years when the property belonged to Clifton College. See enclosed site map copy.

We would value your reply and a site visit by planning officers would be welcomed, The enclosed Bristol planning advice was included in our email sent on June 4th where other issues were also raised such as overlooking, congestion etc. As yet we have had no response.

Yours faithfully

David and Ruth Slinn

Enclosedo Copy of 2011 Bristol Council Planning advice re Auburn House.o Site map illustrating wall positiono Ministry of housing advice re. duty of care of heritage sites

Barry Ryder  2 NORTHCOTE ROAD   on 2021-08-09   OBJECT

SUMMARY SCHEME APPRAISAL FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS' GROUPS BY

MICHAEL WOODMAN SMITH

I am sure you have received a copy of the above. I also received, by post, a copy and would like to make the following comments. There are seven paragraphs and I am inclined to support all of them, adding some emphasis of my own.

1st paragraph

The Clifton Conservation Area is very special.

2nd paragraph

It is not possible to regard the site as previously developed land.

3rd paragraph

Some additional 60 vehicles would need to be parked on our local streets.

4th paragraph

The density of the proposed development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton Conservation Area.

5th paragraph

The proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the Conservation Area.

6th paragraph

The architects have chosen not to follow the exemplar of a number of successful new buildings in Clifton. These units are designed to absolute minimum floor areas and the ground floor flats all face directly onto a road without any form of private open space.

7th Paragraph

Sir John Betjeman was probably right. Please don't make another carbuncle.

Yours faithfully

Barry Ryder

Mrs Alison Edgar   19 DOWNFIELD RD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-08   OBJECT

I object to the revised application on the following groundsOverdevelopment of the area resulting in parking problems ( only 49 spaces for 65 dwellings), andpressure on local roads and servicesDesign of proposed new buildings doesn't fit or blend with existing local architecture , importantanywhere but particularly in a conservation areaThe 5 storey block proposed is too tall, looking out of keeping with its surroundings and spoilingthe view for visitors to the area as well as residentsIt is wrong to fell 15 mature trees when the council's duty is to preserve the natural environmentfor the benefit of allOverall the revised proposal fails to enhance or preserve a conservation area and represents aserious loss of amenity for Bristol which would adversely affect current and future populations

Dr John Kingman  HARLEY LODGE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-08   OBJECT

This application is as bad as its predecessor. It greedily proposes twice as many flats asthe site will bear, in buildings too large and too near the road to fit with the Clifton townscape. Thedevelopers are playing the usual trick of repeating their proposals with slight variations in the hopeof eventual approval (as with the W.H. Smith site). Approval of overdevelopment on this site wouldprove a damning precedent for the main zoo area.

Dr Paul Main  2 RODNEY COTTAGES CLIFTON DOWN ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-07   OBJECT

There have been some minor changes in the application which in no way addresses theobjections that I made on the 21 July 2021.The reduction in height at the north end of the block, makes no significant difference to the overalldesign. This block is too high, massive and out of all proportion with the surrounding Victorianarchitecture in this important conservation area. .Having today re-inspected the site it is clear that this is an over intensive development, which ifbuilt will very cramped. The lack of parking provision is a very serious error.From the experience of the Covid-19 pandemic it is obvious that we all need more spaciousdevelopments with more gardens, shrubs and trees, which will be essential when we experiencemore pandemics in the future.A higher quality and more imaginative design is required as indicated in the reports from HistoricEngland and CHIS.

Miss B M Florance  FLAT 3 THE CLOISTERS 22 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-08-07   OBJECT

Newly submitted variations on the Bristol Zoo Former Car park in College Road Clifton BS8 3HS 0n 22 July 2021

I have observed that the alterations to the original application and see they are very minor. Surely the planning officer, on behalf of Clifton residents, should expect that any new buildings should be of a similar design to the existing ones. . They should fit in with the Clifton Architecture. The whole plan is too big and certainly will not fit in with the surrounding area. The number of properties and height that the planners/Zoo owners want to put in are far too many. They need less and not so unsightly ones. Where do they intend to let residents park as we all know most families have their own transport these days. They will be there and if no room then they will park in the surrounding roads. I still think the entrance to this new site should be maintained where it is rather than having a junction in Cecil Road. The few original houses in the last part of College Road are going to have traffic outside their house as usual but also outside their back plus an unsightly view of these awful crowded properties.

Unless there are major alterations I cannot remove my objections in my communication on 23 June 2021 . So it reiterate them plus the above.

David Sinclair  63 CLIFTON PARK ROAD   on 2021-08-07   OBJECT

I would like to complain, concerning the development of the zoo carpark.The plan will over densify the site.It is not realistic to have more homes than parking spaces.Most households have two cars.There is no provision to purchase on street parking permits.More parking should be created on site with less homes.

Yours sincerely.

David Sinclair

Mr Charles Kinsey  3 NORTHCOTE ROAD TFF BRISTOL  on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

The revised plan shows a minimal reduction in the number of accommodation units onthe site as a result of complaints. I remain very concerned about air pollution in the area fromvehicles. The original pamphlet published by the Zoo stated that there would be no increase intraffic over and above what the Zoo generates but, with what I estimate could be an additional 80+cars using the site (this excludes delivery vehicles which have increased enormously during thelast 18 months). There is thus surely going to be far more traffic than at present and, at peaktimes, more congestion. Bristol City Council is working hard to reduce air pollution in the City frompetrol & diesel engines but this development will increase it - and within the close proximity of aschool. There will also be much more pressure on local parking in College Road and otherneighbouring roads as not all the additional cars will be accommodated within the actual West CarPark site. It is essential for this reason that the number of units of accommodation is reducedfurther and considerably.

Mr Colin Shurrock  5 CANYNGE SQ CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

The scale, density and nature of the proposed development would adversely effect thecharacter of the neighbourhood.For example the height of the proposed development does not fit with existing properties inCollege Rd

  FLAT 2 4 CECIL ROAD   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

  FLAT 2 4 CECIL ROAD   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

Mrs Valerie Howard  42 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

I wish to object to this revised planning application for the housing scheme on this site, which apart from a few very minor alterations, does not satisfy the needs of the neighbourhood -

a. The proposal still constitutes over-intensive development of the site.

b. The buildings are still taller than the surrounding buildings and architecturally totally out of keeping

c. The poor design and over crowding would damage the setting of the surrounding listed and other unlisted buildings of merit in the immediate area.

d. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who will walk/cycle/bus to work/shop will still have cars for family excursions and visits to destinations in the country not accessible by public transport, and in an emergency.

e. Still a lack of amenity space

f. several mature trees will be lost

g. This new proposed development would still fail to preserve or enhance the character of this Conservation Area. It looks as though the sole aim of this revised application is still to render this site as profitable as possible and it fails to have any regard for the wellbeing of the local residents, compatibility with the existing local architecture and the conservation are or the environment generally.

Valerie Howard

Stephen P Howard  42 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

I wish to object to the revised planning application for the West Car Park as it has altered so very little from the original plan, reducing the number of homes by only 3, and no more car parking spaces.

The architecture is totally unsympathetic to the surrounding listed and unlisted buildings and still taller than them.

No thought has been given to the local residents regarding increased traffic and noise.

Stephen Howard

Patricia Cook  40 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

I am aware that a revised plan has been put in for the development of this site.

The revisions are so small when the whole thing needs a major re-think that my previous letter objected to the scheme still stands. I enclose it for your information.

Patricia CookOwner Flats 3 and 940 College RoadBS8 3HX

As one of your nearest neighbours I am writing to object to several aspects of your proposed plan which will severely affect my property.

I have already objected to this proposed development but to be clear I am sending you my main objections which are listed below:

1. The site is too small for the 65 houses proposed which will look and feel like a ghetto.

2. The parking arrangements are completely inadequate. There is already huge pressure on the roads in the vicinity.

3. There is a lack of internal green space in this plan and no promise to keep existing mature trees.

3. The entrance road is far too tight from Cecil Road, which is narrow. Traffic will back

up causing danger and congestion and pollution. College Road is much wider therefore access should remain where it is.

4. The entrance road is also far too close to the properties on College Road all of which have tiny gardens backing up to your wall. It will considerably impact on the quiet peace and enjoyment of these properties.

5. The scale and finish of your proposed buildings is completely inappropriate - they are too tall and quite out of character with the very special area around the Zoo. Money must be spent on the correct building materials for this area, Limestone, Pennant sandstone and Bathstone and the style of architecture needs to be sympathetic to the handsome Victorian villas that make up this area.

When it come to developing the main Zoo site the loss of amenity of the Zoo's Gardens and cafe would be a disaster for this very fine area which gives people that very important connection with the natural world, bringing improvement to mental health, and in a sociable setting, which will surely be SO very important in a post pandemic (maybe) urban setting.

Patricia Cook

Timothy CB Cook  40 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

I understand the revised plan had now been put in place.

My original reasons for objecting have not been engaged with- apart from the tweaks to the building at the end of College Road which I consider so minor that it is hardly a change at all.

My original letter objecting to the Development of this site therefore still stands.

1) The site size is too small even for the number of houses that are still proposed.

2) No improvement in parking situation is a disaster.

3) Lack of green space and area needs to keep mature trees as priority.

4) Entrance road of great concern - my property is right against the entrance. It should be moved further down Cecil Road to give the back of the buildings on College Road appropriate breathing space - they are tall and need light and air.

5) Scale still to great and finish still not appropriate.

Timothy CB CookOwner40 College Road Flats 3 and 9

Alejandro Umana  3 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,

Re. Planning application 21/01999/F; Former Car Park College Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 3HX. (Erection of 65 dwellings with associated parking, vehicular access and associated infrastructure and landscaping.)

I am writing to strongly object to planning application 21/01999/F. The reasons for my objection are summarized below:

Design Shortcomings

The scale and intensity of the proposed 65 dwellings development is unprecedented in the Clifton area, it is unlikely to meet the Heritage Planning Guidelines and certainly is not aligned with the historic buildings in the surrounding areas. The proposed layout was designed thinking about maximizing profit and not the wellbeing of the people that will live in this development or the surroundings. This over-intensive development has too many units crammed into a small area, there are no really meaningful community spaces and/or gardens where people can get together outside, which, during the COVID-19 pandemic has taken even more relevance.

There is no precedent for a 5-storey building of the proposed size anywhere in the area.

Traffic and Parking issues

As stated above, the scale and intensity of the massive 65 dwellings development is unprecedented in the Clifton area. The existing roads in Clifton area are already highly

congested by local traffic and school traffic around arrival and departure times, not only by Clifton College traffic but also other schools in the area in the immediate neighbourhood. This development will likely put another 60 to 100 cars on the streets of Clifton complicating the parking and traffic situation even more. If we add the fact that only 45 units have parking spaces allocated in this development, it will mean that all other vehicles will have to be parked on the street.

The council should also consider that the current proposal only accounts for one road to enter and exit the development for the 65 dwellings. This will inevitably create congestion and undesired noise and pollution.

The character of the development proposed and Conservation zone.

The proposed block of flats is excessively large and which by no means respect the character of the existing buildings in the area. Firstly, five (5) storeys are planned on the main block of flats which are two (2) storeys higher than any of the neighbouring buildings. Secondly, the completely out of proportion (in terms of elevation, length and shape) of the buildings (especially the main block of flats) is not remotely aligned with the architecture of this conservation area and in my opinion dissents enormously with the character of the area.

We, the local residents have been facing in the past stricter planning controls than other areas, when planned to implement relatively small and minor changes to our properties such as changing the historic sash windows for state-of-the-art double-glazing windows, the installation of solar panels and/or altering slightly the shape of the roof due to conservation areas related reasons. The proposed development is not in line with the local character, does not maintain similar architecture to the existing buildings and does not respect its Conservation setting. The Council should consider the efforts local people, and the council itself, have made over many years to maintain and campaign for this Conservation Area.

The spirit of the community.

In line with the above, the Council should consider the efforts local people have made over many years to maintain and campaign for this area to maintain the character of the area. This Planning application will destroy all that.

Cumulative Impact

As part of my work (development of utility scale solar PV projects) we are repeatedly required to undertake cumulative impact assessments when projects are to be developed in close proximity to the others. It is quite sensible to think that if the proponents are proposing a development on the Zoo Car Park, it is quite likely that they will request an additional planning application for further housing developments inside de current zoo garden grounds in the future. All the reasons for the objections above would be significantly exacerbated by having a second, potentially much larger, development just across the road of the first one.

I encourage the Planning Authority to request an assessment of the potential cumulative impact generated by the combined developments. This assessment should take into consideration the impacts that the proposed development could potentially have on the neighbourhood and the surrounding area. In essence, (as is already requested for other type of developments by the City Council) cumulative impacts are those which result from incremental changes caused by other past, present or reasonably foreseeable developments, together with the proposed development. Therefore, the potential impacts of the proposed development cannot be considered in isolation.

I trust that the above objections will be taken fully into account in determining this application.

Yours sincerely Alejandro Umana

Joana Ortiz De Zarate  3 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-08-06   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,

Re. Planning application 21/01999/F; Former Car Park College Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 3HX. (Erection of 65 dwellings with associated parking, vehicular access and associated infrastructure and landscaping.)

I have read the resubmission of the application and still I am writing to object to planning application 21/01999/F.

1. The proposed multi-family home is too large and in no way respects the character of the existing buildings and the area in general. The proposal shows a massive block of apartments 5 floors high. When looking at the neighbouring properties and also the standard constructions in that area of Clifton, one can see that there is no single block of apartments of that size in the whole Clifton. Worth noting that the main apartment building proposed is a "solid" sixty (60) meter long block and five (5) floors high, which in fact is two (2) floors higher than the neighbouring buildings in College Road. I find quite distressing that on the planning application documentation "Document Two - Design Development and Engagement" the developer tries to confuse the reader by showing the same number of windows (3) between the existing and the project buildings (comparison between the second and third picture on the document), while if one sees the render of the actual building to be constructed, they have four windows instead of 3 plus and additional floor as an attic. One has to note that the neighbouring buildings consist of a basement plus 3 floor high buildings, while the proposed development has

five (5) floors in total. 2. The total disproportion in terms of length and height of the apartment block does not fit with the architecture of the area (let me remind that is a Conservation Area). 3. The proposed development does not correspond to the local character and does not have an architecture similar to the existing buildings.

4. This is an over intensive development with a massive 65 residential dwellings cramped in a small area incompatible with historic buildings in the surrounding area.

5. The scale and intensity of construction of 65 residential units is unprecedented in the Clifton area.

6. The development clearly didn't try to save any of the 15 mature trees present on the site. There are also no really meaningful community spaces or gardens where people can gather.

7. The scale and intensity of construction of 65 residential units will add to the already heavily loaded traffic and parking issues in the area. This development is likely to bring more than 60 additional vehicles, and one has to note that the developer has not allowed for sufficient parking.

8. The current proposal considers only one entry and exit access on Cecil Road for all inhabitants of the development. This will inevitably lead to traffic jams, unwanted noise, pollution and health and safety issues related to the many students transiting the streets and walking to the field in college fields road.

9. This development fails to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture as it would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. Sincerely Joana Ortiz de Zarate

Mrs Linda Edwards  3 CANYNGE SQUARE CLIFTON  on 2021-08-05   OBJECT

The applicants have slightly amended their application. Those amendments in no wayaddress my serious objections to this scheme, set forth in my comment dated June 3rd 2021. Iwish, therefore, to reiterate those objections.

The applicants say that it is their 'ambition that the scheme should be of the highest quality andsensitive to the surrounding conservation area' and that it is their 'wish to leave a legacy of whichto be proud' yet the application submitted is of low quality, completely insensitive to itssurroundings and designed only to make as much profit as possible.

This completely and utterly flawed scheme should be withdrawn. No amount of mere tweaking willrender it acceptable.

Ms Dene Bristol  14  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

The alterations are a slight tinkering with the original proposal and do not address anyof the major issues which remain the same - absolutely inappropriate to a conservation area withmany listed buildings, the scale has huge car parking and congestion issues - with the attendingsafety and environmental issues that cars in jams and driving round narrow streets trying to findparking give. It needs to be scaled down in size with more green space overall.

Mr Alan Wall  1 GLENAVON CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

I have reviewed the additional application from Bristol Zoo but find it little different fromthe original plans. These plans are not fit for a Conservation Area, featuring many listed buildings,indeed, they will damage the area. They are out of character, too densely packed with insufficientcommunal areas for residents. The apartment block proposed for College Road is still too tall andout of character with adjacent buildings. The alterations in the new plan are minimal, insufficientfor me to change my opinion.I stand by my original objection.

Mrs Helen Gardhouse  CLIFTONBANK CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

We still object to the new plans submitted by the zoo which are not materially differentto the first application. All the reasons for our initial objection still very much apply and we attach acopy of these reasons.

We own and occupy Cliftonbank on Clifton Down and hereby object to the above application forplanning permission for the reasons set out below. We would be grateful if you would take thesecomments into account when considering the application.It is our view that the proposals currently presented are harmful to the setting of our home which isa listed building that faces Clifton Down as well as the neighbouring listed buildings and thosenon-designated heritage assets that are located on or close to College Road and that they willresult in detriment and substantial harm to the character of the conservation area.

We have prepared these representations in conjunction with our neighbours living in SuttonHouse, Auburn house and Avonbank on Clifton Down, although certain aspects of thisrepresentation relate specifically to the impact on the proposed development upon our home andour residential amenity.

The proposed development, by reason of its location, substantial scale and quantum ofdevelopment in combination with its detrimental visual impact, represents unsympathetic infill andover-intensive development that detracts from the setting of the listed buildings on Clifton Down,the character and appearance of the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area, local landscapecharacter, negatively impacts on views within the local area and harms the setting of the locallylisted Clifton Pavilion.

The application is contrary to the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) which states inparagraph 193 that when considering the impact of a proposed development on the significance ofa designated heritage asset, great weight should be given to the asset's conservation (and themore important the asset, the greater the weight should be).The prominent location, and substantial massing, size, scale, form, and appearance of theproposed development is such that there will be a significant adverse effect on the character of theconservation area, the setting of Clifton and those listed buildings on Clifton Down. Likewise, thedevelopment will have a detrimental effect on outlook from the listed Villas and the surroundingproperties including the Clifton Pavilion.

It is also our view that the development proposes a substantial loss of historic fabric, that includesbut is not limited to the historic rear garden wall fronting College Road and the former outbuildingonce within the curtilage of Avonbank. The loss of these two structures will cause irreparabledamage to the street scene.

We fully accept the need to find a new future for the land following the closure of the Zoo and donot oppose development in principle but are strongly of the opinion that such development shouldbe proportionate in scale, should respect the setting of the listed and locally listed buildings,should enhance the Conservation Area, and should not pose serious harm to the character of theConservation Area.

Historical ContextHistorically, Cliftonbank and the neighbouring Villas on Clifton Down had generous gardens andassociated outbuildings, carriage houses and glasshouses to match their grandeur and status, allof which extended to what is now College Road. The land associated with the Villas covered theplot between Clifton Down and College Road. The Villas were built as semi-detached homes eachwith separate entrances off Clifton Down.

The application site originally formed part of the gardens to the Clifton Down Villas. Until the landwas sold, it contained a few modest single storey buildings and a number of glasshouses, of whichthe Building A (as described in the application Historic Environment DBA) survives. In addition,Cliftonbank's title deeds (AV229121) states that:no direction or building whatsoever shall at any time hereafter be erected built or placed upon or inthe said plot of ground here by appointed and granted or intended so to be or any part thereofother than or except Boundry walls conservatory hot houses or greenhouses and one detachedsingle or double villa and coach houses and stables and that no Boundry wall shall exceed theheight of 12 feet from the present level of the said land and that the said Villa and stables andcoach houses (if built) shall be respectively confined to and within the position and limits denotedor intended to be denoted for the same respectively in and by the said map or plan hereonendorsed and no such stable or coachhouse shall exceed the height (including roofs and tops ofchimneys) of 23 feet from the surface of the stable road or way adjoining the said land

The attached representations were made to the Zoo on 2nd March in response to theirconsultation event. It is regrettable the proposed development was not amended as a result of therepresentations and therefore this formal objection is a necessary.

Our Home - CliftonbankWe are the lucky occupiers of our wonderful home, for which we are custodians for futuregenerations not only of occupiers, but also of residents of and visitors to Clifton.Cliftonbank is a listed as a building of special architectural and historic interest. It is describedalong with our neighbours homes in the Pevsner Architectural Guide to Bristol in the following way'on Clifton Down towards Bridge Valley Road are more substantial Villas, in various styles.Flemish Renaissance at Sutton and Auburn House; Italianate at Avonbank (now Blue House) andLlanfoist, by Henry Goodridge (1857); Victorian palazzo at Eaton and Glenavon, c.1853, with arow of four segmental pediments crammed between narrow belvederes; and Jacobean atTellisford and Trinmore'.In the City Councils Clifton & Hotwells Character Appraisal & Management Proposals(Conservation Area 5) the description of the houses refers to them as 'palatial Villas ofmonumental scale'. These Villas built in the Jacobian and Italianate styles, are heritage assets ofsignificant importance, the setting of which should be conserved or enhanced. They aresubstantial Villas that are visually dominant due to their scale and the openness to both the frontand rear of them and are the most significant heritage assets in the locality.

Avonbank/Cliftonbank (Henry Goodrich 1857) are a pair of imposing semi-detached Villas ofsignificant scale and grandeur. Together with the adjoining Auburn House/Sutton House (1855),Eaton House/Glenvale (1853) and Tellisford/Trinmore House (William Baker 1853) they form animportant group of beautiful Grade II listed buildings that have been the dominant structures in thispart of the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation area for almost 160 years.

The semi-detached Villas each have separate entrances off Clifton Down and between each pairthe gaps offer important and intriguing glimpses through and give the sense of open land to therear as illustrated by Image 1 below.Image 1 - Glimpse through Archway at Sutton House

Cliftonbank had very generous gardens which extended behind its neighbour Avonbank towardsCollege Road, with an extended frontage with the road, the majority of the boundary wall to whichstill exist today but is proposed for demolition as part of the submitted application.

As illustrated in Figures i and ii below, the land associated with Cliftonbank included theassociated late C19 outbuildings, carriage houses and glasshouses that formed part of itscurtilage. The gardens have reduced in scale, with the rear section now forming part of theapplication site. The mature trees and the walls that surround the garden still give the sense ofgenerous open spaces behind. That openness is intrinsically linked to the setting of the Villa.

Cliftonbank is, along with the neighbouring Villas, a landmark building, the historic significance ofwhich is derived from its scale and architectural design. The Villas make a positive contribution tothe area and provide key elements within the streetscene.

Proposed DevelopmentThe application site has, bar the development of coach houses and glass houses, remaineddevoid of significant development since the C19, when it was developed for residential gardens.After the various sales in the mid-C20, it has remained as an open landscaped car park behind ahistoric stone wall.

The submitted application proposes to;- Demolish the remaining rear curtilage garden wall to the original listed Villa curtilage;- Demolish the remaining coach house;- Replace the open space with the only 5 storey development in the direct vicinity, which willbecome the largest single block and the dominant building in the area;- Break the important historic views between the listed Villas and Clifton Pavilion;- Block and obscure views from the Downs and those from Cecil Road;- Remove any existing views across the site towards Clifton Downs to the north west and ChristChurch to the South;- Erect 3 and 4 storey homes directly behind the listed Villas, some of which are very close to theexisting listed buildings.The pair of modern three story houses are proposed abutting the garden wall of our home and alarge terrace of five modern 3 storey houses are proposed abutting our rear garden wall.

The total disregard for the setting of Cliftonbank and the neighbouring listed buildings, thecharacter of the Conservation Area and the historic form of development is astounding.

The proposed development will obliterate views, dominate the listed buildings, dominate the locallylisted Clifton Pavilion, and cause irreparable damage of a scale even greater than the previousharmful development at Dowry Parade, the Pembroke Road Flats and at Wisemans on WorcesterRoad. It will if allowed to proceed, without doubt be the most inappropriate development everpermitted in the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area.

Impact on Residential Amenity - Loss of PrivacyThe harm caused by the proposed development upon our residential amenity is of greatimportance and should be afforded significant weight.

Our home has a very high level of privacy, with only their direct neighbours being able to view theirrear gardens at an oblique angle and no direct habitable room window to window overlooking.The proposed development incorporates 3 storey housing close to our home and Sutton House,directly abutting our garden wall, with windows looking across our garden towards our home.

It also proposed a terrace of 5 modern 3 storey homes at the rear of our garden with windowslooking directly into our garden and towards our home.This development in very close proximity to our home and our private amenity space will result in asignificant loss of privacy causing harm to residential amenity, taking away a level of privacy thathas existed since 1857.

The proposed development of a massive 5 storey block of apartments (block A) and 3 storey blockof apartments (block B) will also result in many households looking down towards the habitablerooms and private amenity space of all four Villas and those existing properties on College Roadand along the top of Clifton Down, resulting in both a real and perceived loss of privacy.Cliftonbank has enjoyed a very high level of privacy since 1857, with no close window to windowoverlooking and no close dwellings looking directly into habitable rooms and private amenityspace.The 3 storey pair of modern semi-detached houses and the large block of five 3 storey modernterraced houses will destroy our privacy and residential amenity. They are inappropriate in scaleand will cause a great deal of harm to our amenity.Significant weight should be afforded to the harm caused by the loss of privacy as a result of theproposed development. Planning permission should be refused for this reason alone.Impact on Residential Amenity - Overbearing DevelopmentThe massive scale of the proposed development, including the 5 storey block along the entireCollege Road frontage dominating the area, the 3 storey semi-detached houses directly abuttingout garden wall very close to our listed home and the 3 storey terrace at the rear of our home willhave a harmful overbearing impact upon us.This impact is all the more harmful due to the fact that the Villas have been the largest buildings inthis part of the conservation area since the 1850's, with no buildings causing any overbearingimpact.We will go from having a garden with no surrounding buildings to one that is hemmed in from 2sides by 3 storey development and residents looking down into our garden and habitable rooms.Such a massive overbearing impact will significantly harm our residential amenity.Planning permission should be refused for this reason alone.

Impact on Residential Amenity - Harm to OutlookCliftonbank has, since it was constructed in 1857, had an attractive outlook to the rear, initiallyover the gardens of the Villas and then over a car park used only up to 4.30pm on any day.The existing attractive outlook will, if planning permission is granted, be replaced by an outlook of3 storey modern dwellings abutting our side garden wall and a large terrace of 3 storey modernhomes abutting our rear garden wall, all framed by a massive 5 storey block over 60 meters wideblocking out all outlook towards the Zoo and the surrounding conservation area.Such a dramatic change in outlook will be very harmful to residential amenity and alone justifiesthe refusal of planning permission.

Other Heritage Assets

The Villas are not, of course, the only heritage assets of importance when considering thedevelopment of the West Car Park.Much of the original rear curtilage of the Villas was sold in the first half of the C20, with manyformer coach houses and glass houses having been demolished. The only remnant of the formercoach houses and historic use of the land is the former outbuilding to Avonbank which remains insitu within the proposed development site. If the former Arts and Craft style outbuilding remainedwithin the curtilage of the Villa today it would be curtilage listed. The fact that it has been severedfrom the Villa should not diminish its importance as a heritage asset and remnant of the originalresidential use of the land. The roof of the Coach House can be seen in Image 2 below.Image 2 View from the top of College Road of the gap formed by the application site allowingviews to houses on Percival Road and the spire of Christ Church. The former boundary wallsalong College Road, the outbuilding fronting College RoadFigure i: Extract from the 1879-88 Town Plan of Bristol showing the gardens and formeroutbuildingsFigure ii: Extract from the 1st Edition 25" OS map 1885As discussed, an important heritage asset is the remaining section of the rear garden wall to theVillas, a large part of which remains intact fronting Collage Road and is illustrated on Image 2above. This again would be heritage listed should it have remained within the curtilage of theVillas. It is a noteworthy feature in the conservation area. Notwithstanding the multitude ofownerships and uses that is now found in this area, the stone walls continue to define the historicboundaries of the Villa gardens, whilst the smaller structures and notably the former outbuilding atthe West Car Park exit on College Road all illustrate the historic relationship between the Villasand surrounding land. These features all make an important contribution to the streetscene andthe wider conservation area, and the weight given to their importance as heritage assets shouldreflect this.The backdrop to the Villas has, since its construction in the 1920's, been the Clifton Pavilion, alocally listed building. This is a notable building which provides a backdrop to College Road intandem with the terrace on College Road. The Pavilion makes an important contribution to localcharacter. It is a further important heritage asset, which is included on the Council's local list ofbuildings and is identified in the City Councils Conservation Area Character

Appraisal as a 'Building of Merit'.The Clifton Pavilion has a strong relationship with the Villas and with the terrace of houses onCollege Road, is a dominant feature when seen from their rear habitable rooms and gardens. It isalso significant in view across the site from Cecil Road as well as those glimpsed views betweenthe Villas from College Road. The Pavilion is a visual link between the listed Villas and the Zooand one that has existed uninterrupted for 100 years.Image 3 - View from Ground Floor of Sutton HouseImage 4 - View from Garden of Sutton HouseImage 5: The Clifton Pavilion and terrace on College Road seen from the garden of Sutton HouseImages 3 illustrates the view from the ground floor of Sutton House, with Clifton Pavilion to the leftand early C20 century terraced homes on College Road to the right, constructed on the site of the

former Sutton House stables following the sale of the stables in 1900. Image 4 illustrates the viewfrom the garden.Images 4 illustrates a wider view from the garden of Sutton House, with Clifton Pavilion to the left,the early C20 century terraced homes on College Road to the right, and the homes on Cecil Roadto the right.Image 5 illustrates the view from the garden of Sutton House, which even when screen by hedgeshighlights how important the outlook towards the Clifton Pavilion is.Where surrounding buildings can be glimpsed from the rear of the Villas they are of a scalesubservient to the Villas and easily recognisable as buildings which were used for purposessubordinate to and dependent on the domestic use of the Villas. The Coach House conversions tothe rear of Tellisford House/Trinmore illustrated on Image 6 illustrate the relationship.Image 6 - Coach house Conversions to rear of Tellisford House/TrinmoreThe scale of the Coach House development is appropriate and is complaint with the guidance setout in the Clifton & Hotwells Character Appraisal & Management Proposals at paragraph 6.1.7which states;'6.1.7 The large semi-detached Villas further north tend to sit centrally in a large garden with aboundary wall. The mews have a smaller scale of development, set behind the principle Georgianand Victorian streets. These are characterised by their sense of enclosure, with propertiesaccessed via narrow routes and directly addressing the street.'Equally, the existing stone walls fronting Cecil Road and College Road reflect the construction andmaterials of the Villas, demonstrating their historic role of enclosing the gardens of the Villas andalthough no longer within the ownership of the Villas in most cases, are considered to make animportant contribution to both the setting of the listed Villas bit also the character and appearanceof the Conservation Area. The fact that the ownership link has been severed, should not diminishthe importance of the wall as a heritage asset.

Notwithstanding the multitude of ownerships and uses that is now found in this area, the stonewalls continue to define the historic boundaries of the Villa gardens, whilst the smaller structuresand notably the garage building at the West Car Park exit on College Road all illustrate the historicrelationship between the Villas and surrounding land. These features all make an importantcontribution to the streetscene, and the wider conservation area and the weight given to theirimportance as a heritage asset should reflect this.

The boundary walls provide important features that allow for view across the application site suchas is illustrated in Image 2 where the long views include the spire of Christ Church.Other buildings in the site including Glenavon Cottage are of similar importance for which a fullheritage assessment should be completed before any development proposal is decided upon.

Car Park DevelopmentThe cartographic evidence shows that even after the Zoo acquired the land its use has not beenintense and that after 4:30pm its use for staff or visitor parking has ceased.This has resulted in a quite use of low intensity use and one that is devoid of tall buildings. From

the public domain, as illustrated in Images 2, 7 and 8, the impression is that the land behind thewalls forms part of the curtilage of the Villas. This is only compromised by the presence of CarParks signs. Its use as car park did not cause harm to the character of the Conservation Area,harm to the setting of the listed buildings and other heritage assets or harm to residential amenity.Its limited use and lack of tall buildings means the car park with its trees and modest structureshas a neutral impact upon the wider character of the area.Image 7 - View across site from College Road by Zoo EntranceImage 8 - View across site towards Auburn House from Collage Road/Cecil Road JunctionExisting Trees and Open Character

The site has a number of well established trees, which maintain the appearance of gardens setwithin the walls that front College Road, Cecil Road and Clifton Down. The trees maintain andcontribute to the open character of the land, again giving the impression that it remains residentialcurtilage from outside views.The application site is one that retains a tranquil relationship with gardens of the Villas andmaintains the visual relationship between those properties and the Zoo buildings. The opencharacter of the application site is also important in maintaining the setting and visual hierarchy ofthe architectural importance of the landmark Villas on Clifton Down. Equally, the lack ofdevelopment within the site maintains the unobstructed outlook from those properties on CecilRoad towards the Downs.

In this regard the character is defined by the Villas which back onto an open area that lacksnotable development. The importance of the application site is that it does not impose upon itsneighbours or challenges the hierarchy of the Villas or to a lesser degree, the Zoo's own CliftonPavilion. It is one of many open areas within Clifton that contribute to the well-established verdantfeel of mature trees and planting in the substantial private and communal gardens and spaces. Itis a space that gives view across Clifton and in this regard it forms part of the urban grain ofstreets interspersed with important open spaces.

The Setting of the Listed BuildingsThe Council have a duty under sections 16 and 66 of the Planning (Listed Buildings andConservation Areas) Act 1990 to ensure that when making a decision on planning applications fordevelopment that affects the setting of a listed building, the Authority must have special regard tothe desirability of preserving the setting of the listed building(s).Recent court rulings have concluded that considerable importance and weight must be given tothe desirability of preserving the setting of a heritage asset. This has been clearly set out in recentcaselaw including Barnwell vs East Northamptonshire DC 2014, in which it was made clear that inenacting section 66(1) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990Parliament's intention was that 'decision makers should give "considerable importance and weight"to the desirability of preserving the setting of listed buildings' when carrying out the balancingexercise'.The issue of setting has also been further reinforced with regard to the consideration of the effect

upon the setting not only in terms of the visual effects but also such factors as historic association(Catesby Estates Ltd v. Steer [2018]).The harm to the setting caused by the inappropriate scale of this development and its closerelationship with the listed Villas is immeasurable. It is our view that this proposal will causesubstantial harm to the setting of the Villas but also the wider context of Clifton.Historically, the site was intrinsically connected with the development of the Villas and terraces inits environs. The Site's development started as the gardens of the grand Villas that line CliftonDown and after its acquisition by the Zoo, was then put to the low key use as car parking.

The application for 65 or 63 dwellings would therefore be contrary to S.16 & 66 of the Act as wellas being contrary to the Council's own policies on the historic environment as set out in PolicyDM31. The Council's policies on listed buildings seeks to ensure development in their vicinity, willbe expected to have no adverse impact on those elements which contribute to their specialarchitectural or historic interest, including their settings.The proposed development would fail to preserve the setting of the heritage assets.The application should be refused for this reason alone.The Conservation Area Issues:Section 72 of the 1990 Act requires that LPAs pay special attention in the exercise of planningfunctions to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of aconservation area. The Council's policies relating to development within, or which would affect thesetting of a conservation area will be expected to preserve or, where appropriate, enhance thoseelements which contribute to their special character or appearance.Scale of Development - Over IntensiveThe Clifton & Hotwells Character Appraisal & Management Proposals identifies that one of themain issues impacting the residential areas of the Conservation area is unsympathetic over-intensive development. It states;'5.48 Infill development from the 1960s has had has significant impact. Many developments areout of context with their domestically scaled surroundings. Over-intensively developed sites havecontributed to a population increase in parts of the conservation area''6.1.1 Over the years infill development has taken place, particularly on some bomb and lightindustrial sites. This has disrupted the original layout and eroded the traditional street pattern,which it is desirable to preserve.'Action to ensure that over-intensive development that could harm the Conservation Area is notallowed is set out at paragraphs 9.4, 10.11, 10.13 and 10.14 which state;'9.4 New developments or infill that fail to respect the character of an area, or ignore thepredominant building lines, scale, proportions, details or materials etc. can pose serious harm tothe special interest of the conservation area.'10.11 With applications for new development, encourage high-quality design and materials,sensitive to the character or appearance of the conservation area, through positive use of existingdevelopment management powers.

10.13 Ensure that predominant scale, materials, details and building lines are respected in line

with the BLP/LDF policies and findings within the character appraisal.10.14 Increased awareness of conservation issues and understanding of the character of theconservation area through promotion of the character appraisal.The proposed scale of development is massively greater than any other in the area, including thehistorically dominant listed Villas. It will cause significant irreparable harm just as the 1960'sdevelopments have already done. The City Council should not repeat the mistakes of the past.This is a scheme that runs contrary to the NPPF as set out in paragraphs 193 and 195.The scale proposed fails to respect the character of the area and ignores the historic scale andproportions of buildings in the area. It will dominate the Villas, break the relationship between theVillas and the Zoo and change the character of the area for the worst for ever.

The development would also fundamentally change the setting and create a new urban hierarchyin which the Villas would be subservient to the new terrace along College Road, which would be ofa scale and mass that would dominate the area.In combination with the rows of housing to the rear of this terrace, the impact would be one thatcause substantial harm to the setting of the listed buildings and when would be contrary to Councilpolicy on the heritage assets and recent case law, in which the statutory obligation must be tohave special regard to the desirability of preserving setting.For this reason alone; planning permission should be refused.

Proximity to Listed Buildings - Harm to SettingHistorically outbuildings in this location were modest and did not impose upon the amenity of thehouses, set as they were towards the eastern end of the gardens.The proposed development would create an unacceptable level of development in very closeproximity to the listed buildings that would fundamentally change the subservient character of theland and rather than enhance or preserve the openness of the application site would introducelargescale built form and high-intensity land use.The proposed development of the 3 storey housing hard against the garden boundary of our homeand the 3 storey terrace of 5 houses abutting the rear garden of our home will be detrimental tothe setting of the listed building in a way that is harmful to the historic understanding of the site aswell as the overall setting of the heritage asset. They do not represent the scale of existing Mewsdevelopment in the area as illustrated by Image 6 above.The row of five three storey dwellings are not Mews houses and again bear no resemblance to thelow scale Mews house developments in the local area, as demonstrated in Image 6 above. Theyare instead a modern terrace of 3 storey housing as can be seen on any modern housing estate.Equally the development of the taller buildings within the site and the row of 5 storey houses along

College Road have little in common with the scale of surrounding development.The current national planning policy and guidance in England, in the NPPF and the PPG, theseproposals would cause substantial harm to the surroundings in which [the heritage] asset isexperienced. The application site is one where the heritage assets are 'experienced' in many waysand is not limited only to the sense of sight. The 'surroundings' of the heritage assets include the

physical surroundings and well as the sense of space in which they are experienced, all of whichwill be compromised by the proposed development.The harm to the setting of the listed buildings is significant and alone justifies the refusal ofplanning permission.Highway Layout - Inappropriate Form of DevelopmentTurning to the issue of the proposed access route from Cecil Road, this is an attempt to createwhat is in effect a cul-de-sac development. This will introduce an alien development within theformer gardens of the listed buildings and jar when seen in the context of the wider the urban grainof Clifton. The creation of a new access road will compromise the setting of the listed buildings forwhich there is no precedent.The new road will be just beyond the block of apartments at the end of our garden, resulting inincreased traffic noise audible within our private amenity space. The access does not look to haveadequate visibility to serve such a large number of vehicular movements.The application site has long standing and well-established historical connections to the Villas, andthis is accepted by the applicants (historic environment DBA (p40)).Conservation Area - ImpactSection 72 of the 1990 Act requires that LPAs pay special attention in the exercise of planningfunctions to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of aconservation area. The Council's policies relating to development within, or which would affect thesetting of a conservation area will be expected to preserve or, where appropriate, enhance thoseelements which contribute to their special character or appearance.The special interest of the conservation area is derived from the rich, high quality townscape, withits combination of listed properties and open spaces. The sense of openness is created by theCollege sports pitches, the Zoo, and the generous rear gardens of the large ornate Villas. Thecouncil conservation area appraisal has recognised that where such spaces have been infilled,this has compromised that special interest and this proposal would have the same harmful impact.This is development that would disrupt the original urban layout and eroded the traditional streetpattern and thus be harmful to the character and appearance of the conservation area.

Open spaces within the conservation area allow for views across those spaces and although inthis case, those views are local and most notably those from the top of College Road, they allow

glimpses of and to local landmarks, attractive groups of buildings, open spaces, and streets.These views would be detrimentally affected by the proposals, notably views L26 and the reverseview of LC22 as set out in the conservation area character appraisal.The impact upon the character of the conservation area when viewed across the site will besignificant: All such views will be blocked by the development and will be lost.

The character of the conservation area will not be protected or enhanced but will be irreparablyand significantly harmed by the permanent interruption of important long distance views bothacross the site to the Downs and across the site towards Christ Church, short distance viewsbetween the existing heritage assets of the listed Villas and the Clifton Pavilion, and local views

from the surrounding area that create the character of the conservation area.The loss of important views alone justifies the refusal of planning permission.

Loss of Heritage AssetsThe Conservation Area 5 Clifton & Hotwells Character Appraisal & Management Proposals identifyhow important boundary treatments are, stating;'7.3.1 Other features and details in the townscape also contribute to a sense of localdistinctiveness. These can range from distinctive boundary treatments and street furniture, to treesand hard landscaping. Individually and collectively they contribute to the overall quality of Bristol'sstreetscape.' and'7.3.11 Railings and boundary walls contribute significantly to the character of Clifton. They addinterest in the street scene and provide a sense of enclosure.' and'7.3.17 Whether listed or unlisted, where they remain, traditional boundary walls, gates, gate piersand railings must be preserved, sympathetically restored or reinstated as and when theopportunity arises.' and'10.3 Where consent is required, resist proposals to remove boundary walls that make a positivecontribution to the character or appearance of the conservation area.'Of great importance to the setting of the listed Villas and the locally listed Clifton Pavilion, and tothe character of the conservation areas, are the stone boundary walls, which all contributepositively. Such walls are important and notable features within the conservation area and are thusimportant heritage assets.The high stone wall along College Road adds significantly to the character of the street and itsproposed demolition would be detrimental to the character of the street, the setting of the listedVillas, the setting of Clifton Pavilion and character of the wider conservation area.The remaining former outbuilding that was originally within the curtilage of Avonbank is a heritageasset of importance. It may not be individually listed, but it would have been heritage listed if stillwithin the same planning unit as Avonbank and should not be treated any differently due to itsseverance.

The loss of the building would cause significant harm both to the setting of Avonbank and thecharacter of the conservation area.Planning permission should be refused due to the significant and irreparable harm that would becaused by the unjustified demolition of important heritage assets.

Loss of Open SpaceAs described above, the site is an area of attractive open space when viewed from thesurrounding conservation area. Its development as a car park did not change this perception. Theimportance of such open spaces is set out in the Conservation Area Character Appraisal in thefollowing text;'8.4.7 Owing to the comparative lack of open space in such a large conservation area, eachportion provides a vital function in complementing the general urban character of Clifton &Hotwells. Some give a 'green screen', creating a soft edge in views into and through theConservation Area. The green spaces and community gardens also have important biodiversity

value.'Views over, into and out of the open space are of vital importance to the character of theconservation area and the setting of both the listed buildings and the other heritage assets. Theloss of this space will cause significant harm both to the character of the conservation area andthe setting of the listed buildings.A development of an appropriate scale would not cause such harm.

Harm to Other Heritage AssetsThe Clifton Pavilion is perhaps the most notable NDHA in the locality although the ConservationArea Character Appraisal also identifies other buildings which border the application site ascharacter buildings and neutral buildings, all of which make a contribution to the appearance of theconservation area.The Clifton Pavilion is located opposite the application site and has a visual connection to theVillas on Clifton Down. It is a building that forms part of the outlook of the Villas when in thegardens and looking out from the houses towards the Zoo. The building is a building of merit, thesetting of which will be harmed by the proposed development.The relationship between the Pavilion and the listed Villas as well as the other character assets, allof which has existed in harmony for 100 years, will be lost forever.The harm to this relationship is a material consideration that should be afforded significant weight.

Quality of DesignQuality of design is not just the appearance of buildings, but also how a proposed developmenttakes into account and accords with the character of the area, the scale and setting of existingbuildings, the relationship between buildings and the spaces it creates.The design proposed is of very poor quality, harms the setting of listed buildings and otherheritage assets, proposes the demolition of important heritage assets and is of such mass andscale that it will cause significant harm to the conservation area as a whole and the amenity of allwho live in it or travel through it.The harm caused by the poor quality design will significantly exceed that of the harm caused bydevelopments from the 1960s quoted by the Council as poor quality design.On design quality alone; planning permission should be refused.ConclusionWe request the Authority refuses the application for planning permission for all of the reasonsgiven above.The significant harm that would be caused by the proposed development is not outweighed by thefinancial benefits to the Zoo.The harm to our amenity and the setting of Cliftonbank would be significant, especially due to theproposal to site a pair of 3 storey modern homes adjacent to our side garden wall and a block offive 3 storey terraces at the rear of our garden, significantly changing the setting of the listedbuilding and harming our residential amenity.We would not, however, oppose an appropriate form and scale of development that retains andprotects heritage assets, protects views across, into and out of the site to the benefit of the

conservation area and does not harm the setting of the listed buildings, the character of theconservation area or residential amenity.We are confident that such a development can be designed and delivered to the benefit of all,including Bristol Zoo.

Mrs Helen Wall  1 GLENAVON CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

Having read Bristol Zoo's amended application I have to object to suchoverdevelopment in a Conservation Area which is characterised by elegant architecture andcommunal open spaces, neither of which feature in the Zoo's proposals. The block likeappearance of the apartments on College Road neither enhances the area with a modern designnor matches the adjacent houses; it does the very opposite by its unacceptable height andunsympathetic design. There are no communal spaces which is detrimental to the well being ofresidents and parking is insufficient, putting pressure on the narrow surrounding streets.I stand by the comments and objections raised by Historic England and Clifton and HotwellsImprovement Society.

Mr Graham Gilding  14  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

1 Over development far in excess of the surrounding buildings.2 Far too high.3 Not in keeping with surrounding style buildings.4 Inadequate car parking spaces.5 Access for visitors and traders (where are they going to park?)6 Congestion in Cecil Rd for both access to the plot and existing residents access to theirproperties.7 Can't see how this building is going to enhance the character of the area.

This is not a sympathetic planning design for the area, just as the old Smith site and its proposeddevelopment. Totally inappropriate with light pollution beyond belief.Surely if this goes ahead it will become a precedence to what is put up on the main Zoo site. I canonly shudder in expectation.

Come on council. Look at the development as inappropriate and get them to design somethingmore in keeping with the surrounding area.

Dr dave norris  11 PERCIVAL ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-08-04   OBJECT

The updated plans represent a very minor tweaking of the original proposal andtherefore do not address the long list of comments made by many people on the first version.

That some development has to occur on the zoo site is, I think, undisputed. Surely something thatsatisfies the needs of all stakeholders can be proposed that will be an asset to the area for manyyears to come?

Mr Michael Kendall  PETRA, THE AVENUE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-03   OBJECT

I wish to object on the apparent lack of parking spaces in relation to the number ofdwellings. At the very least there needs to be a parking place for each individual dwelling. On theface of it there may be only some 45 spaces to serve 65 dwellings. In the absence of suchprovision it is a certainty that some 20 vehicles will be forced to compete for parking on thehighway, itself already crowded in normal use.

Christine Stratford-Little  11 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL   on 2021-08-02   OBJECT

To Whom It May Concern

With regard to the very small changes made to the plans for the apartments to be built on the zoo car park, I strongly object to the mere tinkering of these plans. The whole design is a gross monstrosity fit only for the bin. It is truly ugly and greed is thesole basis of this plan.

A completely new design which includes small gardens and or balconies, and aesthetics that match the surrounding buildingsis what is needed. This cannot be done with tinkering of thecurrent plans.

  11 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL   on 2021-08-02   OBJECT

Timothy & Maddalena Davidson  4 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-08-02   OBJECT

We write with regard to the application (number 21/01999/F) for the proposed development on the former Zoo car park in College Road, Clifton.We note the revised details in relation to this application recently submitted to the Council.The revisions are, in our opinion, very minor and do not alter materially the view which we had previously expressed in respect of the proposed development. In our view, the proposals if implemented would (despite the small reduction in the number of units) result in this site being over-developed in a way which would be quite out of character with the neighbouring built environment and area.There would also appear still to be insufficient provision for car parking within the site which may well result in parking problems in the surrounding streets.The proposed block of flats fronting College Road (despite the slight reduction in height) would still be out of scale and character with the terrace of houses immediately to the left, spoiling the appearance of the road and possibly setting a precedent for further out of scale development on the main Zoo site.Timothy & Maddalena Davidson

Mr Alan Dukes  FLAT 3, 9 VYVYAN TERRACE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-08-01   OBJECT

This development will substantially change the character of the surrounding area. It isan area that enhances the whole of Bristol and is often visited by many people keen to understandthe history of the city. A large modern development is totally out of keeping with that experience.

The local area is already very congested with narrow streets and pedestrians and cyclists inabundance. This development would significantly add to both the people burden and, perhapsmore importantly, to the traffic problems. It will only be a matter of time before someone isseriously hurt or even killed.

If redevelopment of the zoological gardens is to be undertaken, then there should be a significantelement and space devoted to retaining it as a public amenity area, rather than infilling with highdensity houses. It has many links with the history of the area and the city, including membership ofBrunel as one of the early shareholders. And should remain available and accessible to all, in thesame way that the zoo has done for many many years.

May I ask you to please use your imagination for this site, rather than a means to produce cash forthe city's coffers. That would be a one-off event with the impact being felt for many years to come.

Sincerely,

Alan Dukes

Mrs Lee-Anne Warwick  7A ROYAL YORK CRESCENT BRISTOL  on 2021-08-01   OBJECT

I still object to the proposed development for the current car park located off of CollegeRoad. The revised development plan is not materially different from the original proposal, and thusmy original objection remains.The proposal still suggests a hugely dense, unattractive, and out-of-character development. Only45 parking spaces have been provided for 62 dwellings which is completely insufficient.If this application is approved, it will set a precedent for the main zoo site when it comes to theirplanning application.

Mr Andrew Ord  7 ROYAL YORK CRESCENT BRISTOL  on 2021-08-01   OBJECT

I still object to the proposed development for the current car park located off of CollegeRoad. The revised development plan is not materially different from the original proposal, and thusmy original objection remains.The proposal still suggests a hugely dense, unattractive, and out-of-character development. Only45 parking spaces have been provided for 62 dwellings which is completely insufficient.If this application is approved, it will set a precedent for the main zoo site when it comes to theirplanning application.

Dr Stefan Cembrowicz  3 SION HILL CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-31   OBJECT

Once again I have to say that this is an insensitive over intensive development in aconservation area. The materials used do not reflect local style, car parking will be compromisedin the area, and the "affordable" housing development is cramped and second rate, suggestingthat this is a token feature.

Mrs Bryn Allpress  33 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-07-31   OBJECT

I still object to the proposed development for the current car park located off of CollegeRoad. The revised development plan is not materially different from the original proposal, and thusmy original objections still remain.

The proposal suggests a hugely dense, unattractive, and out-of-character development. Thenumber of units proposed would put a huge burden on local services such as local GPs andschools. Additionally, the number of residents would greatly increase the traffic and pollution in thearea. Finally, permitting this development would set a precedent for development density on themain Zoo site, which is much bigger and, if lost, would do away with one of the main naturalenvironments in the area.

For these reasons, I object to the proposed development.

Mr Chris Jefferies  CLIFTON AND HOTWELLS IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 44 CANYNGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-30   OBJECT

For the purposes of the National Planning Policy Framework the entire site of the BristolZoological Gardens, including its 'car park', should be considered to be a Park. The Bristol TreeForum have objected to the proposals, agreeing that 'this 'car park' is an integral part of the BristolZoo Gardens'. It sits within the setting of 8 listed buildings, including the houses facing on toClifton Down. In 1999 the land to the rear of 4 of these was in use by the Bristol ZoologicalGardens for horticultural and other ancillary uses. The NPPF explicitly excludes from its definitionof previously developed land 'land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestrybuildings'. It is therefore not legally possible , contrary to the Applicant's assertion, to regard theApplication site as previously developed land.

The Application is for high density housing comprising 55 flats and 7 houses, 62 units in total, withjust 45 car parking spaces. Assuming car ownership at 1.75 cars per household, some additional60 vehicles would need to be parked on local streets.

A five storey block of flats is proposed to face onto College Road directly opposite the CliftonPavilion. Although most houses in this suburban part of Clifton have ample landscaped frontgardens, this building is set back only between 0.7m and 1.4m from the pavement. The eaves ofthe roof are some 3m higher than the parapet level of the adjoining houses. Although thearchitecture here is neo-classical and gothic with painted stucco, the architects have opted to'reflect' the very much later rubble stone vernacular found in other parts of Hotwells and Bristol.When compared with the scale and density of the existing housing in this part of the ConservationArea, the same area of land would have been originally developed with about 7 detached or semi-detached villas capable of conversion into a maximum of 28 flats. All car parking would have beenprovided within the curtilage and not on the street. By this measure, the density of the proposed

development is some 130% greater than the historic fabric of this part of the Clifton ConservationArea. Such high urban densities are probably not found in any other part of Bristol, let aloneClifton.

As a direct consequence, the proposal utterly fails to preserve the character of the ConservationArea as required by Planning Policy and by Planning Law.The elegant garden city character wouldbe irreparably harmed.

In addition to the incongruous layout and form of the development, the architectural language iscompletely alien and inappropriate. Further, the 'affordable' housing element comprises one blockof 14 flat, designed to absolute minimum floor areas, with the ground floor flats facing onto a roadwithout any form of private open space.

Mr Anthony Dugdale   HARDELOT CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-07-29   OBJECT

Notification of revised details - 21/01999/F - Former Car Park College Road CliftonBristol BS8 3HX

Objection from Hardelot, Clifton Down, BS8 3HU

We object to the revised plan. The changes made to the Block A design are relatively minor anddo not address the large number of objections from local residents which focussed on the mass ofthe building and its impact on the conservation area.

Furthermore, the reduction in the height at the northern end fails to deal with the problem ofdaylight interference. The revised Hydrock reports states that 'the window in the ground floor flat of50 College Road receives a minimal reduction in sunlight and as there is sufficient APSH andWPSH on other windows in the room, the reduction is negligible.' This is inaccurate. The relevantroom in the garden flat has only one window which is the one affected by the loss of light. Theroom above is in our flat which is Hardelot, Clifton Down, and that room does have a secondwindow facing onto College Road. The Hydrock report seems to confuse the two flats.

We have a further specific objection relating to the gap between the north end of Block A and thegarage and garden wall of our flats. As shown on the latest plan, that gap is very narrow and willcreate an inaccessible void. It should be widened to create an access similar to that at thesouthern end of the Block. That would provide a view through to the space beyond and, with abreak within the linear block, would help reduce the overall massing as recommended by HistoricEngland.

Prof. Anthony and Mrs. Jenny Dugdale

Mrs M Tolchard  9 BUCKINGHAM VALE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-29   OBJECT

The revised plans have done nothing to address the size and inappropriateness of thisbuilding. By stepping back one block and allowing a metre buffer between the building and road isa cynical step by the developers.

Please note the comment by English heritage. Again this building is wholly without architecturalmerit, does nothing to minimise the shadowing of neighbouring buildings, provides nothing in theway of space of amenities for those who live there or their neighbours. Once again this planningapplication should be refused.

Mrs Julia Heckford  8 VYVYAN TERRACE BRISTOL  on 2021-07-28   OBJECT

I objected to this development on a number of grounds. I particularly dislike the designof the flats which I consider to be very ugly and out of keeping in this area. They still present alarge mass, close to College Road, despite the fact that some of them have been reduced inheight.

Mrs Jo Lee  FLAT 1 5 BEAUFORT ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-28   OBJECT

The changes made are welcomed but do not go far enough to address the concernsmade previously particularly about the impact on the conservation area and street scene ofCollege Road. We support the objection of English Heritage and are concerned that Block A is stilltoo large and overbearing.The introduction of 1 Accessible unit is welcomed but does not go far enough. It is the same withbiodiversity, more trees are good but what about other sustainable construction and climatechange measures to reduce carbon and help the country and bristol meet carbon reduction targetsare recognise the climate emergency? I hope further consideration will be given to a furtheriteration to improve this proposal.

Mrs Georgina Harford   60 PEMBROKE ROAD   on 2021-07-28   OBJECT

I write to object to the Revised Designs for this planning application. 1. Building A is still much too high, and too massive for this Conservation Area. 2. Reducing the massing to the Northern end of Building A merely makes the rest of this building look even more oversized and oppressive, compared to its neighbouring houses. 3. Historic England recommended 'reducing the mass of the buildings', so reducing one end of Block A is measly, and ineffective, response. 4. 5. The report by Cotswold Archaeology is hardly valid. This is an organisation that, 'has extensive experience in investigating and assessing the significance of historic buildings, monuments and especially their settings'. This hardly qualifies them as Experts in reviewing an application for new build within a Conservation Area. Furthermore, it has submitted a Desk-based Assessment - implying staff have not even visited the site. I urge you to reject the revised designs for this application, as still being unsuitable for this site in this Conservation Area. Mrs Georgina Harford

Dr Jonathan Bird  12 SION HILL BRISTOL  on 2021-07-26   OBJECT

This minor revision of height at one end does not reduce my objection to the plans at all.The extent and nature of these massive ugly buildings, which are entirely out of keeping with thisconservation area, are still just as bad as in the original and my strong objections remain.

Dr Caroline Overton  5 BUCKINGHAM VALE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-26   OBJECT

There has been a reduction in height at the north end of the block, which makes nosignificant difference to the overall design. These flats are too tall and out of proportion with thelocal architecture.The massive 5 storey block of flats will dominate the surrounding properties. This is a conservationarea. There are no features in keeping with local architecture such as entrances, front doors,gardens and landscaping. This is over intensive development.

We have just emerging from a Covid pandemic and may see more pandemics in the future. Thereneeds to be personal space.

This development will put another 70 cars on the streets, where car parking is already a problem.

Miss Elisabeth Griffiths  5 HARLEY COURT HARLEY PLACE, CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-07-26   OBJECT

The minor proposed amendments to the original application do not in any way mitigatethe harm this development will do to the surrounding neighbourhood. It is still far too tall, crowded,and utterly out of keeping with this historic area.

I remain firmly in objection to this development and cannot see my stance changing unless majorchanges are made, including vastly reducing the height, altering the design and architecture to fitin better with the surrounding buildings, decreasing the number of flats and making muchincreased provision for the number of new cars these residences will bring to the area.

Dr Dominic Hogg  35 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-07-26   OBJECT

Dear Peter

I've already taken a look at the revised proposals. If the only problem was associated with height, then this might be an interesting change,. Since that's not the only problem, then how does your request for comments on the revised application affect comments already made? I don't think any of the comments I have made have been addressed, notably in the abject failure of the proposal to demonstrate what it's required to demonstrate in terms of use of renewables. There are many other environmental issues that ought to be relevant, but are rendered less so because of the woefully outdated core strategy, which is completely misaligned with the expressed objectives of the Council in respect of climate change (and biodiversity).

I would welcome a further clarification on how the comments already made are to be dealt with - are you asking all respondents now to resubmit having looked at the revised plan? If so, I'll re-submit mine, acknowledging the derisory nod in the direction of sustainability which has been made by the addition of two additional trees to be planted, but re-stating the same points.

Can I suggest, though, that it is made clear to all respondents how their responses will be dealt with (lest you are of the view that absence of a further response implies a reversal of opinion on the part of objectors)?

Further, I note a number of respondents which express support for the application do so on the basis that there's an apparent acceptance on the part of many that funds are needed for the Zoological Society. Can you confirm that these will be given no weight in the considerations of this application given that the financial viability of the zoo is not a material consideration for the purposes of development control? If you are sending a further letter in respect of the soliciting views on the revised application, then might I

suggest this is made clear? I note you have letters of support from organisations that include one for which the lead author of the planning statement is a Director. Others say they are working with the Zoo as consultants. These submissions, as well as having no merit in terms of determining this application, are clearly from those who may be considered to be conflicted in their views. I trust these matters will be taken into account.

Best regardsDominic

Dr Stephen Coniam  5 ROXBURGH HOUSE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-07-25   OBJECT

The revised plan does not mitigate the problems caused by this proposed development,particularly Block A.The reduction in height of the north end of the block has no material effect on the problem of lightfor 50 College Road and Hardelot in Clifton Down, and is far too close to these properties.The Block is still too high and massive for the surrounding residential buildings, and is out ofcharacter with the surrounding area in this conservation area.The preservation of this sensitive environment in a renowned attractive area of Bristol is ofparamount importance for residents and visitors, and demands sensitive attractive architecture.The present proposals do not fulfill these requirements.

Mrs Emily Jones  GARDEN FLAT, 50 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-23   OBJECT

Having reviewed the latest iteration of the plans for the West Car Park, we remainseriously concerned.

The latest Hydrock report shows that the reduction of height in Block A makes no difference to theaffected room in our flat. This is a occupied bedroom and the light level appears to be barely withinlegal limits.

From an architectural view point, we continue to be aghast at the design of Block A which seemsto be completely out of keeping with conservation area status. The reduction in height of the endpoint closest to our boundary wall makes no difference whatsoever to the overall impression of anunattractive, architecturally uninspired imposing mess which will seriously detract from the beautyand heritage of College Road.

Dr Paul Main  2 RODNEY COTTAGES CLIFTON DOWN ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-21   OBJECT

I wish to register my full objection to this proposed development on the followinggrounds:1. The block on College Road is massive, overbearing and will turn the road into a canyon.2. The planned buildings are too densely packed with inadequate green spaces3. There is totally inadequate car parking provision. It is wrong to assume that people who wish tolive here would be happy to walk, use bikes or public transport. Most will be two car households.Also remember that they will not have access to the Residents' Parking Scheme.4. This is a conversation area and this development is totally out of keeping with the Victorianbuildings nearby. It will not preserve or enhance the character of this site.5. A significant number of mature trees will be lost.6. If approved, this would set a precedent for further inappropriate development on the main zoosite7. The architectural design is unimaginative and of insufficient quality for such an important site.8. I note that many of the supporters a.) provide a paucity of supporting statements or evidence.b.) live outside Bristol in places like Bradford-on-Avon, Clevedon, Wotton-under-Edge, etc. c.) aretrustees or past trustees of the Zoo.9. I call your attention to the detailed objections of Historic England and the Clifton and HotwellsImprovement Society..10. Bristol Civic Society say they support the project, but object to the bulk of the buildings. So thisisn't really support.

Roger Griffith  51 CONYGRE ROAD   on 2021-07-19   SUPPORT

I have been acting as an independent consultant for Bristol Zoological Society, and welcome the charity's work towards a new world-class zoo, which will see an increase in education, conservation, and outreach projects as well as a significant step change in diversity and inclusion. To achieve these objectives it is vital that Bristol Zoo is able to sell its West Car Park to release much-needed funds. I therefore am adding my support for this planning application. Roger Griffith MBE, CEO Creative Connex

Kennie Hornak  PEMBROKE ROAD   on 2021-07-19   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam,

I have to say that I was horrified to see the building plans for around the zoo. I was expecting something involving some taste that would fit in to a conservation area, but they were hideous.

Bristol architecture Has a reputation as cheap and tacky, and this is no different.

We are no longer living in the 60's where any eyesore was stuck up so long as it was cheap. These building's do not fit in to Clifton.

Clifton is the most attractive area in Bristol, and instead of destroying it's beauty and history, we should be building something that will blend in.

There are also far too many flats as well, and it will cause even more traffic than we already have.

These plans need to be adjusted accordingly.

Yours Sincerely

Kennie Hornak

Ms Janet Askew  26 CLIFTON WOOD ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-17   OBJECT

I object to the redevelopment of the Bristol Zoo Car Park on College Green for thefollowing reasons:

1. This application is premature due to being submitted prior to any decisions being made aboutthe future of the Zoo and its entire estate.2. It is important to work up proposals for this site as part of the redevelopment of the Zoo estateas a whole, especially as Bristol Zoo is an important feature of Clifton and Bristol, which is uniquein contributing to the history of Bristol.3. I concur with all views expressed by Historic England in suggesting that proposals for this siteneed to be brought forward as part of a master plan for the whole area.4. I concur with Historic England in relation to the harm caused to the character and appearance ofthe conservation through ill-thought out and inappropriate design which harms the heritage of thelocality including the zoo itself.5. Relating to the car parking on site, an aerial view represents the housing floating or as asecondary use in a car park. This is not a sustainable approach to redevelopment.6. I urge the zoo to withdraw the application and to reconsider the use of this site alongside theredevelopment of the zoo.

Mrs Amanda Davis  21 YORK GARDENS CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-16   OBJECT

This is a conservation area and the proposed application does not meet heritageplanning guidelines.

Packing people into small spaces creates environmental stresses - this plan is not suitable for analready densely populated area.

  AUBURN HOUSE   on 2021-07-15  

  BRYN HOUSE BURY HILL   on 2021-07-12   OBJECT

  4 WINDSOR TERRACE   on 2021-07-09   OBJECT

  12 REDLAND GREEN ROAD   on 2021-07-09   OBJECT

Mr Phil Brooker  GROUND FLOOR FLAT 11 ALL SAINTS ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-08   OBJECT

A five storey building, without parking or open spaces for the residents is not in keepingwith the conservation area that it is proposed. It will put pressure on parking on the local streetsand the amenities around it. Affordable residential homes are needed in the area, but not at thisdensity.

Miss Amelia Colston  22 HOLLIS AVENUE PORTISHEAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-07   OBJECT

This is a conservation area to start off with so it shouldn't even be a possibility!Clifton is awful for parking already and this will put so many more cars into one area that theparking will be shambles. The car park development will cause so much stress and make thetraffic even worse in the clifton area. Noise and light pollution hasn't been thought about.

The block of flats will be far too big and doesn't fit with the surrounding style of the area, it's ugly.It's not fair on the houses that are already there, they will have people looking straight into theirhomes.

Mr DONALD HAMILTON  6 ALEXANDRA ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-07-06   OBJECT

As a long term resident of Clifton, I wish to object to this scheme for the followingreasons:

a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings and area.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildingsand other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus towork/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Itwould seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. Itfails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, theconservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set adangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mrs Jillian Hamilton  GRACEWIN HOUSE 6 ALEXANDRA ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-06   OBJECT

As a long term resident of Clifton, I wish to object to this scheme for the followingreasons:

a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings and area.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildingsand other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus towork/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Itwould seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. Itfails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, theconservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set adangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Henry Kelsey  GROUND FLOOR FLAT, 3 NORTHCOTE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-07-05   OBJECT

I do not agree with the proposal. This part of Clifton is one of the few true leafy greenresidential areas left in Bristol and bringing this high density, city centre style mega block structureto the area, would reflect as a very poorly assessed decision.

Miss Rita Steele  34 THE CUSTOM HOUSE REDCLIFF BACKS BRISTOL  on 2021-07-04   OBJECT

The proposed housing estate planned for College Road is definitely not in keeping withthe present leafy suburb that it currently is.

I have seen many roads and streets in Clifton already ruined by such atrocious "new" architectureand would strongly recommend that you rethink your planning.

Destroying trees, increasing pollution, more traffic chaos and affecting people's noise levels andtranquility are only some of the mistakes you are clearly making.

Dr Jonathan Bird  12 SION HILL BRISTOL  on 2021-07-04   OBJECT

This proposed development is highly insensitive to this conservation area for a multitudeof reasons, including too tall, excessively massive altogether, destruction of trees and habitat,inappropriate and insensitive design for this prominent site, density of occupation too high,inadequate parking in a very crowded area, failure to meet Heritage guidelines and too close tothe road.

Please thow this and anything else like it out.

We will expect our Green local councillors to object on these grounds.

Dr Gareth Rees  46 CLIFTON PARK ROAD CLIFTON  on 2021-07-03   OBJECT

I am a local resident. I approve of the Zoo raising greatly needed funds from brownfieldsite development, but cannot approve of this proposal which I believe would not blend in andconsequently is unsuitable for this conservation area. Other comments in particular:

Too highToo massiveToo close to College RoadToo many trees destroyedToo little parking provision

Rosamond Buxton  21 ST JOHNS ROAD   on 2021-07-02   OBJECT

Dear Sirs

I would like to raise my objection to the zoo's planning application to develop the west car park, as per the attached.

Kirsty Askew  CINNAMON HOUSE CHURCH HILL   on 2021-07-01   OBJECT

To whom it may concern,

I would like to submit an objection for application number 21/01999/F, site address: Car Park, College Road, Clifton, BS8 3HX.

As a flat owner at 40 College Road I am very concerned regarding the proposed application for the current West Car Park site.

My objection is the proposed development is too large, will impact current residents and is not in keeping with the character and attractive residential surrounding area. 1. The sound and exhaust pollution from vehicles using the proposed new access on Cecil Road will impact current residents greatly. The 45 parking spaces planned will have a significant impact on the area as each occupant would usually have a car each. Potentially this development could bring a further 80 extra cars into the area requiring spaces, this will impact residents who already reside locally creating a noticeable increase in the volume of traffic not just with new home owners but also visitors and reduce car parking spaces available. The construction of the new access road from Cecil Road and the block will impact all residents particularly those on 40-48 College Road, noise, pollution and light levels (during and after construction) will be compromised. The access should be from the existing access on College Road.

2. Creating the entrance to the block from Cecil Road will remove any privacy as our gardens and the rear of our properties will be overlooked from the proposed properties in Block B which will take away our privacy.

3. The design and scale of the development as a whole is unsuitable for the conservation area as it will certainly not be in keeping with the area and character.

4. The appearance, size and position of Block A on College Road. The residential block proposed which fronts onto College Road is much bigger and larger than the houses which currently stand next to it, therefore will dwarf the terrace houses, impacting the privacy of residents already occupying the surrounding homes .

Kate Roberts  FLAT 5 40 COLLEGE ROAD   on 2021-07-01   OBJECT

Hi

I am writing with reference to the above application at Car Park, College Road, Clifton, BS8 3HX.

My objections with the above proposals are as follows:

1. The sound and exhaust pollution from vehicles using the proposed new access on Cecil Road.The access should be from the existing access on College Road.

2. Our gardens and the rear of our properties being overlooked from the proposed properties in Block B which will take away our privacy.

3. The unsuitable design and scale of the development as a whole for the conservation area.

4. The appearance, size and position of Block A on College Road.

I own Flat 5, 40 College Road, Clifton BS8 3HX, hence my objection to the above planning.

Kind Regards

Kate Roberts

Dr Dr.Stefan Cembrowicz  3 SION HILL CLIFTON OPTIONAL BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

This is M over intensive development of this corner of our Conservation area.Development and new homes are welcome, and affordable homes are much needed everywhere.But this volume of development is too intensive for this small plot, and does not relate to thedensity of local buildings. This mismatch will reduce the amenities for others in the locality.

Mr Stuart Lawson  WESTFIELD HOUSE 1 CECIL ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Re site Former Car Park College Road Clifton Bristol BS8 3HX

I object to the re-development scheme for the following reasons:1.Block A is an ugly Soviet style, grey, intimidating block. It has no place in a Conservation Area. Itis too big, does not reflect any aspect of local architecture, makes no attempt to reflect adjacentbuildings. It is completely alien and out of context. It is two storeys too high. It is an obviousattempt to pack as many people into tiny flats as possible.

2.The scheme makes no attempt to provide outdoor space for the 200 hundred odd people who willlive there. It isn't good enough to tell them to use the Downs. People need personal space forgood physical and mental health. Clearly the Zoo wants more space for its animals so they canlead better lives but feels it's ok to pack humans into tiny spaces with no outdoor amenity space,as long as it makes them money.

3.The Zoo's reports on noise, traffic, parking and loss of privacy and the impact on existing residentsare superficial and misleading. These important environmental stressors are glossed over. Itshows the Zoo's contempt for its neighbours who will have to live with the consequences of thissub standard scheme, the very neighbours who have supported the Zoo over the years. Theseissues alone should warrant refusal.

4.The Zoo is it says an environmental and conservation charity but one, it seems, that is happy tofell trees if it makes more money for them. Cutting down 16 trees is their choice. They coulddesign and build to incorporate them. Even worse they clearly don't intend to replace them. Thereshould be28 replacement trees but there are only 10. I hope people wake up to the fact that theZoo will be felling many more trees when they get to the main site.

5.This scheme breaches numerous planning policy guidelines and regulation. The ConservationAdvisory Panel and English Heritage both say it will damage the Conservation Area and the listedbuildings within it and should therefore be rejected.

6.It's time for the Zoo to act responsibly and reconsider this scheme. Apart from their 26 odd friendsand business associates no one supports this scheme, not because we're against redevelopmentbut because it's truly appalling.This scheme shows an arrogant disregard for the Conservation Area, it is contemptuous of theLocal neighbourhood and the City who have supported the Zoo's business over the years. It is anembarrassing own goal for a charity that claims environmentalism and conservation ito be at theheart of everything it does. However those beliefs are, it seems, expendable if the money is right.

Please reject this scheme.

Stuart Lawso

Mr Nicholas Moss  FLAT 34, THE CUSTOM HOUSE REDCLIFF BACKS BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

This is an intensive and inappropriate development in an important conservation area.The new buildings in College Road are ugly and disproportionately large to neighbouringproperties. They are out of context for this, and any other area other than post war East Berlin.The accommodation, including outdoor space, for the new residents is too dense and parkingarrangements are inadequate. The only improvement that will result from the implementation ofthis plan will be to the wallets of the developer.

Dr Pamela Trevithick    on 2021-06-30  

I live locally and regularly pass the site for this development when walking to the Downs. Having had time to look at the plans, I believe this proposed development seriously detracts from the long-established character of this conservation area. Fifteen mature trees contribute to its character which are threatened to be demolished. This alone is deeply troubling when we need more trees to be planted rather than losing beautiful, historic mature trees. In addition, the plans put forward are out of harmony with the local surroundings and buildings that make up its architecture and character. For example, some of the buildings proposed are too tall and the overall impression is of too many buildings clustered together, with too little thought being given to maintaining a sense of space and comfort for the residents living there, or their visitors. An example of this over-crowding is the parking allowance. It is essential to assume that almost all 65 dwellings will require an allocated parking space. If this is not taken into account, the residents without an allocation will be forced to park their car in the surrounding streets, which are already well-used by local people and visitors to the Downs. Clearly, the plans are designed to make this site a profit-making enterprise but I feel strongly that this should not be allowed to threaten or ruin the character of this conservation area. I am aware that other redevelopment plans are being proposed for the central zoo site and hope that if this current application is not granted, that this will set an important precedent for future redevelopment of this kind in Bristol.

Mine & Lawrence Leung    on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

1-This proposal is completely out of keeping with the rest of the buildings in the area. The buildings are much too tall.

2-The over simplistic design which may look good in a city centre in no way compliments or blends in with the rest of this area.

3-This is an historic conservation site and must be preserved for future generations. New buildings must be built with this in mind not simply to maximise profits for the Zoo or Bristol city council.

4-The zoo wants to fell 15 mature trees. The government have waned that1.5 billion trees must be planted to tackle climate change and reach net zero emissions by 2050.

5-There is not enough parking space for families that can not always get about by scooter, bike or public transport.

Dr Caroline Overton  5 BUCKINGHAM VALE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I wish to object to the building of 65 homes, all flats on a small site, the West Car Parkon College Road. The massive 5 storey block of flats will dominate the surrounding properties.This is a conservation area. There are no features in keeping with local architecture such asentrances, front doors, gardens and landscaping. This is over intensive development.

We have just emerging from a Covid pandemic and may see more pandemics in the future. Thereneeds to be personal space.

This development will put another 70 cars on the streets, where car parking is already a problem.

Mr Paul Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the proposed development as it completely fails to enhance orpreserve the conservation area it sits in. Specifically, it is an over-intensive development of thesite, which fails to blend with the surrounding buildings, is far too high at 5 stories of flats andprovides no amenity space for the residents. The proposed loss of 15 mature trees is alsocompletely inconsistent with the areas conservation status. Lastly, the level of parking provision islaughably inadequate since many households will have two cars and this development willtherefore have a material adverse impact on the surrounding area (where parking is alreadyconstrained). If only 49 spaces can be provided I would suggest that the developers limitthemselves to 24 dwellings. I urge the Council to reject this wholly unsuitable developmentproposal.

Lisa Maxwell  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Miss Caroline Stent  WESTFIELD HOUSE 1 CECIL ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Scheme Former Car Park College Rd Clifton BS8 3HX Application number 21/01999/FI object to the above scheme on the following grounds

1 Block A is overbearing, no landscaping, 5 storeys high when 3 is the maximum for surroundingbuildings, it is wrong in scale and mass and less than 1 m from the pavement. The whole schemeis alien and out of context. It amounts to overdevelopment.

2 Wholly inappropriate use of materials eg precast concrete window surrounds, metal cladding,plastic/metal windows, metal roof and walls.

The scheme

3 fails to preserve or enhance Conservation Area (CA) , damages the CA by its size, mass andpoor design, damages the setting of listed and other buildings and fails to meet Heritage PlanningGuidelines.

4 Breaches BCC Planning Policy, NPPF Guidelines.

5 Fails to comply with BCC Environmental Policies regarding Climate change, daylighting,sustainability. See Dominic Hogg.

6 Fails to provide amenity space and no outdoor personal space, no play space for 65households.

7 Complete failure to integrate environmental features into the scheme.

8 Fails to properly consider effect of noise on existing residents from both plant (ASHP) and trafficboth day and night. In fact the reports are misleading.

9 Fails to comply with privacy policies where distances between some units and existing residentsbreach legal requirements.

10 Defective and inaccurate day lighting assessment report.

11 Superficial and misleading energy and sustainability reports. These deficits underline theoverwhelming impression that this scheme is predicated on maximum financial return and nothingelse.

12 Complete disregard for the increased traffic, parking and pollution consequences of thisscheme for all residents new and existing. These important issues have been simply air brushedout of the picture.

13 16 trees will be felled to accommodate more units. 28 are required to compensate but only 10are in the plan.

14 Overdevelopment. UL2 Policy requires a MASTERPLAN , an overview of the wholedevelopment. This should include the main garden site. This has not been done and is a seriousomission. The size and scale of the complete development on both sites must be known andshould be a precondition for permission on the car park site. BCC must be able to make informeddecisions based on the calculated impact of the entire redevelopment scheme. Informed decisionmaking is being frustrated by the Zoo's refusal to publicly disclose plans for the main garden site.

15 Zoo supporters. Most do not give valid reasons as they do not refer to the scheme but simplyassert that the Zoo as a charity needs the money and should therefore have permission. Only 3supporters live in Clifton of the remaining 26, 50% do not even live in Bristol. Many have vestedinterests. As a matter of public record there are shareholders, Trustees past and present, officersof the Zoo, past and present, CEOs of housebuilding companies and business associates.

Charitable status is a privilege that comes with responsibilities. This scheme is nothing short of anattempt by the Zoo to exploit its charitable status to the detriment of its neighbours, theConservation Area and ultimately the City. Clifton is an asset to the City of Bristol and peoplecome here from all over the City to enjoy it. More so since Covid. This Conservation Area is foreveryone and the people of Bristol are entitled to expect that the Council will protect it for themand for generations to come and not to unjustly enrich a business that is leaving the City.Please reject this schemeCaroline Stent

Mrs Wendy Kenyon  7, HARLEY PLACE CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the proposed development of Bristol Zoo's West Car Park onCollege Road. Whilst there is an understandable desire to provide housing on this land, I believethe proposed scale of the development, at five storeys high, is out of all proportion with thesurrounding properties and completely fails to enhance or preserve this conservation area. Theloss of 15 mature trees is also inconsistent with the area's conservation status.

The proposed development is a poor design that is totally out of character with all the propertiessurrounding it. What is more, there is no community space or gardens for the properties so this isover-intensive development. Parking in the area is already a major issue and this proposeddevelopment will create unprecedented problems with new residents unable to park their cars dueto insufficient parking provision. The increased traffic alone will turn what was once a quiet, leafyarea into an inner-city suburb.

I would entirely support development of the West Car Park which mirrors the leafy, open design ofthis area. I believe it is short-sighted in the extreme to destroy the nature of this desirable area ofBristol.

Harrison Maxwell  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Rory Maxwell  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Ms Annette Margetson  STOCKWELL HOUSE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Peter Manning  SERRIDGE HOUSE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Mark Manning  SERRIDGE HOUSE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Adam Chivers  FELIXSTOWE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD CLIFTON, BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

It is with sadness, as long-time supporters of the Zoo, that we are compelled to opposeits plans for the redevelopment of the West Car Park. Our support has always been based on itsclearly stated purpose as a 'conservation and education charity' yet the scheme for which the Zooseeks approval is wholly inconsistent with the basic principles of conservation. As Historic Englandhas noted in its submissions, the National Planning Policy framework defines 'conservation' as 'theprocess of maintaining and managing change to a heritage asset in a way that sustains and,where appropriate, enhances its significance.' The scheme comes nowhere near satisfying thatbasic principle.

There are currently over 160 people objecting to the scheme - some 90% or so of those who havemade submissions. The proportion would be greater if the Zoo had not inflated the numbers infavour by ensuring that certain of its directors made submissions in support (without indicatingeither their status or that they had an obvious interest in the success of the application).

In essence, the objectors make the same similar points in complaining about the scheme. It canbe no coincidence that so many people have reached the same conclusions nor that, crucially,their objections are reinforced in the recent submissions of Historic England.

Helpfully, Historic England has drawn attention to the 'combination of formal Gothic architectureand mature planting [that] are an essential focus of this part of the conservation area [and the]liberal use of rubble limestone and Bathstone dressings on both building and walls [that] alsopredominates and [so] creates a consistency between buildings and their settings.' The proposalsmake no concessions whatsoever to this highly relevant context in which the development isproposed - a unique Conservation Area of national significance

The common features of the huge number of objections are these:

1. The proposals constitute over intensive development. In the words of Historic England, 'theproposed layout, massing and design fails to respond to the character and appearance of theConservation Area'.

2. The buildings are too tall, especially those proposed on College Road and are out of keepingwith surrounding buildings. As Historic England puts it, '[the] robust rhythm of weighty Victorianvillas, constructed predominantly from dressed rubble and Bath stone detailing, is certainly theoverriding built form and the concept of a terraced approach of this scale alongside the existingshort terrace is of considerable concern.'

3. The poor design and over-massing would damage the settings of surrounding buildings.

4. The parking provision is hopelessly inadequate.

5. Amenity space is inadequate.

6. A significant number of trees would be lost.

7. There is no conservation merit in creating a vehicular entrance to the site from Cecil Road whenthere already exists a perfectly satisfactory entrance from College Road.

8. The proposals fail altogether to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. Infact, they would do the opposite: significant damage.

We agree with all these objections. The applicants have made no attempt to ensure that thescheme is appropriate for the Conservation Area. As Historic England has explained, 'While theexisting car park does not contribute positively to the Conservation Area, its open aspect andenclosure behind the high stone wall of College Road is indicative of the juxtaposition of rows ofsubstantial villas against substantial, open spaces'.

The proposals should at the very least have taken notice of the positive contribution to theConservation Area of this wall and the need to comply with the Conservation Area Appraisal, bothof which Historic England has emphasised. As it has explained: 'If development were to be furtherset back into the site, the impact of the development could be reduced and the boundary wallcould be retained in a more meaningful and contextual way.'

There is a further matter of concern. On their website, the Zoo claims that 'We have been througha very rigorous process to explore a number of options as well as taking independent professionaladvice from a range of sources to ensure we are taking the best possible course of action for the

Society's future.' It maintains that 'As part of our extensive review in 2020, we explored otheroptions for the Clifton site, which included other types of visitor attraction and other types of zoos.Working with professional advisors we do not believe that any will be viable or sustainable overthe long-term on the Clifton site.'

It has not however made public the other options that it considered.

The reason for this lack of transparency has to be a matter of conjecture but one possible reasonmay be apparent from a letter which its Chief Executive wrote on 8 April to those who respondedto its initial proposal in which he stated that 'As the Society is a charity, the Trustees are legallyrequired to obtain maximum value from the charity's assets to reinvest in its charitableobjectives...'

That, regrettably, is a misconception. It takes no account of the obligation to ensure that indischarge of its charitable purposes the trustees pay appropriate regard to the overriding need toensure a public benefit of its activities. It is clear that the trustees are instead determined simplyand solely to maximise the development potential of the site to the wholesale exclusion of anyother considerations. The failure to appreciate, let alone give effect to, their wider social andfiduciary responsibilities is concerning.

In their submissions, Historic England conclude that 'your authority would be justified inrecommending ... refusal'. They ask that 'the applicants ... bring forward a wider masterplan for thesite to allow [the] proposals to be considered in a wider context.'

We ask that in their present form the proposals be rejected and that the applicants consider amore imaginative scheme for the site that will produce a reasonable commercial return yet payproper respect to the setting of the site in a Conservation Area of national significance.

Mr S. Davison  4, NORTHCOTE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

The proposed development - in particular the block of flats immediately adjacent toCollege Road - is simply not worthy of its location, an historic and highly distinguishedConservation Area which attracts visitors from far and wide.

The design of the block is unrefined and completely lacking in originality, character, finesse orappropriateness to its surroundings; in fact, it is crude, monolithic and oppressive in the context ofa road otherwise lined with buildings constructed to a far more suitable density, with satisfactoryspacing and scale. Lack of set-back from the road and pavement exacerbates the sense oflooming oppressiveness and 'facelessness' apparent even from the drawings and computer-generated images.

As they stand, the proposals represent a poor legacy of an institution which proclaims itsenvironmental credentials and awareness, and concern for its neighbours.

I therefore object to the proposed development on the grounds of the inevitable damage whichwould be caused to amenity, on the grounds of prejudice to the aesthetic appeal and open feel ofthe immediate vicinity, with its historic buildings, less dense layout and human scale.

Mr Brian Maxwell    on 2021-06-30  

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr John Hatton  4 NORTHCOTE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

As a resident of the Zoo vicinity, I am dismayed by the Former Car Park developmentplan, particularly by the gargantuan building proposal for College Road. The adjacent proposedhouses are less of a concern, although the avoidable and unnecessary loss of 15 mature trees is adrastic sacrifice. (All of this in a Conservation Area?)

The massive main structure is hardly in keeping with its surroundings in a Conservation Areawhere close guard is kept on minor infractions, such as solar panels and replaced window frames,all of which are routinely rejected on application. By comparison, how ironic it would be if such adominating carbuncle is ultimately approved and built.

Specifically:a) It is is too tall, certainly by one storey

b) It fronts directly onto the pavement, unlike all houses on College Road -- not exactly a healthyprospect for privacy or continued social distancing, should that be the case

c) It would invite problems from its obvious population surge in multiples of 65 - several times over

d) On-street parking congestion due to limited on-site parkinge) Traffic mayhem in surrounding roads

f) The sole access point on Cecil Road would be a bottleneck, especially at rush hours, disturbingpresent residents beyond measure.

g) Impact on the immediate community, including the College, would be considerable

h) Private space for new residents would be non-existent or stretched, at best

This plan has circulated for some months with no apparent adjustment, in spite of the adversefeeling from residents AND many Bristolians who CARE about the Zoo AND this residential area.

Many of us contributed generously to the Zoo Appeal, prior to November 2020, in hopes ofkeeping the Zoo afloat in its present state, only to be slapped by the closure announcement.Further appeals would raise the money which is clearly the prime consideration in this matter, butif only to avoid an overintensive development with Inner City overtones.

This area must be treated as the Conservation Area that it is.

Mr Glyn Thompson  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I object most strongly to this planning application for the following reasons:

1. Our property backs directly onto the development site and if the development was built, ourquality of life would be adversely affected. Our courtyard garden currently is very quiet, is notoverlooked and has clean air. The proposed new access road would run along the rear boundry ofour small garden, a few feet from where we sit in summer. Our outdoor space would be badlypolluted by the sound and exhaust fumes from the vehicles accessing and making deliveries to theproposed 65 dwellings. Furthermore, our privacy would be taken away as our garden and kitchenwould be overlooked from the upper units in Block B.

2. Considering the scheme as a whole, I consider that it constitutes over intensive development, isof very poor design and is not appropriate for such a special, sensitive and historic location.

3. The number of new dwellings proposed is excessive. 65 is too many for the site and thatnumber would generate traffic and parking issues for the neighbourhood. The parking provision onsite is wholly inadequate.

4. The proposed new access from Cecil Road is ill conceived. The existing access from CollegeRoad should be used to service the development as it is existing and has a good safety record.

5. All the buildings are too tall and Block A is an ugly block of flats without any architectural merit.It is completely incongruous to its surroundings.

6. The development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

7. The proposed loss of 15 mature trees is unacceptable.

Mrs Yvonne Barrett  THE MAISONETTE 4 CECIL ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I object for the following reasons:

1. Parking provision is absurdly inadequate. No allowance has been given to family visitors ortradesmen unless parking in Cecil Road is envisaged. Cecil Road will become a total bottleneck.

2. The entrance onto Cecil Road will mean cars accessing what will be single lane traffic. Theproposal will have a detrimental affect on traffic flow. The present access to the site opens ontotwo lane traffic and has been perfectly adequate for decades.

3. The Zoo want their animals to have more space at their site by the M4 so why allow adevelopment that squashes human beings into small boxes. The density of units proposed is notsuitable for this site.

4. The design of the properties is unlike anything in the area and is not conducive to conservingthe look of Clifton.

5. The whole proposal has not been thought about in the detail I would have expected.Consultation with local people should have been carried out before outline plans were drawn. Theproject seems to put profit before people, hardly the behavior of a charitable institution.

Mrs Amie Copley  40 LYNDON MORGAN WAY STROUD  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Having grown up in Clifton and returning weekly overnight to my parents address onCecil Road I feel the need to object to this application.

The reasons for my objection to the current proposed plans are as follows:

a. The proposals constitute over intensive development for the spaceb. The buildings are too tall for the surroundingc. They are totally out of keeping with surrounding buildingsd. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildingsand other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Regardless of other modes of transportthis type of family accommodation will mean each household has multiple vehicles (and likely tobe mostly electric in the near future - how is that supported?)f. the access in and out will make the road very busy and impede the access into the driveways onCecil Road.g. Amenity space is lacking.h. 15 mature trees will be lost.i. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

It is apparent that the motivation for this type of development is to make as much profit aspossible, without having any regard for proper and safe access to the development and existingproperties, the surrounding area or the local residents; let alone having regard to local architectureor conservation.

Mr Nicholas Heckford  8 VYVYAN TERRACE BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

How dispiriting that yet again Clifton is being threatened with a massive developmenttotally inappropriate to its site and unworthy of its architects. The picture of the frontage to CollegeRoad clearly demonstrates how oppressive and unsympathetic this development would be, and Ioppose it.

Mr Kim Hack  7 APSLEY ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I have lived in Clifton for over 40 years and I wish to object in the strongest terms to thispoorly thought out development.The development as presented is of a very poor design and will constitute a substantialoverdevelopment of the site as the buildings are too tall, the massing is too great and is totally outof proportion to the localityThe development is completely out of keeping with a Conservation Area and will have a negativeimpact on the area especially the listed buildings and the other buildings currently un-listedWhilst we have been encouraged by central and local government to use a more sustainablemethod of transport, whether it be public transport, walking, cycling or using the scooters there isno doubt that the vast majority of occupiers will want their own car and in that regard, theproposed parking falls far short of an acceptable provisionClifton regularly receives awards for the quality-of-life for its residents and those who are fortunateto work here and the development lacks amenity space and I'm surprised that the developers takethe view that the loss of 15 mature trees is appropriate in a conservation areaThe development completely fails to add anything to the unique character the Conservation Areaand is totally unsympathetic to the existing buildings and the local environment.It seems little regard has been paid to the residents of the nearby homes and the onlyconsideration is to maximise the profits for the site.In closing, this development is more akin to a post-Stalinist scheme in one of the cities in theperiphery of what was the Soviet Union

Mr Kim Hack  7 APSLEY ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I have lived in Clifton for over 40 years and I wish to object in the strongest terms to thispoorly thought out development.The development as presented is of a very poor design and will constitute a substantialoverdevelopment of the site as the buildings are too tall, the massing is too great and is totally outof proportion to the localityThe development is completely out of keeping with a Conservation Area and will have a negativeimpact on the area especially the listed buildings and the other buildings currently un-listedWhilst we have been encouraged by central and local government to use a more sustainablemethod of transport, whether it be public transport, walking, cycling or using the scooters there isno doubt that the vast majority of occupiers will want their own car and in that regard, theproposed parking falls far short of an acceptable provisionClifton regularly receives awards for the quality-of-life for its residents and those who are fortunateto work here and the development lacks amenity space and I'm surprised that the developers takethe view that the loss of 15 mature trees is appropriate in a conservation areaThe development completely fails to add anything to the unique character the Conservation Areaand is totally unsympathetic to the existing buildings and the local environment.It seems little regard has been paid to the residents of the nearby homes and the onlyconsideration is to maximise the profits for the site.In closing, this development is more akin to a post-Stalinist scheme in one of the cities in theperiphery of what was the Soviet Union

Ms Sally-Ann Pound  42 COLLEGE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I object to this planning application because:

1. Our currently peaceful small garden would be polluted by the noise and fumes from carspassing a few feet away from where we sit.2. Our garden and rear living area would be overlooked by the occupiers of the upper floors inBlock B and our privacy lost.3. The conservation area would not be preserved or enhanced by the over intensive developmentthat is proposed.4. There are too many dwellings proposed for the site and the buildings are too tall.5. There are not enough parking spaces within the scheme which will cause parking issues on theadjacent streets.6. The overall design is poor and not appropriate for the area.7. The access should be from College Road and not Cecil Road.8. Block A on College Road is ugly, oversized and looks like a city centre block of flats.9. 15 lovely trees would be lost

Dr Stephen Allpress  33 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I object in the strongest possible terms to this ill-thought out planning application. Thedevelopment is neither in keeping with the local architecture, nor does it provide adequatefacilities. The Zoo should be providing a holistic plan for the development of their entire estaterather than this piecemeal attempt to sneak in this application and hope no-one notices.

Catherine Lang  7 NORLAND ROAD   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Dear Planning Officer

I wish to object to this scheme which does not adhere to the guidelines of the Conservation area in which it sits:

It is an over intensive development for the area of ground;

There are buildings which are simply too tall to sit amongst the many currently listed buildings in the neighbourhood;

The felling of 15 mature trees is unacceptable. Local residents have had to build around existing trees in order to preserve them. Why does this not apply here?

Electric cars are clearly the future and adequate space for each household to park one vehicle is a realistic provision.

Here there is an opportunity for a generous development with mature trees and amenity space for a new healthy community - which is being derailed by an intensive and cramped scheme.

Please reject this plan.

Yours faithfullyCatherine Lang

Susan Brierley  12 THE PARAGON   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I find the plan and design for the 5 storey block of flats appalling. it is totally out of keeping with the surrounding buildings. All the other houses in the area are set back from the road allowing privacy and a front green space unlike the proposed flats. There are no back gardens or communal spaces. Haven't we learnt anything from the pandemic? These things are vital for our well-being and for our children. if we are really interested in our wildlife, we plant trees, shrubs and flowers, we don't put up token bird boxes and bug hotels. Of course we need more housing, but my further objection is that there would be too many people crammed into a small space and this may have contributed to the awful design.

Susan Brierley

Namrata Cecil-James  GARDEN FLAT 49 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam

I strongly object to the above mentioned redevelopment. The high rise flats will not be in keeping with this beautiful/conservation area. I really think this matter needs further consideration…

Kind Regards Namrata Cecil-James

David Booker  GARDEN FLAT 53 CANYNGE ROAD   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,

This is to inform you that I object to the proposed redevelopment as described under the above reference, primarily on the grounds that the high rise apartments nearest to College Road do not fit in with the surrounding buildings to the South of the proposed development and the design need to be revisited to take that into account.

RegardsDavid Booker

  8 COLLEGE FIELDS   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

  PRIORY HOUSE POST OFFICE LANE   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

John Thompson  9 PERCIVAL ROAD   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

Dear Mr. Westbury,

I understand you are the case officer for this proposal and would like to comment on the proposed development on the Zoo Car Park.Apologies for the lateness of this.

( I joined the video presentation by the Zoo management and their advisors and have the following general comments as someone who lives not so far away on Percival Road)

1) The large block of flats on College road is I feel too high, too near the road and out of keeping with College road. I think the large block should be set back further from the road and lower.

2) The creation of a single entrance cul de sac (court) opening only onto Cecil road will I believe lead to congestion inside the development and on Cecil road. Surely it makes no sense that all delivery vans, refuse collectors etc. try to turn round and exit while residents also come and go? No matter what the Zoo’s paid traffic “expert” says about one entrance being sufficient, this is simply contrary to common sense- an single entrance via Cecil road is just wrong in my opinion. I bekieve yhere should be an adopted through road (with wide pavements with grass verges and trees from College Road through the development and into Cecil road. This means that the large block of flats on College Road needs to two smaller buildings and would sacrifice some density, but be would be far more practical. (I was taught at school that one of the big improvements in Town Planning to was the outlawing and subsequent demolition of such early 19C “courts” with only one entrance and one exit! It would be sad to see the

reintroduction of such a notorious feature just to pack in more People per square foot -just like the 19C slum builders)

3) There are insufficient parking spaces for the number of dwellings. The result will be parking on adjoining streets. Pretending that this is some kind of progressive step to save the planet is just deceitful greenwash. The reality is the developers want to pack as many dwellings in as possible-again just like the the 19th century Slum builders. It reminds me of the early 20th century opponents of decent council houses, who argued that the poor don’t need bathrooms because they wouldn’t use them. Not providing sufficient parking spaces on the grounds that the residents will never want to own a car is hypocrisy.

4) I would NOT object to much higher rise buildings so long as they were set back from the road. In this way a higher density could be achieved, without building on a large percentage of the land area. Simply colouring the roofs green on the drawings we were shown as if this were natural space, is I feel dishonest. I think there needs to be more outside space for the residents as we all have learned from lockdowns. More gardens, more communal green space is needed. Otherwise it seems to me it’s just 19century Manchester happening again.

5) I believe that as is normal practice in most countries car parking space should be underground and the space above be used as gardens/green area. Why can’t we so that in England?

6) It seems wrong that the Zoo are not revealing their plans for the main site development at the same time as that for the carpark. This might be an irrelevant comment, but it would be sad that this carpark development sets a precedent for the main site development.

Thank you for your patience if you have read this far! I do not envy you having to deal with all the comments I’m sure you receive! Good luck!

Kind Regards,

John Thompson

Sandra McLennan  BROOKISDE RICKFORD   on 2021-06-30   OBJECT

I am writing to express my concerns having seen the artist's impression of the above and am disappointed that such a scheme could be considered for a conservation area.

It is extremely unattractive, far too large and totally inappropriate and should be dismissed as being completely out of character with the other buildings in College Road. Surely it cannot be right that the proposed new block of flats would dwarf the existing dwellings?

It must be remembered that this is just the start of the 'development', and that there will be far more dwellings built on the main zoo site. If this first phase cannot be built to scale and in harmony with other buildings in College Road, then that would be setting a really bad precedent for the further development.

It is obvious that the plan is to squeeze as many dwellings onto the site as possible, with no regard to the existing buildings on other roads in the area. The proposed buildings are simply too tall and intrusive.

Parking in Clifton is notoriously difficult and the proposed parking spaces are inadequate for the size of the development.

This insensitive development must be redesigned. Surely a competent architect should be able to put forward a far more harmonious plan that would enhance the existing area, not destroy it.

I would strongly urge that Bristol City Planning Department should reject this proposal, and insist that revised plans are submitted that acknowledge the sensitivity and

importance of this conservation area of Clifton.

Kind regards,

Sandra McLennan

    on 2021-06-30  

Mr Paul Claridge  37 LEDA AVENUR HENGROVE BRISTOL  on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

The zoo should ,as garden or place of interest be preserved.Animals are clearly not the solution however this is a important landmark that should remain insome form.Housing is a scandalous low brow solution driven by profit and of zero cultural benefit.This whole development has no cultural benefit to a very important site. I'm amazed it was evenput forward

Mr Alan Wall  1, GLENAVON CLIFTON DOWN BRISTOL  on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

My wife and I do not object to this land being used for the development of mixedresidential properties but we do object to the density and design of these particular proposals.Located in a Conservation Area, featuring numerous listed buildings, the planned developmentdoes not reflect the balance of building to open space elsewhere in the vicinity; theaccommodation is too dense with insufficient community green spaces. Indeed, more trees will befelled than replanted which is environmentally unacceptable and would be detrimental to thephysical and mental well-being of residents and unattractive to all.The dimensions of the apartment block facing College Road are overpowering. Taller than theadjacent houses, it would dominate not just them but also the whole of the top end of CollegeRoad including the listed building, The Pavilion, opposite.These apartments are directly onto the street, making no attempt to fit in said adjacent propertieswhich are set back.The unimaginative, boxy design of the planned apartments and houses are neither a facsimile ofother residences in the area nor a modern design of significance which would compliment them asshould be the case in a Conservation Area.Parking is insufficient.We believe this application in its current form which is over intensive and does not reflectConservation Area good practice should be rejected.

Mr Stephen Simmons  6 LEIGH ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

This is the largest development site which will ever become available in Clifton. Howdepressing then to see such an over intensive and unimaginative scheme which shows noempathy with its surroundings. The block of flats directly fronting College Road will overwhelm theneighbouring properties and create a canyon like appearance.

The lack of parking is a major concern, and the additional traffic will cause severe congestion inthe surrounding area. It is unrealistic to imagine that the new residents would all use cycles orbuses.

It is understandable that the Zoo wish to maximise their profit to fund their new plans. However,having been enjoying their Clifton location for over 180 years, they surely would not want to inflicton their neighbours a legacy of totally inappropriate and mediocre housing.

Mr Axel Nelms  9 CLIFTON CLOSE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

As a nearby resident I wish to object to this application.

To me the mock-up of the dominant building in the proposal (Design Access Statement Pages 90-91) gives the impression of a blueprint calibrated to maximise the profit of the developers, withlittle weight given to long term liveability. The details in the application confirm this. An example isthe intention to create 58 flats, with only 35 car parking spaces between them. The shortcomingsare not countered by any of the lipstick-on-a-pig embellishments. Day-to-day deliveries,maintenance call-outs, visitors, car cleaning and waste collection will struggle with the crampedlayout. Over the years Clifton has absorbed space-limited infills, typically of 4-5 units or fewer, buta hit of 65 units in one plot is way OTT.

I agree with other public comments that the scheme exemplifies over-development, and wouldsignificantly detract from the setting of the surrounding listed buildings. Setting aside anyaspiration for a Pevsner to be able to enthuse over 'a perfect piece of architecture', a much betterdesign, commanding some admiration now, and in the future, would not come amiss.

Without questioning the worthy causes to which the sales value will be applied, giving approval tothis site's development independently of a plan for the main site is rather like trying for a quick winby selling off the original frame of an old master painting without considering the future of thewhole composition. Planning consent at this stage would, in effect, prejudge options for the mainsite.

In the light of the above please refuse the application.

Mrs Christine Mann  5 CECIL ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

Christine Mann5 Cecil RoadBS8 3HR

29th June 2021

Objection to the planning Application

Dear Mr Westbury,

I object to the scheme for the following reasons:

1.) The proposal suggest a hugely dense, ugly and far from suited to the style or size of thesurrounding buildings. Nor does it respect the character of the Conservation Area of Clifton.

2.) The opposed plan indicates that the new buildings will be constructed at a five story level whichis not aligned with neighbouring properties and will obstruct light and cause stress to the currentresidents of Cecil Road, College Road and surrounding area.

3.) The current residential area does not facilitate enough parking for its current residents, letalone adding 65 dwellings, which will mean on average 100 motor vehicles added into the existingarea give or take. If there are two or three bed properties that house tenants or owners you can

guarantee an average of 2-3 cars per household.

4.) In brief, the proposed buildings are over scale, not aligned with neighbouring properties,obstructing light, effecting local nature and wildlife, added pollution, increased noise levelsthroughout the build and upon completion.

For these reasons I strongly reject the proposal.

Sincerely

Christine Mann

  SOMERSET COTTAGE SOMERSET STREET   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

Rosemary Chamberlin  19 ROWNHAM MEAD   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

I should like to add my voice to the many objections to the planning application 21/01999/F for the Car Park, College Road, Clifton BS8 3 HX.The grounds of my objection are1. The number of dwellings is excessive.2. There will be a loss of mature trees.3. The proposed buildings are too tall for the site and inappropriate for the area.4. The development is out of character with the area.5. The proposed parking is inadequate. Sadly, people are not put off having cars by the lack of somewhere to park - they just use the streets.

I had previously been in favour of the sale of the zoo and a sensitive development of the site but this proposed development makes me fearful of what will be proposed for the main site.Yours sincerelyRosemary Chamberlin

Paul Bunzl  1 NORTHCOTE ROAD   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

Dear Sirs,

I am writing regarding the proposed development of the former Zoo car park on College Road, Clifton BS8 3HX.

Having considered the plans, I feel that the proposed block of flats fronting College Road is too big and it would be likely to overpower the street and surrounding buildings. I am also concerned with the scale of the development more generally and the number of dwellings that it is proposed to squeeze into a relatively small space.

Yours faithfully

Paul Bunzl

Rosalind Moreno-Parra  2 FRANCIS COURT SUMMERHILL ROAD   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:

a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Please take my objections seriously and let me know the outcome of my objection

Yours sincerely

Rosalind Moreno-Parra

Christine Stratford-Little  11 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

I strongly object to this development.The current proposed development is extremely ugly and totally out of keeping with the surrounding area. It is such an ugly graceless design that it belongs nowhere in 21st century Britain and looks more like a design from the mid 20th century East European communist block.

This development has been driven by GREED with no consideration for the needs of people who are wanting a home that has space and an outdoor area of some kind, whether it's a communal garden, private garden, patio or decent sized balcony. In this day and age, with a pandemic which will be with us for many years, it is absolutely essential that people have access to an outdoor area where they can sit outside and enjoy their immediate surroundings.

There are far too many flats given the size of this piece of land and there is not enough parking space and it truly beggars belief that this hideous development is being put forward for consideration.

The GREED of developers and the site owners should not dictate what is built on this land. I feel very strongly that it is the duty of Bristol City Council to ensure that any development of this site is an enhancement for the area and for the people who will live there.

Christine Stratford-Little

Mr Richard Little  11 CANYNGE SQUARE   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

I wish to object to this scheme for the following seven reasons:

1. The proposals give rise to over-intensive development. There are too many propertiesgiven the area of land available.2.The buildings are too high given the height of other buildings in the area. They will dominate the street.3.The design of the buildings are out of keeping with the other buildings in the area.4.The buildings will detract from the architectural merits of the surrounding listed buildings.5.The parking provision, given the number of properties proposed, is inadequate and will lead to pressure on parking for existing properties in the area.6.There is an inadequate amount of land given over to amenity space where people can sit and children can play. Covid lockdown has demonstrated how important it is to provide such space.7.Fifteen mature trees will have to be felled in order to put up the buildings.

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:a. The proposals constitute over-intensive development.b. The buildings are too tall.c. They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.d. The poor design and over massing would damage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.e. The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Even those who walk/cycle/bus to work/shop still have cars for family excursions.f. Amenity space is lacking.

g. 15 mature trees will be lost.h. This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopment of the main zoo site.

Charles Markham  1 GUTHRIE ROAD   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

I would like to register my objections to these proposed plans.

The appearance in drawings is of a massive, unbroken, featureless block facing College Road which is lacking in any sort of imagination or indeed architectural sympathy for the Conservation area in which it is to be built.

I have no sympathy with the manifest desire of the Zoo to make as much money as possible out of this development by leaving a permanent legacy of ugliness.The inadequate parking facilities have already been covered by other submitted objections with whom I thoroughly agree.

Charles Markham

Mr Bruce Fellows  12 THE PARAGON   on 2021-06-29   OBJECT

I am writing to object to the planning application identified above for development on the former car park of Bristol Zoo. If built the proposed building will completely overpower everything around it. It is entirely out of keeping with other buildings in the area, particularly the rather elegant houses a little further down College Road. It is simply a very unappealing slab planted like a cliff face just a pavement's width from the road. Where are the front doors, the front gardens? The space for trees? Where is the open space so very much needed by everyone now in Covid times? Where will the new residents park? There will be at least 65 extra cars for the area to accommodate. And all this in a Conservation area!

This proposed development if passed will set a very dangerous precedent for the development of the Zoo site itself. Why is this development being proposed in isolation from plans for the Zoo site? Shouldn't the complete area be planned as one whole development. Is this the kind of appalling eyesore that will soon be proposed for the Zoo site?

Clifton is such a beautiful place for residents to walk around and for visitors to explore, with space, trees and abundant green areas. With the Zoo gone there is the opportunity for an inspired development to enhance what is already here. This is not that inspired development and I object to it..

Yours,

Bruce Fellows

Mrs Lee-Anne Warwick  7A ROYAL YORK CRESCENT CLIFTON  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

Clifton is already very busy and overpopulated. This development seems unreasonablelarge and unnecessary.

Mr Andrew Ord  7 ROYAL YORK CRESCENT BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

The addition of 65 flats is unreasonable and does not align with the conservation areathat we have chosen to live and invest in. There are barely enough amenities and parking for theexisting residents.

This is before the addition of the rest of the Zoo development.

Ms Lara Baker  GARDEN FLAT 12 CHERTSEY ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

Specifically I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:

GENERALThe proposals constitute over-intensive development.The buildings are too tall for the surrounding buildings.They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.The poor design and over development of the accommodation to square footage of land willdamage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit aroundthis area.

PARKING:The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. There should be a minimum of 1.5 parkingspaces per house / flat. - this would go some way to allow for visitors & the fact most householdsrun 2 cars.

AMENITIESAmenity space is severely lacking, Have we learnt nothing from C19. There should be more greenspace for all to enjoy so a sense of community can be created.

ENVIRONMENTAL15 mature trees will be lost in a conservation area.Complete double standards by the council rejects smaller planning applications all the time due totrees removal / potential damage.This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.

Where is the environmental design here: air source heat pumps, solar panels, electrical chargingpoints / Solar PV's, triple glazing / super Insulative housing.NO development should be allowed in Bristol without adequate parking space, electrical chargingpoints & environmental buildings.This could be a great opportunity to build an environmental development within Bristol.

Surrounding InfrastructureThis development will put a huge strain on the existing infrastructure: schools / surgeries /hospitalsAn additional 141 new residents could live in this development - all requiring adequate health carepotentially half requiring school provisions

It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible.

This planning proposal fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surroundingresidents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environmentgenerally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopmentof the main zoo site and all planning applications in the surrounding area.

This development is not social housing or aimed at anyone other than medium to high incomepeople. The maintenance fees on a building with lifts are very high. This is purely a developmentto make all concerned huge profits.

Mr Richard Luxton  GARDEN FLAT 12 CHERTSEY ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

Specifically I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:

GENERALThe proposals constitute over-intensive development.The buildings are too tall for the surrounding buildings.They are out of keeping with surrounding buildings.The poor design and over development of the accommodation to square footage of land willdamage the settings of surrounding listed buildings and other unlisted buildings of merit aroundthis area.

PARKING:The proposed parking provision is totally inadequate. Many household run 1-2 cars.

ENVIRONMENTAL15 mature trees will be lost in a conservation area.Complete double standards by the council rejects smaller planning applications all the time due totrees removal / potential damage.This development would fail to preserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area.Where is the environmental design: Air source heat pumps, solar panels, electrical charging points/super Insulative housing.This could be a great opportunity to build an environmental development within Bristol.

Surrounding InfrastructureThis development will put a huge strain on the existing infrastructure: schools / surgeries /

hospitalsAn additional 141 new residents could live in this development - all requiring adequate health care50% or higher requiring school provisions

It would seem that the sole aim of this application is to render this site as profitable as possible.

This planning proposal fails to have any regard whatsoever for local amenity, surroundingresidents, local architecture, the conservation area or the environmentgenerally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for the redevelopmentof the main zoo site and all planning applications in the surrounding area.

Mrs Kate Holland-Smith  4 HAILSTONE COTTAGES BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I object to the proposed development for the following reasons:

- The proposed buildings along College Road are too tall and the design is out of keeping withsurrounding buildings.

- The inappropriate design and overbearing size would damage the settings of surrounding listedbuildings and other unlisted buildings of merit.

- The proposed parking provision is inadequate. Most households will have 1-2 cars to park even ifthey walk, cycle or take public transport to work. The need for visitor parking and the pressure thatthis will put on the surrounding on street parking also needs to be acknowledged and addressed.The surrounding on street parking is at capacity at certain times of the day as it is, and with thefuture development of the main zoo site (and any possible parking pressures resulting from this)still to be decided, these proposals should not put any additional pressure on the local on streetparking.

- The proposed vehicular access provided is totally inadequate. Having just a single entrance andexit would cause congestion at peak times of the day and cause issues for existing local residentstrying to use their driveways. Changes to the design of the proposed buildings along CollegeRoad, for example to keep the existing vehicular access there, could assist with this.

- Amenity space and children's play space is lacking in the design.

- It appears that 15 mature trees will be lost the proposals do not address the need to compensate

for this.

- The proposals constitute over-intensive development in what is a Conservation Area and fail topreserve or enhance the character of the Conservation Area. It would seem that the sole aim ofthis application is to render this site as profitable as possible. It fails to have any regardwhatsoever for local amenity, surrounding residents, local architecture, the conservation area orthe environment generally. If this application is granted it would set a dangerous precedent for theredevelopment of the main zoo site.

Mr Jeremy Holland-Smith  4 HAILSTONE COTTAGES BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I object to the proposals on the basis that:- The buildings are incongruous with the adjacent listed buildings and the rest of the area, being aConservation Area.- The proposed flats along College Road are too tall and the design does not compliment thesurrounding buildings. The density of development is too great in comparison with the rest of thelocal area.- The proposed parking and vehicular access provisions are inadequate.- The mature trees need to be protected (I understand that when planning permission for the sitepreviously changed from garden to carpark, landscaping and tree planting were importantconditions).

Dr Dominic Hogg  35 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

SUMMARY OF SUBMISSIONI am writing to confirm my objection to the proposal as it has been submitted. The objectionreflects the fact that the application falls short of what existing policy requires.In particular, in line with the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note (CCSPN), becausethe Energy and Sustainability Statement fails to demonstrate why it was considered 'not feasible toincorporate certain measures into the proposed development', then in line with the Practice Note,the result must be the refusal of planning permission. For example, the application mistakenlydraws a trade off between green rooves and solar PV installations: as well as being technicallyincorrect, even taken on its own grounds, the CCSPN offers no suggestion that a decision toimplement green rooves is tantamount to demonstrating the non-viability of a range oftechnologies and approaches that have simply been dismissed for no apparent reason. Thesechoices have ensured that what could have been a zero carbon (or carbon negative) developmentfalls well short of that objective.That alone should be sufficient to ensure that the application is refused.The proposal needs to be substantially re-worked to ensure that principles which the CCSPNrequires to be applied are firmly integrated within the design process rather than as anafterthought.Although this alone is sufficient for the decision to refuse planning permission, I note also thefollowing:1. The need for the development is not demonstrated;2. It is not clear that this site should be considered 'brownfield' - it does not appear on the CityCouncil's Brownfield Land register;3. The application undermines its case in respect of affordable housing by seeking the minimumprovision. Bristol City Council cannot achieve the targets in its existing Core Strategy as long as

developers proceed in this manner (which is also out of step with what is set out in the DraftPolicies Document);4. The Planning Statement selectively cites Policy UL2 in the Draft Policies Document in seekingto support a densification of development. A full reading of the same UL2 would suggest there arevery good reasons to consider that such density is unwarranted;5. The proposal makes no attempt to comply with the requirements of DM16, and it makes noreference at all to DM 14, which relates to the Health Impacts of Development. In particular, thefollowing features give rise to concerns regarding the health of would-be occupiers:a. The absence of space for children to play even though it is not difficult to imagine thedevelopment, as it is proposed, to house more than 50 children;b. The fact that dwellings will be unable to ensure that noise levels are below those recommendedby the WHO at night because of a combination of the prevailing noise levels (even before oneconsiders those generated at the site itself) and the thermal properties of the dwellings. Inaddition, a number of bedrooms appear to be adjacent to 6 air-source heat pumps (ASHPs),exposing them (notwithstanding the improvements in noise characteristics of ASHPs) to night-timenoise;6. As well as the effects on the health of would-be occupiers, the application fails to consider theeffect of noise emanating from the development itself, whether from the occupants' vehicles, ortheir use of the balconies, or any other source. Only the ASHPs have been considered as potentialsources of noise which could affect existing residents. It is obvious that the development will be asource of noise, and that the change in night-time noise (and traffic) in particular (the car park isnot generally occupied at night) has the potential to affect existing residents;7. Last, but by no means least, and consistent with the absence of space for play, and the failureof design to integrate environmental features, the loss of sixteen trees from the site, some of whichare at the perimeter of the site and could have been accommodated in an alternative, moresympathetic design, is disappointing given the stated objectives of the applicant. There is norationale given for the proposals to feel the trees (other than that this is what would need to bedone if the development is as proposed). The logic is that the proposal necessitates the felling,rather than the proposal itself being influenced by the presence of the existing trees. The fact thatonly ten replacements are proposed on site raises questions not only as to why it would have beenimpossible to design the development so that the necessary number of replacements wereintegrated into the development (this would have provided an incentive to cut down far only whatwas absolutely necessary), but where any replacements will go.More detail is offered below.

DETAILED SUBMISSIONI make reference to the following documents:City Council DocumentsBristol City Council (2011) Bristol Development Framework: Core Strategy, Adopted June 2011.I refer to this as The Core StrategyBristol City Council (2020) Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020, u.d..I refer to this as The RDS

Bristol City Council (2014) Site Allocations and Development Management Policies: Local Plan,Adopted July 2014.I refer to this as the SADMP,Bristol City Council (2019|) Bristol Local Plan Review: Draft Policies and Development Allocations- Consultation, March 2019https://www.bristol.gov.uk/documents/20182/34536/Local+Plan+Review+-+Draft+Policies+and+Development+Allocations+-+Web.pdf/2077eef6-c9ae-3582-e921-b5d846762645I refer to this as the Draft Policies and Development Allocations, or Draft DPDABristol City Council (2018) Affordable Housing: Practice Note, April 2018I refer to this as Affordable Housing Practice Note, or AHPN.Bristol City Council (2020) Climate Change and Sustainability: How to design low carbon andresilient developments: Practice Note, July 2020I refer to this as the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note or CCSPNBristol City Council (2020) Bristol: One City Climate Strategy: A Strategy for a Carbon Neutral,Climate Resilient Bristol by 2030, https://www.bristolonecity.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/one-city-climate-strategy.pdf

Documents Submitted by the ApplicantBarton Willmore (2021) Planning Statement: West Car Park of Bristol Zoo Gardens, College Road,Clifton, Report on behalf of Bristol, Clifton & West of England Zoological Society, March 2021.I refer to this as 'The Planning Statement';PEP (2021) Proposed Residential Development: Bristol Zoo Garden's West Car Park, CollegeRoad, Clifton, Bristol. Transport Statement for Submission, Prepared for Bristol Zoological Society.March 2020I refer to this as the Transport Statement.Hydrock (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Planning Noise Assessment Report For Bristol ZooGardens, 26 March 2021I refer to this as the Noise AssessmentHydrock (2021) Bristol Zoo - West Car Park: Energy and Sustainability Statement for Bristol Zoo,18 March 2021I refer to this as the Energy and Sustainability AssessmentSilverback Arboricultural Consultancy Ltd (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Arboricultural Report,March 2021.I refer to this as the Arboricultural ReportWest of England Joint Spatial PlanWest of England Joint Spatial Plan, Publication Document, November 2017,https://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/estates/documents/West_of_England_Joint_Spatial_Plan__Publication_Document_2017%20(5).pdfI refer to this as the Joint Spatial Plan (or JSP)Central Government Documents

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (2019) National Planning PolicyFramework, February 2019,https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/810197/NPPF_Feb_2019_revised.pdfI refer to this as the NPPFBEIS (2019) Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas: Supplementary Guidance to the HMTreasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government, April 2019,https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/794737/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-emissions-for-appraisal-2018.pdfas well as associated data tables, downloadable fromhttps://www.gov.uk/government/publications/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-emissions-for-appraisalOthersCharity Commission for England and Wales (u.d.) Guidance: The essential trustee: what you needto know, what you need to do,https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/866947/CC3_feb20.pdfI refer to this as The Charity Commission GuidanceANC and the Institute of Acoustics (2020) Acoustics Ventilation And Overheating: ResidentialDesign Guide, January 2020.I refer to this as the AVO Guide

Energy and SustainabilityEnergyThe Energy and Sustainability Assessment makes nods in the direction of sustainability but theyare perfunctory ones. Evidently, this is not helped by the fact that the proposed 2019 Plan has notbeen adopted, and that as a result, the Energy and Sustainability Statement still makes referenceto the policies in the 2011 Bristol Core Strategy, albeit that it also references the Practice Note ofJuly 2020 on Climate Change and Sustainability: How to Design Low Carbon and ResilientDevelopments. That Bristol City Council's latest adopted plan dates from 2011 is a matter ofconcern, not least given that during the intervening years, the UK has signed up to the ParisAgreement, a legally binding international treaty on climate change, and the Council itself hasdeclared climate and ecological emergencies, and has committed, in the One City Plan, tobecoming carbon neutral and climate resilient by 2030. It must surely be a matter of time beforelocal plans are challenged in respect of their coherence with commits made under the ParisAgreement (let alone those which may be made at the upcoming COP26). That this proposal hasbeen submitted on behalf of an entity that claims to have such matters at its core is lamentable:indeed, one has to question the sincerity of those commitments.Notwithstanding these points, the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note (CCSPN)indicates that:The following key principles apply to all Sustainability Statements:1. Sustainability Statements should address both mitigation and adaptation as set out under policy

BCS13.2. Sustainability Statements should engage with and address the energy requirements of policyBCS14, the water management requirements of policy BCS16 and each of the key issues listed inpolicy BCS15.3. In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possiblemeasures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into the designand, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures into the proposeddevelopment.4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planningpermission.5. If it is argued that including sufficient measures to meet the energy requirements of policyBCS14 would render the development unviable, then the applicant will be required to submit a fullviability assessment.The Energy and Sustainability Assessment claims that:All guidelines [in the aforementioned Practice Note] throughout this document have been adheredto in the production of this energy and sustainability strategy.Whilst the Energy and Sustainability Assessment does indeed cover some of these matters, itdoes so in an entirely perfunctory manner. The plans to make use of heat pumps are welcome,although the detail of how the demand will be matched by the supply from the six heat pumpsillustrated in the Plan in Block B of the development are not apparent (there is zero transparencyin the way the calculations have been made in respect of the climate change performance of thedifferent measures being proposed, not to mention, the baseline position - no one could adjudicatesensibly on these figures as they have been presented currently). The effect of the configurationon generation of noise for future occupants is also of concern (see above).There is no provision made for any on-site generation of renewable electricity. This is becausepoint 3 in the extract above from the CCSPN has not been adhered to. There is no reasonableexploration of measures which could be adopted, let alone any rational argument as to why, forexample, it would have been unreasonable for rooftop PV to be in place in the development.Indeed, Table 7 in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment - the header for which states that ithas been taken from the CCSPN - as well as the supporting text, speak only in general termsabout how 'consideration of conservation would need to be taken into account', and 'the benefit ofsolar thermal panels would need to be considered against impact to the local Conservation Areaand sedum roofs'. These are not justifications (let alone, adequate ones) for overlooking thepotential of solar PV. These points do not speak to the need to demonstrate why these are notviable options for inclusion in this proposed development. Indeed, there is some evidence tosuggest, in respect of green rooves, that these can help improve output from solar PV because oftheir colling effect: furthermore, shaded areas might actually enhance the diversity ofmicroclimates for wildlife. Consequently, had this been properly considered, the development itselfmight look rather different, for example, in respect of orientation of the rooves.Why is this important? If one reviews the figures in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment,unsupported as they are by any evidence that enables us to drill into the detail of the heat andelectricity demand in the baseline, and with the measures proposed in place, then one sees that

using the SAP 2012 figures (see Table 1 in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment), where thecarbon intensity of electricity is relatively high, the proposed measures associated with theproposal deliver a 33% reduction relative to residual emissions. Note that these residual emissionsare high because the energy efficiency measures are so limited - the measures achieve a 5%improvement relative to what is required merely to comply with Building Regulations. The Energyand Sustainability Assessment does not actually report this Figure, presumably because it is sucha derisory contribution. This is despite the fact that the CCSPN is very clear that this is a figurethat should be reported on, as per Table 1 in the CCSPN, which also states, quite clearly:The summary table should be supported by a written explanation of the measures proposed and afull set of calculations as set out under "Detailed Measures" below. Where relevant, the proposedmeasures should also be shown on the application drawings.These calculations are not presented. Without seeing these, and understanding the limited extentof the demand reduction measures proposed, we cannot tell whether a less limited selection ofdemand reduction measures might have reduced residual emissions: the higher the residualemissions (i.e., the weaker the demand reduction measures), the easier it becomes for theapplicant to demonstrate a 20% reduction in their residual emissions (because the scope for doingso is, somewhat perversely, increased). There is, therefore, a separate question to be asked as towhether the energy hierarchy has been adequately respected.Nonetheless, back to the issue of on-site generation from PV. The Energy and SustainabilityAssessment reports how residual emissions reduction would have been affected if the lowercarbon intensity figures featuring in the proposed update of the SAP had been used:Using the SAP 10.1 carbon factors, it is anticipated that site emissions would reduce by a total ofc.82% from the building regulations baseline.The main change here is that under SAP 10.1, the figure for the carbon intensity of electricitygeneration is reduced from 519g CO2e / kWh to 136g CO2e/kWh. It doesn't require too muchimagination to consider what change in emissions might have been achieved had the developmentintegrated on-site PV providing electricity at zero g CO2e / kWh (and under the current SAPapproach, this might be even more significant because of the higher carbon intensity of gridelectricity that is assumed - we cannot tell because the calculations are not offered up, eventhough, as mentioned above, the CCSPN are clear that they should be).There is, furthermore a separate point regarding the appropriateness of the proposed update tothe SAP, not least in its alignment (or lack of it) with Government Guidance (from BEIS). Theproposed update to the SAP appears to be taking its cue from the Tables which BEIS publishedregarding the Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas. These are published asSupplementary Guidance to the HM Treasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in CentralGovernment, and are used to appraise policies and projects being considered by Government.The Guidance supporting the Tables suggests that where one is considering small changes indemand for electricity, it is not the grid average figures that should be used to understand theimpact of the change (which is what the SAP revision would imply). To quote the Guidance:For estimating changes in emissions from changes in grid electricity use, analysts should use the(long run) marginal grid electricity emissions factors in data table 1.The aforementioned Table 1, accompanying the Guidance from BEIS, also states (in the relevant

Excel sheet):Long-run marginal emissions factors should be used for measuring small changes in consumptionor generation. Grid average emissions factors are used for footprinting.This is not a footprinting exercise: the aim is to understand the consequences of new developmentthat introduces a change in demand for electricity.An extract from Table 1, from BEIS, is shown below.

Year Long-run marginal Grid averageConsumption-based Generation-based Consumption-based Generation-basedDomestic Commercial/ Public sector Industrial Domestic Commercial/ Public sector Industrial2010 0.389 0.382 0.375 0.357 0.501 0.492 0.483 0.4602011 0.384 0.377 0.370 0.350 0.485 0.476 0.467 0.4432012 0.377 0.370 0.363 0.343 0.532 0.523 0.513 0.4852013 0.367 0.361 0.354 0.336 0.495 0.486 0.477 0.4522014 0.360 0.354 0.347 0.328 0.441 0.433 0.425 0.4022015 0.350 0.344 0.337 0.320 0.369 0.363 0.356 0.3372016 0.340 0.333 0.327 0.311 0.291 0.285 0.280 0.2662017 0.330 0.324 0.318 0.301 0.247 0.243 0.238 0.2262018 0.319 0.313 0.307 0.291 0.180 0.177 0.174 0.1652019 0.308 0.302 0.296 0.281 0.146 0.143 0.141 0.1332020 0.296 0.290 0.285 0.270 0.141 0.138 0.135 0.1282021 0.283 0.278 0.272 0.258 0.115 0.113 0.111 0.1052022 0.269 0.264 0.259 0.246 0.107 0.105 0.103 0.0982023 0.255 0.250 0.246 0.233 0.112 0.110 0.108 0.1022024 0.240 0.236 0.231 0.219 0.104 0.102 0.100 0.0952025 0.224 0.220 0.216 0.205 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.0962026 0.207 0.203 0.200 0.189 0.099 0.097 0.095 0.0902027 0.189 0.186 0.182 0.173 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.0962028 0.171 0.167 0.164 0.156 0.100 0.098 0.096 0.0912029 0.151 0.148 0.145 0.138 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.0842030 0.130 0.127 0.125 0.118 0.083 0.081 0.080 0.0762031 0.116 0.113 0.111 0.105 0.073 0.072 0.070 0.0672032 0.103 0.101 0.099 0.094 0.061 0.060 0.059 0.0562033 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.084 0.057 0.056 0.055 0.0522034 0.082 0.080 0.079 0.075 0.049 0.048 0.048 0.0452035 0.073 0.071 0.070 0.066 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.0372036 0.065 0.064 0.063 0.059 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.0372037 0.058 0.057 0.056 0.053 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.0372038 0.052 0.051 0.050 0.047 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.0372039 0.046 0.045 0.044 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.0372040 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2041 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.036 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.0362042 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.035 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.0352043 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.034 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.0342044 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.032 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.0322045 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.031 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.0312046 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.030 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.0302047 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.029 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.0292048 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.028 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.0282049 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.026 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.0262050 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025

The relevant column for the proposed development should be the second one: the long-runmarginal figure, consumption based, for the domestic sector. The proposed SAP figures are moreappropriate for a footprinting exercise, and are essentially what appears in the sixth column: grid-average, consumption-based, domestic. Footprinting of a development which already exists (andso, because it already exists, introduces no change in demand) is quite different fromunderstanding the impact of new development that introduces marginal changes in demand forelectricity: that is the case for this proposal, hence the relevance of the long-run marginal figuresfor the carbon intensity of electricity used.Note also that whilst the figures in both columns are expected to fall between 2021 and 2030,neither figure reaches 'zero' (or close to it) by 2030. Even without the details of the calculationbeing provided, it is clear that this new development will not be zero carbon by 2030. This is ofrelevance in respect of the One City Climate Strategy, to which the Energy and SustainabilityAssessment makes no reference. The One City Climate Strategy has two goals for 'Buildings', thefirst of which is:2030 goal: All buildings in the city will be carbon neutral and use resources efficiently, ensuringeveryone can enjoy affordable warmth in winter and avoid overheating in summer.The related objectives include the following (by 2030):New buildings are carbon neutral and climate resilient (aligning heat provision to the city's heatdecarbonisation programme).There is no possibility of this new development meeting this objective as it has been proposed.In terms of electricity generation, the One City Climate Strategy states:Bristol will need to play its role locally in enabling this national grid decarbonisation. The evidencedemonstrates that the city can not generate within its boundaries enough zero carbon electricity tomeet its own electricity demand. So it will rely on new renewable generation being installedelsewhere. But it can generate more 'in area' by realising significantly more of the potential forrooftop solar PV on residential and non-residential buildings across the city (estimated at 500MWat viable rates of return - only 28MW of which has been realised to date).The point here is that the performance of this development would have been significantlyenhanced, in terms of climate credentials, by inclusion of solar PV, and this is what would havebeen done to bring the development into line with the One City Climate Strategy.Furthermore, the provision of on-site PV could have rendered affordable homes 'even more

affordable' by contributing to meeting the costs of electricity consumption.Given, therefore:1. The obvious benefits of zero carbon sources of electricity in driving the emissions from thedevelopment down;2. The fact that the Energy and Sustainability Assessment offers no reasoning that would indicatethat such sources are non-viable;3. The fact that the CCSPN state that:In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possiblemeasures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into the designand, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures into the proposeddevelopment.4. And that the CCSPN also states that:4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planningpermission.then the application for planning permission must be refused. The Energy and SustainabilityAssessment does not do what the CCSPN requires it do. There is no meaningful test of viabilitywhich has been 'failed' by the obvious opportunity for the provision of solar PV.Instead of achieving 33% reduction in residual greenhouse gas emissions (and 37% reductionagainst a Building Regs compliant development - note, this figure is wrongly labelled in the Energyand Sustainability Assessment), this ought to have been a zero carbon development, are at leastvery close to it, if only it had followed what the CCSPN requires it to do.We note that the Planning Statement (7.51) reads:The applicant wholeheartedly supports Bristol City Council's commitment to becoming carbonneutral and climate resilient by 2030.The applicant - and its Trustees - need to be made aware, if they are not already, that thisproposal falls a long way short of demonstrating support for the Council's commitments, whateverBarton Willmore may claim. If the applicant really did wholeheartedly support the commitment tocarbon neutrality, then this application would be aligned with that objective: it is not.TreesTrees are part of the green infrastructure that sites should, in accordance with various planpolicies, integrate into their proposals. This proposal does the opposite: it seeks permission toremove 16 trees, one of which is described as Category U. The Arboricultural Report notes:Trees Identified for Retention and Removal.It is proposed to remove fifteen trees, detailed below, to facilitate the proposed development. T16will be removed in accordance with good arboricultural practice.Cat A Cat B Cat C Cat UT02 T01, T04, T08, T09, T10, T15, T17, T18, T19 T03, T11, T13, T14, T22 T161 9 5 1

The Table below para 5.7 in the Planning Statement includes the following:There are a number of good quality mature trees on the site that are to be retained, as they areboth ecologically important, and add to the distinctive character of the area.

Any smaller trees that are required to be replaced within the car park will be better integrated intothe development's design layout in line with Bristol City Council's Tree Replacement Standard andenhance the ecological value of the site.The inclusion of green roofs and living walls further support wildlife, and integrate the tree plantingwith other spaces for wildlife to nest, forage and shelter.The wording only obliquely references the loss of trees at the site. The tree planting referred torelates to trees being replaced, this number being fewer than the number for which permission toremove has been sought. This statement masks the fact that more trees will be lost than will bereplaced. The suggestion in the above paragraph that trees 'required to be replaced' are 'smaller'is less relevant than what is actually being lost. The proposal for new trees does not actually alignwith the Tree Replacement Standard.The Table from the Arboricultural Report has been reproduced below, highlighting the treessurveyed, and indicating (through the shaded polygons) the trees which the Arboricultural Reportseeks permission to remove.

There is no exploration of why they necessarily need permanent removal: the report moves easilyinto a straightforward proposal for removal. Para 1.3 of the report reads:1.3 Specifically, this report and the accompanying information are supplied to:- Identify the constraints that trees on and adjacent to the site present to the development of thesite, to inform the site design process.But the report does not show evidence of this. The figures in the Appendices show that the natureof the proposed development was already established at the time the report was being prepared.The aim appears not to have been to identify constraints, and as a result, to inform site design:rather, the report seems to have been prepared with the express purpose of indicating what treesshould be removed to facilitate an already well-developed proposal. The trees have not informedthe fate of the development: rather, the development appears to have informed the fate of thetrees, or at least, that is what the Report leads us to infer. We are all left wondering whether theremoval of trees could have been reduced, or rendered unnecessary, through a better designprocess where the Arboricultural Report actually did inform the site design. Why, for example, dotrees T01 and T02 and T13 and T14 have to go? Why could the development not have beendesigned to accommodate them given they could easily have been at the perimeter of thedevelopment, alternatively conceived? There is not logic or justification: the trees are condemnedbecause the Report says they need to be removed to accommodate this proposal. That cannot beconsidered an adequate way to proceed, and is inconsistent with BCS9 (see below).Notwithstanding the above, in the Arboricultural Report, there is recognition of the fact thatmitigation would be required in the event of removal:6.4.1 Mitigation In accordance with Bristol City Council Tree Replacement Scheme (BTRS) theremoval of the afore mentioned trees will require either replacement tree planting on site or a

monetary contribution for replacement tree planting elsewhere in the area. The number ofreplacement trees, or amount of the monetary contribution, is calculated on the stem diameter oftrees proposed for removal.6.4.2 Calculations of the obligations for the removal of the trees are listed below. The obligationcan be fulfilled with a mixture of replacement trees and monetary contributions if desired. Inaccordance with Bristol City Councils Tree Replacement Scheme the removal of theaforementioned trees will require the planting of 28 x replacement trees or a monetary contributionof £21,420.00The implied assumption is that monetary contributions would be made at the rate for a tree in openground with no tree pit required. These, though, may be trees lost to the locality, and certainly, thewould-be residents.In the Planning Statement, no mention to monetary contributions is made. At para 7.68, it notes:7.68 Eight of the existing trees are to be retained, with replacement tree planting proposed tomitigate against the loss of the trees to be removed.The same statement appears in the Design and Access Statement. There is no mention ofmonetary contributions, and no reference to off-site planting.According to the Arboricultural Report, the removal of the trees as proposed would require 28 newtrees. Reviewing the Proposed Site Layout, I could count 10 proposed trees (not 28). There seemto be 18 trees which have 'gone missing'.The Planning Statement from Barton Wilmore on behalf of its client reads as follows regardingtheir client:As a wildlife and conservation charity, it also wants to give a helping hand to local wildlife.Paragraph 2.1 of the Planning Statement notes:The Society's mission is saving wildlife together and their vision is for wildlife to be a part ofeveryone's lives and for people to want to, and be enabled to, protect wildlife now and for thefuture.This application does nothing to reflect that intention. The charity has five objectives as part of its'saving wildlife together' strategy, and one of them is to engage with its public; another is to createconservationists; and another is to sustain the environment. None of that is evident in thisapplication, made on its behalf. If the Bristol Zoological Society is comfortable taking responsibilityfor a net reduction in trees on or around the site, it should acknowledge this. In reality, though, theapplication as it stands is either 'economical with the truth', and missing 18 trees.In the Planning Statement, as the authors run through relevant policies, they note:Core Strategy Policy BCS9 sets out that green infrastructure assets include open spaces,gardens, allotments street trees and planting. Development should incorporate new and/orenhanced green infrastructure of an appropriate type, standard and size. Where on-site provisionof green infrastructure is not possible, contributions will be sought to make appropriate provisionfor green infrastructure off site.Going back to the previous point regarding the Arboricultural Report, and the fact that it constitutesan ex post proposal (it cannot be termed 'a justification') for removing trees to facilitate a pre-designed development, the proposal clearly fails to implement this policy. There is no reason at allwhy an innovative design could not have incorporated new and / or enhanced green infrastructure.

There was nothing compelling the proposed density of dwellings. There was nothing compellingthe design to be exactly as it is proposed. The proposal constitutes a failure to implement BCS9,and a failure in design.It is difficult to square the stated mission of the applicant with the nature of this application. Theapplication to remove 15 + 1 trees and to propose a number of replacements which will beinadequate from the perspective of the development is unfortunate. It has also been hidden fromview. The Arboricultural Report gives options, but was clearly not appraised of the form ofdevelopment being proposed (had it been so, it would have been able to comment on the loss oftrees).NoiseThe Noise Assessment is inadequate. It fails to consider, in any meaningful sense, the contributionthat a new development will bring to the existing area. In this respect, it is non-compliant withPolicy DM35 which clearly requires Mitigation to consider 'measures to reduce or containgenerated noise'. It is rather bewildering that the new dwellings are not considered, effectively, tobe the source of any new noise, not least at night, when the balconies, which are described as afeature of the development, might be used by residents generating music and noise in their ownright. This is in addition to any additional night-time transport noise which the development wouldbring to existing residents.In respect of the effect of noise on the development itself, it is worth quoting the text whichsupports DM35 (which is due to be retained in a revised plan) in the SADMP:2.35.4 Noise-sensitive development, including houses, hospitals and schools, should not generallybe located next to existing sources of significant environmental noise. Depending on the level ofenvironmental noise, the impact can in some cases be satisfactorily mitigated, allowing the noise-sensitive development to proceed on the affected site. However, the design of mitigationmeasures should have regard to the need to provide a satisfactory environment for futureoccupiers and take account of other material planning considerations such as urban design.2.35.5 Applications for residential development in areas of significant existing environmental andneighbourhood noise will not usually be permitted unless a robust scheme of mitigation is putforward and the benefits of the proposal in terms of regeneration are considered to outweigh theimpacts on the amenity of future occupiers, for instance where the proposed development wouldsupport investment in centres. In general, the following values will be sought for residentialdevelopment:i. Daytime (07.00 - 23.00) 35 dB LAeq 16 hours in all rooms and 50 dB in outdoor living areas.ii. Nightime (23.00 - 07.00) 30 dB LAeq 8 hours and LAmax less than 45 dB in bedroomsThe Noise Assessment states:the night-time noise levels at College Road Façades will be 51 dB LAeq(free-field). Any standardmodern construction using double glazed windows and trickle vents is likely to provide acomposite sound reduction index of at least 25 dB Dw. Therefore, the recommend internal noiselimits from BS8233:2014 and BCC Policy DM35 (30 dB LAeq) will be achieved.When windows are open to cool an overheating room, noise levels may be up to 6dB above therecommended criterion.The Assessment goes on to say:

This [i.e. a 6dB exceedance of the 30dB noise limit] is slightly above the level considered torepresent "reasonable" conditions according to BS8233:2014 but it is not a significant exceedanceand sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected. With reference to the AVO Guide, night-time noiselevels are of low significance and further assessment of the overheating condition is not requiredThis point, regarding the exceedance 'not being significant', is the opinion of Hydrock, the authorsof the Assessment. The AVO Guide (not fully referenced in the Assessment - this is the AcousticsVentilation And Overheating: Residential Design Guide of January 2020, produced by ANC andthe Institute of Acoustics) may be being misrepresented. The AVO Guide does not constituteofficial government advice.Extracts from the Noise Assessment's own Appendix confirm the fact that such an exceedance isnot of 'low significance':Extract 1: Regarding BS 8233:2014 -Guidance on sound insulation and noise reduction forbuildingsWhilst BS 8233:2014 recognises that a guideline value may be set in terms of SEL or LAFmax inbedrooms during the night-time to minimise the risk from regular individual noise events that canaffect sleep quality, a specific criterion is not stipulated. Therefore, guidance on maximum night-time noise levels from World Health Organisation (WHO) 1999: Guidelines for Community Noiseare often used in the UK, including within ProPG.British Standard 4142:2014+A1:2019a) Typically, the greater this difference, the greater the magnitude of the impact.b) A difference of around +10 dB or more is likely to be an indication of a significant adverseimpact, depending on the context.c) A difference of around +5 dB is likely to be an indication of an adverse impact, depending onthe context.Contrary to the consultants' views, therefore, this suggests a difference of 6dB may be considereda significant exceedance.Extract 2: World Health Organisation (WHO) Guidelines on Community NoiseWhen noise is continuous, the equivalent sound pressure level should not exceed 30 dB(A)indoors, if negative effects on sleep are to be avoided. For noise with a large proportion of low-frequency sound a still lower guideline value is recommended.The consultants' view that 'sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected' by a noise level of 36dB(presumably, 51dB from traffic with 15dB attenuation from an open window) is flatly contradictedby WHO Guidelines, which the authors themselves have helpfully cited.It is worth cross-referencing the Energy and Sustainability Assessment's 'Overheating Analysis'.This considers the susceptibility of the dwellings to overheating. It considers both CIBSE TM52and TM59 assessments. My own understanding of these is that these assessments, of which onlyTM59 is specifically for residential dwellings, deliver results which are dependent, in part, on theassumptions made regarding ventilation strategies. Hence, whilst the Overheating Analysisdelivers a 'pass' according to the consultants, it is unclear to what extent it does so contingent onlyupon ventilation strategies implying that windows are kept open. Given the noise assessment, thisis especially true for the second criterion in TM59. In this respect, the Energy and SustainabilityAssessment states (Sn 7.2 fourth bullet):

An openable window strategy has been developed to reduce the risk of overheating in summer inline with CIBSE TM59 methodology requirementsThe interplay between these factors - the susceptibility to overheating and the exposure to noise,especially at night-time, and given also that no account has been taken of the noise generated bythe development itself - deserves much closer consideration than has been given.The plan for renewable energy generation - central to achieving the required reduction in CO2emissions from the proposed development to comply with the requirements of the outdatedplanning policy - is centred on the deployment of air-source heat pumps (ASHPs). The Energy andSustainability Assessment indicates that these will be housed as follows:ASHP units would need to sit in either an acoustically treated external plant enclosure or within awell-ventilated internal plantroom. The current architectural design allows for an internal groundfloor plant room in Block B with louvred wall to allow for suitable airflow.A review of the floorplan for Block B indicates a plan for 6 Mitsubishi CAHV units (it is notcompletely clear whether the room will enable their proper functioning - some of the dimensionslook suspect given the face to face / side by side nature of the layout). It is a peculiar designchoice that these will sit directly under the bedrooms of Flat 53 and Flat 58, and beside thebedroom in Flat 48. Perhaps other considerations have trumped the issue of exposure of residentsin the development to the ASHPs: the Planning Noise Assessment considers the noise fromASHPs largely in respect of their impact on nearby existing residential properties. Laudable as thisis as a principle, it overlooks the need to ensure that the development is also tolerable to thosewho will be living there in future. It is difficult to imagine circumstances where the bedroomwindows of the Flats mentioned would be exposed to noise levels below those that BritishStandards and the WHO consider likely to be injurious to sleep, and thence, to the health ofresidents.There are, surely, better configurations of this proposal which would allow improved mitigation ofnoise. There is no noise mitigation between the main source of noise - the road - and thedevelopment itself. There is, in short, no mitigation other than the fabric of the building. Thedensity of development leads to a citing of the ASHPs which leads to a high likelihood of sleepdisturbance in the bedrooms of some of the flats. Not everyone can sleep with double-glazedwindows closed (even ones with trickle vents) at night. That is before one even considers the factthat the proposed development might, itself, be a source of night-time noise, whether fromresidents on the many balconies or from the additional night-time transport that the suite willundoubtedly generate.Policy DM35 clearly states:Development will not be permitted if mitigation cannot be provided to an appropriate standard withan acceptable design, particularly in proximity to sensitive existing uses or sitesOn the above basis, and given the requirements of DM35, and given also the very likely impact onsleep - casually and erroneously dismissed by the consultants - of having a window open at nightat the proposed properties, the development should not be permitted.Is the Site 'brownfield'?The Planning Statement accompanying the application asserts (para 1.2):The site is brownfield as it currently is a car park and provides ancillary storage. The site is within

the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area.The site does not appear on the City Council's Brownfield Land register. It may also be a mootpoint that the car park qualifies as 'previously developed land' given the definition in the NPPF of'previously developed land' (commonly referred to as 'brownfield'). The NPPF definition is:Previously developed land: Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure, including thecurtilage of the developed land (although it should not be assumed that the whole of the curtilageshould be developed) and any associated fixed surface infrastructure. This excludes: land that isor has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that has been developed forminerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where provision for restoration has beenmade through development control procedures; land in built-up areas such as private residentialgardens, parks, recreation grounds and allotments; and land that was previously-developed butwhere the remains of the permanent structure or fixed surface structure have blended into thelandscape in the process of time.Although a car park could be considered to be 'previously developed land', it might not be so in allcases: the West Car Park is essentially an area of hard-standing with minor ancillary structures. Itcould be considered that the proposal for development represents the type of development - albeiton a larger scale - that the exclusions in the NPPF were designed to prevent. This is especiallyrelevant given the planning history of the site - the proposed development is taking place on landwhich was, in 2000, partly used for greenhouses. This is hardly land that has been subject tomajor development prior to this application.In any event, even if the site is 'brownfield', this is clearly not a reason to give the go-ahead for thedevelopment.Need for the developmentThe Planning Statement also states (Table under para 5.7):The Society is proposing the redevelopment of the car park to deliver much needed housing on abrownfield site in a central location in line with principles of the NPPF and local planning policy.The proposed use will deliver more social and economic benefits than the current use of the siteas a car park.The suggested need for the housing is unclear, and the appropriate metric regarding costs andbenefits would be to appraise reasonable counterfactuals, not simply the one that maximisesprivate gain.Furthermore, by the Policies of the Core Strategy , by which the proposal suggests it should beadjudged, the need is far from clear. BC5 stated:The Core Strategy aims to deliver new homes within the built up area to contribute towardsaccommodating a growing number of people and households in the city. Provision of new homeswill be in accordance with the spatial strategy for Bristol set out in this Core Strategy and it isenvisaged that 30,600 new homes will be provided in Bristol between 2006 and 2026. Additionalprovision which accords with the spatial strategy may be appropriate within the plan period.The minimum target will be 26,400 homes between 2006 and 2026. The appropriate level of newhomes will be reviewed within 5 years of the adoption of the Core Strategy.The 2020 Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020 (The RDS) noted (see Table 1 in the RDS- also, para 1.10):

Since 2006, 24,669 dwellings have been completeThis is the net figure.The RDS also noted (para 1.3) that:At 31st March 2020 there are 2,938 dwellings under construction, 8,902 with planning permissionnot started and a further 910 dwellings on sites with planning permission subject to the signing of aSection 106 agreement, totalling 12,750 - see Table 2.Even if one takes into account only those dwellings under construction, then the target in BC5 isexceeded. Even the most conservative estimate of the rate at which sites with planning consentwill lead on to construction implies that the level of housing need which has been identified withinthe existing plan will be far exceeded without any new planning consents. That does not, in itself,indicate that no additional housing development should be granted: it does, however, place theabove comments in context. Against the policies in the Core Strategy, this cannot be considered'much needed housing'. The need was identified in the Core Strategy and has been exceeded.Housing densityResponding to the view that the density of housing proposed in the development was too high, thePlanning Statement (Table below para 5.7) states:As a charity the Trustees are legally required to obtain maximum value from the charity's assets toreinvest in its charitable objectives.'Value' has never been synonymous with 'price': the whole basis of Government's 'Best Value'regime for local government was partly designed to ensure that contracts would not be awardedpurely on price. The best value outcome might not be the one that generates the highest sale pricefor the land for which the planning application has been submitted.Nonetheless, this is somewhat different to the wording in the Charities Commission Guidance onthe matter, at para 7.6:Most charities can buy, sell or lease land when they need to. When selling or leasing land,trustees must try to get the best deal for the charity (unless they are making the disposal to furtherthe charity's purposes).One can argue the toss about the term 'best deal', but it might not be the same as 'maximumvalue, let alone, 'highest price'. Yet on the matter of whether the disposal is being made to furtherthe charity's purposes, the Bristol Zoo website includes the following:To safeguard the future of Bristol Zoological Society, we are relocating Bristol Zoo to the WildPlace Project site to create a world-class zoo for Bristol and the West of England.As part of the first phase of this new strategy, an application for planning permission has beensubmitted for residential development of Bristol Zoo Garden's West Car Park on College Road.The sale of the West Car Park will provide a vital contribution to the funds required to deliver thefirst phase of the new Bristol Zoo.It would be difficult to argue against the view that these words indicate that the disposal is beingmade to further the charity's purposes (in which case, whatever the meaning of 'best deal', therequirement might not even applyWhat is of concern, however, is how the Trustees' responsibilities are invoked in part as anexplanation for the density of proposed development (in the Table in the Planning Statement thatfollows Para 5.7). On density of dwellings, the Planning Statement is selective in citing draft

policies. For example, the Planning Statement reads:In the emerging Draft Policies and Development Allocations document the site is located within theinner urban (more intensive) zone, where the minimum density is 120 dph (Policy UL2 UrbanDensities). Similarly, the adopted Urban Living SPD (2019) identifies a density within urbansettings of 120 dph.This is a highly selective reading of the policy UL2 in the Draft Policies Document, which reads asfollows:For major development (including at least 10 dwellings), where specified by Table 6.2 below, ahigher minimum net density will be sought on suitable sites in each area.In assessing the suitability of sites for these higher densities, consideration will be given to thecharacteristics of the site and its context. Densities below the suggested minimum may beacceptable where:- It is essential to respect the character of the locality or protect the character and setting ofheritage assets;- Where a proposal includes house types which result in densities below the minimum but wouldotherwise make a significant contribution to the creation of mixed and balanced communities; or- Where market signals, local housing market trends and local housing needs demonstrate thathigher density forms of development are not viableEvidently, the selective citation of draft policies is deliberate, and intended to indicate that theapplication is responding to the requirements of a policy. The same selective citation occurs inparagraphs 7.40 - 7.41 of the Planning Statement. In any event, the full reading of Policy UL2 thatis referred to would admit, equally, of the acceptability (perhaps, even, the desirability) of a muchreduced density of dwellings precisely because of the character of the locality. The schemeproposed is akin to placing a housing estate on the edge of the Downs, which under noreasonable interpretation of the adjective could be considered to be 'urban'.I note that a consequence of this 'maximum value' pursuit of density of development is thatchildren are expected to play in an area on the other side of a fairly major road, the A4176, or an11 minute walk away at an already well-utilised playground. The Planning Statement notes (para7.50):Children's play space7.50 Children's play space is not provided on site, given access to a large area of public openspace immediately to the North of the A4176 Clifton Down. Children's play equipment is providedwithin an 11-minute walk of the site at Clifton Suspension Bridge Playground. Open green spaceto play on Clifton Down, as well as informal recreation and a number of sports clubs and activitiesis available within a 2-minute walk (150m).The Downs is a tremendous amenity, but occupants of dwellings on the site would have goodreason to be concerned for the welfare of smaller children, if their intended play area is either onthe other side of the A4176, or an 11 minute walk away at the Suspension Bridge (already well-utilized). The absence of on-site space for this is incredibly disappointing and suggests theoutcome will be the construction of dwellings that entrench ill-health, notwithstanding the proximityto the Downs. It is also true that any ecological features incorporated onsite - and these have thecharacter of an afterthought (see below) - would be unlikely to be incorporated in a manner that

could inspire the next generation of conservationists (which the Zoo's strategy indicates that itseeks to do).If one makes an assumption that, in each proposed dwelling, one child is in each bedroom aboveand beyond the first (and admittedly, this might not be correct), then there would be 62 childrenhoused on the site. The issue here, perhaps, is not the proximity of alternative space, but thepotential number of residents who have no direct access to play space. In a development thatcould house 62 children, is that acceptable design? Should any development with 62 children onsite be designed with no access to play space?The proposal makes no attempt to comply with the requirements of DM16, and it makes noreference at all to DM 14, which relates to the Health Impacts of Development. DevelopmentManagement Policy 14, which we understand to be retained in proposed revisions to the LocalPlan, reads as follows (see the SADMP):Development should contribute to reducing the causes of ill health, improving health and reducinghealth inequalities within the city through:i. Addressing any adverse health impacts; andii. Providing a healthy living environment; andiii. Promoting and enabling healthy lifestyles as the normal, easy choice; andiv. Providing good access to health facilities and services.Developments that will have an unacceptable impact on health and wellbeing will not be permitted.A Health Impact Assessment will be required for residential developments of 100 or more units,non-residential developments of 10,000m² or more and for other developmentswhere the proposal is likely to have a significant impact on health and wellbeing. Where significantimpacts are identified, measures to mitigate the adverse impact of the development will beprovided and/or secured by planning obligations.Whilst it is clear that a health impact assessment is not required in this case, it is questionable thatthe development could claim to contribute much by way of improving health within the city, givenits apparent dismissal of the need for provision of any on-site locations for play, or even, locationswhere - consistent with the professed concerns of the applicant - the next generation of natureenthusiasts could be fostered. This is a massive missed opportunity for the applicant: there can befew locations in Bristol which would have been as well suited for this, but the trade-off has beenmade: density of development trumps health when it comes to selling land with planning consent.The Council should consider this matter carefully. As the Core Strategy notes:4.21.11 The built environment should be designed to deliver safe, secure, attractive, healthy,comfortable and convenient places in which to live, work, play and spend time. Developmentshould take the opportunities available to improve the quality and appearance of an area and theway it functions. The built environment should be inclusive, respecting how people experience thecity and addressing the needs of all in societyWe doubt this can be said of this development. Why are so few of the trees which are proposedfor removal being replaced on the site? Why is there so little green infrastructure on the site? Thedensification is not only inappropriate to the location: it is 'designing in' ill health.

TrafficIn relation to traffic, the same Table under para 5.7 notes the response as follows:The assessment by PEP has identified hourly traffic flows through the College Road/Cecil Roadduring the day as a result of the development would be around six vehicles. This equates to onevehicle every 10 minutes which would also not be a material increase. The increase in trafficidentified above would also only be temporary until Bristol Zoo Gardens closes in late 2022.The proposed redevelopment Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) is predicted to be 159. Theexisting trip generation, for when the site was operating as a car park, was 206 AADT. Trafficflows are therefore predicted to decrease.There seems little acknowledgement of the influence on night-time traffic flows and noise: there isvery little of this at present from the Car Park's existing use. Indeed, a search for the term 'noise' inthe Transport Statement reveals zero hits. In other words, there is no acknowledgement of whatimpact the change in the timing of use of cars in relation to the proposed development could have.This is an important omission, both for the prospective residents and those who reside in thevicinity. The 'traffic' is not merely a matter of 'who parks where?', but also, one of when the trafficoccurs, and what additional night-time noise is generated by the site.This (omissions) is consistent with the approach in respect of noise more generally where there isscant regard for the impact that the development might have on noise generation. In the NoiseAssessment, there are few references to 'transport', mainly to the make the point that noise levelshave dropped as a result of COVID-19. Noise is mainly considered in respect of the impact ofother sources on the development, not the impact of the development on nearby receptors. Theonly exception is the air source heat pumps: ironically, the impact of these on would-be occupantsseems to have been overlooked (see below).It is very difficult indeed to argue (and perhaps this is why no attempt was made) that thedevelopment will increase night-time noise in the vicinity. This is generally a quiet area at night.The proposed development has the potential to alter its character significantly in that importantregard.We refer again to DMP 14, to proposed UL2 and other relevant policies in the plan that shouldclearly indicate that a development of this density, with the planned-for number of vehicles,replacing a 'development' (is this really brownfield?) which generates little if any night-time noise,and when it does so, within confined hours.

Affordable HousingOn affordable housing, the same Table under para 5.7 in the Planning Statement notes:Twenty per cent of the housing is proposed to be affordable. This is in line with Bristol CityCouncil's Core Strategy Policy BCS17, and the requirements set out in the Affordable HousingPractice Note 2018 for proposals in the 'inner west' part of the city, responding to the significantneed in BristolBCS17 in the Core Strategy states:Affordable housing will be required in residential developments of 15 dwellings or more. Thefollowing percentage targets will be sought through negotiation:- 40% in North West, Inner West and Inner East Bristol;

- 30% in all other locationsThe AHPN (Affordable Homes: Practice Note) released in 2018 by Bristol City Council suggestedalternative means of complying with policy on affordable homes:This new guidance 2018 introduces a 'threshold' approach to provide developers with a fast trackroute for processing of planning applications if they are prepared to offer at least 20% on-siteaffordable housing on sites located in Bristol's inner west and inner east zones. To take advantageof this, developers must start work on schemes within 18 months of planning consent beinggranted. The Council will still be encouraging developers to deliver policy compliant 40%affordable housing provision by considering grant applications from registered providers to makeup any shortfall on the Council's planning policy requirement.The above Guidance is strange given that the Council is currently falling well short of even the20% figure now being offered as a basis for fast-tracking (a lower proportion of) affordable homes,let alone its own targets in BCS17. The legitimacy of the AHPM must be called into question.The RDS indicates that, of the 24,669 net dwellings constructed since 2006:3,557 affordable dwellings (net) were completed comprising 2,441 through housingassociation/local authority schemes, plus 1,116 through planning agreements within privatedevelopments.This amounts to 14.4% of the total.It is clear (see above regarding the need for new homes) that the Council is well on track toexceed targets in the Core Strategy for new dwellings: yet it is way off track when it comes todelivering affordable homes as per the same Core Strategy. The effect of the AHPN - to consentto a 20% minimum figure, and make this eligible for fast-tracking - is odd, to say the least, not leastgiven the shortfall in affordable dwellings, and the apparent intention to adopt the affordablehomes Policy in the West of England Draft Spatial Plan (see below).The point to be made is that in the context of the current performance against the policies in theCore Strategy, notably BCS17, then the Council should be seeking to maximise contributions toaffordable housing (it does not require a mathematical genius to see that a fast-track processrequiring a minimum threshold of 20% affordable housing is not going to deliver the outcomesenvisaged in BCS17 - indeed, it is actually impossible to do so, and the legitimacy of the AHPNdeserves to be challenged for that reason). Given the current proportion of affordable housing innet dwellings, the average proportion of affordable dwellings in new dwellings would need to bewell above the 20% target to compensate for the currently low proportion. This is all the moreimportant given the (in the circumstances, unsurprising) content of developments with planningpermission as of end March 2020 as indicated in the RDS:Table 6 sets out details of affordable dwellings with planning permission, including dwellingsapproved subject to a Section 106 agreement at 31st March 2020. 2,063 dwellings (16.2% of totalnet permissions including S106) are affordable.In passing, and reflecting further on the selective nature of the citations in the Planning Statement,it is worth noting that, as indicated above, the Planning Statement sought to engender support forits proposed density of dwellings though reference to (at 6.17-6.19) the Draft Policies andDevelopment Allocations. The same document indicates, with regard to affordable housing, that:JSP Policy 3 will become the development plan policy for affordable housing in Bristol when it is

adopted later this year.The policy on affordable homes being referred to stated (from the West of England JSP (JointSpatial Plan)):On residential developments delivering 5 or more dwellings or sites larger than 0.2ha, whichever isthe lower, a minimum target of 35% Affordable Housing to be delivered on site is required. Thisapplies to both C3 and self-contained C2 residential developments, including older persons andstudent accommodation.Suffice to say, the current application would be far from compliant with that wording. If the densityof dwellings is to be justified through reference to the Draft Policies and Development Allocations,then the requirement for affordable homes should be treated in the same way. Furthermore, if theproposed development seeks to be adjudicated against the DPDA policies, it should say so: therequirement to pay compensation for above-zero carbon emissions would then, presumably, alsoapply (see below).In short, the application is using selective citation of existing and draft policies to seek to maximisethe number of dwellings, whilst minimizing the number which are affordable.

Miss E Howgill  40 COLLEGE ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I strongly object to this development as a potential neighbour due to the poor design ofthe proposed development and the significant negative affects on the amenity of the existing area.65 dwellings with associated car parking is far too many dwellings for this relatively small site andthe proposed layout significantly reduces privacy not only for existing residents but also forpotential new residents - for example the ground floor flats of the new building all appear to facedirectly onto the street while new residents will be looking directly into the windows of the existingbuildings in the area from a distance of mere meters.

The number of residences will significantly add to traffic and parking problems in the area whilethe choice to make the only access onto the site via Cecil road. Not only is Cecil Road alreadynarrow due to the existing on-street parking, but the positioning of this new road a single house-length away from the intersection with College Road will potentially cause traffic backup whiletraffic tries to negotiate the tight turn. At the same time, this road appears to be the only access tothe site for all manner of traffic, including large delivery lorries and bin and recycling collections.Having seen the difficulty caused by zoo machinery trying to negotiate this turn, I sincerely doubtthe ability, especially in wet or icy weather of large vehicles being able to make this turn safely.The siting of the access route into the development at this location and the very small gardens ofthe houses on College Road means that dozens of cars and other traffic (for example bin lorries,delivery lorries etc) will be passing directly under my bedroom window and those of up to twentyother residents causing potentially huge increases in pollution directly into my living space and thatof the other people whose living quarters are meters away from this new road, the only access tothe site for 60 cars.

The design of the new buildings bears no relation to the existing, highly distinctive architecture.

The existing houses on the same street are characterised by sloping bow windows, gabled roofsand red brick and sandstone. The new development completely ignores this aesthetic and ischaracterised by grim, grey brick and blunt, broad rectangles, completely destroying thearchitectural character of the street.The last two years have brought home the importance of community as well as the importance ofaccess to green space and outdoor space.

This development provides no sense of community, only private ownership of dwellings and land.In fact taking away an important local amenity and cramming in such a huge number of newhouses with the associated traffic problems, pollution and overcrowding may will reducecommunity cohesion between existing residents and new residents. At the same time, despitepromises provide every new resident with access to 'outside' space, such access is restricted tothose purchasing one of the houses and those living on the ground floor since only these residentsget a garden. Anyone who for reasons of security or cost lives on one of the upper floors is given abalcony, which apparently equates to a full garden. It would be perfectly feasible on this site toreduce the number of dwellings and car parking spaces and use one of the projecting 'odd' partsof the site to create a full community garden, which would allow space for all the residents to cometogether to enjoy outdoor space which could provide space for picnics, for children to play and forresidents to meet each other and enjoy not only outdoor green space but also each other'scompany. This area could be planted in such a way as to enhance the conservation aspects. It iswell known for example that small, single household gardens for example are unsuitable habitatsfor hedgehogs which are now seriously endangered and overly regimented gardens contribute tothe decline in garden birds, insects and amphibians. A community garden could well provide avaluable habitat for all sorts of wildlife and act as another driver of community.The massive over-intensification of the development could well add to existing difficulties ofdrainage. Already poor drainage and sewers mean that when it rains (even only slightly) largepuddles form at the corner of College Road and Cecil Road. The addition of new houses and theresulting run-off from the roofs could add significantly to this problem causing even bigger puddlesand more difficulty for pedestrians attempting to walk along submerged and narrowed pavementswithout being drenched by passing cars.

All in all, this development seems poorly thought out, badly planned and completely out ifcharacter with the local area. Instead of planning a thoughtful development in keeping with thezoo's ideals of conservation and living in harmony with nature, the development attempts to cramin as many people as possible in buildings unsuited to the area and with no plans to provide areplacement for the important amenity and community hub that they are taking away.

Mr William Reeve  COTE COTTAGE LITFIELD ROAD BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

How on earth can a City that promotes Green Living overlook that these flats are beingproposed purely make money for the Zoo and Developers?

The properties are not proposing adequate individual outdoor green space for the residents andthere's no future planning for environmental issues such as electric cars. In reality 65 expensivedwelling residents are going to have cars. Let's not pretend a bike rack and bus stop will resolvethis. In ten years we will run electric cars. What are the developers supplying for future demands?Nothing. Of course it's more profit if they selfishly shift the cars to an already congested CV streetarea and think about today's profits rather than the City's future.

Surely in 2020's every new home built should come with a parking bay with electric chargingfacilities partly powered by natural solar and wind energy. They should without fail, supplywellbeing outside space in a green area to mirror that of Clifton Village. The proposal is also not inkeeping with its surroundings. Underground parking would obviously eat in to any profit and that'swhat this is all about. There is no benefit to anyone apart from the profit made from these buildingsby those proposing it. Greed and profit over over intensive development and the environment.There's no sign of conservation which is shocking in 2021 in Bristol.

Clifton is desirable because of it's architectural beauty and leafy green landscape. What on earthis this development doing to add to this? It will result in the area decreasing in beauty and causingissues for present residents. Clifton is world famous and attracts commercial tourists for a reason,keep it that way.

Mrs Georgina Harford  60 PEMBROKE ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I write to object to this planning application on several grounds, principally that it fails toeither enhance, or even preserve this Conservation Area:

- height of block of flats - 5 storeys is too high- building right up to the pavement - is not in keeping with local houses- over intensive development - 65 units does not allow for even modest communal gardens, andloss of 15 mature trees- insufficient parking provision: spaces for 49 cars, but housing for 65 people

I live in Pembroke Road, and was disappointed that my application for solar panels was refused asthis is a Conservation Area. But the current application for housing on the zoo car park is of acompletely different scale of violation of conservation area restrictions.

Georgina Harford

Mr David Singleton  2 BUCKINGHAM VALE CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I object strongly to this application. It does not fit well with its environment, and as aneighbour, I believe the car parking will overflow into my road, and make it extremely difficult topark and access my house. I believe that there should be one application detailing the wholeproposal for development of the Zoo and its grounds, otherwise a staged approach does not allowthe full impact to be seen or guaged.

Mrs Virginia Rome  26 ALL SAINTS ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I strongly object to this development. Where are the residents of this development goingto park? Parking in Clifton is already a nightmare. The proposed building is completely out ofkeeping with Clifton.

Mrs Jacqui Vallance  2 COLLEGE FIELDS BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I object to the height and proximity to the road of Block A and the overall density of thedevelopment. It neither preserves or enhances the conservation area and would have adetrimental effect on the character of the immediate area.

Mr Marco Maestri  9 ALEXANDRA ROAD CLIFTON BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

I would like to object to this planning application on the grounds that this monstrosity ofa building will be built in a protected conservation area.The roads surrounding will have further parking issues with extra vehicles of residents and visitors.

Matthew Barrett  6 OAKFIELD PLACE   on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

Comment: I wish to object to this scheme for the following reasons:

A. Completely ridiculous number of properties being built. Increasing the number of cars and people in a conversation area drastically. Increasing pollution and road traffic right next to a school. Likely to lead to accidents involving children.

B. Buildings are completely out of keeping with the area. Constructions such as the one proposed damage the look of Bristol and it's reputation. This has economic effects on the vast majority of the people that fund the local council.

C. The council and planning department are meant to service and support all of Bristol's residents not just a select group of very wealthy property developers. The political landscape of Bristol (elected MP's and councillors) clearly shows that the democratic will of the people of Bristol is that we do not support the enriching of the few to the detriment of the many. Therefore we all hope that the council will act accordingly.

D. There isn't the parking provision locally. 100's of applications elsewhere in Bristol have been rejected on this basis alone.

E. There are hundreds of brown field sites within Bristol that could be better used for Bristol's housing needs. Let's use Brownfield sites instead, I can provide you with a list if you don't have one. This is better for the environment and for Bristol.

F. 15 meter trees will be cut down. This is completely unacceptable and not in keeping with the clear democratic mandate that the council has been given by the people of Bristol.

G. Whenever plans of this nature are put forward these days they are always given a veneer of being "environmentally friendly" and providing "affordable housing". We all know that this is just a way that the property developers tick boxes with the council so they can build massive construction, in inappropriate areas and put rabbit hut flats in to make as much money as possible. The reality is that this is an environmental disaster and the few "affordable flats" will be sold off for large

profit as soon as possible.

Kind regards,

Matt

Fergus & Mary Lyons  NO ADDRESS   on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

We wish to strongly object to this application on the grounds on the grounds that it is far too dense ,inappropriate for the immediate aria and a very ugly appearance abutting the road.

Fergus & Mary Lyons

David Burston (Burston Cook)  LEWINS HOUSE NARROW LEWINS MEAD   on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

Dear Sir/Madam,

I write to object to the proposed development of the zoo car park in it's current form in terms of, inter alia:

o the massing and scale of the proposed apartment buildings in a conservation area giving the appearance of a development from the post war Soviet Bloc era;

o the overbearing design in a relatively narrow street scene;o the loss of 15 mature trees at a time when environmental issues are being

highlighted daily;o the lack of amenity space for residents ando The lack of residents car parking, the cost of the units in this development will

mean they will not sell to first time buyers but more likely to downsizers who will own at least one car (albeit electric in coming years and will also require an electric charging point)

I hope that the planning officer will be looking at this application with a critical eye and have cognisance of previous developments in Clifton in terms of design, scale and concept of future living.

Your faithfully

David Burston FRICS

  GLENAVON RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION LIMITED   on 2021-06-28   SUPPORT

  SOMERSET COTTAGE SOMERSET STREET   on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

  35 CANYNGE SQUARE BRISTOL  on 2021-06-28   OBJECT

traffic) in particular (the car park is not generally occupied at night) has the potential to

affect existing residents;

7. Last, but by no means least, and consistent with the absence of space for play, and the

failure of design to integrate environmental features, the loss of sixteen trees from the site,

some of which are at the perimeter of the site and could have been accommodated in an

alternative, more sympathetic design, is disappointing given the stated objectives of the

applicant. There is no rationale given for the proposals to feel the trees (other than that this

is what would need to be done if the development is as proposed). The logic is that the

proposal necessitates the felling, rather than the proposal itself being influenced by the

presence of the existing trees. The fact that only ten replacements are proposed on site

raises questions not only as to why it would have been impossible to design the

development so that the necessary number of replacements were integrated into the

development (this would have provided an incentive to cut down far only what was

absolutely necessary), but where any replacements will go.

More detail is offered below.

DETAILED SUBMISSION

I make reference to the following documents:

City Council Documents

Bristol City Council (2011) Bristol Development Framework: Core Strategy, Adopted June 2011.

I refer to this as The Core Strategy

Bristol City Council (2020) Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020, u.d..

I refer to this as The RDS

Bristol City Council (2014) Site Allocations and Development Management Policies: Local Plan,

Adopted July 2014.

I refer to this as the SADMP,

Bristol City Council (2019|) Bristol Local Plan Review: Draft Policies and Development Allocations –

Consultation, March 2019

https://www.bristol.gov.uk/documents/20182/34536/Local+Plan+Review+-

+Draft+Policies+and+Development+Allocations+-+Web.pdf/2077eef6-c9ae-3582-e921-

b5d846762645

I refer to this as the Draft Policies and Development Allocations, or Draft DPDA

Bristol City Council (2018) Affordable Housing: Practice Note, April 2018

I refer to this as Affordable Housing Practice Note, or AHPN.

Bristol City Council (2020) Climate Change and Sustainability: How to design low carbon and resilient

developments: Practice Note, July 2020

I refer to this as the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note or CCSPN

Bristol City Council (2020) Bristol: One City Climate Strategy: A Strategy for a Carbon Neutral, Climate

Resilient Bristol by 2030, https://www.bristolonecity.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/one-city-

climate-strategy.pdf

Documents Submitted by the Applicant

Barton Willmore (2021) Planning Statement: West Car Park of Bristol Zoo Gardens, College Road,

Clifton, Report on behalf of Bristol, Clifton & West of England Zoological Society, March 2021.

I refer to this as ‘The Planning Statement’;

PEP (2021) Proposed Residential Development: Bristol Zoo Garden’s West Car Park, College Road,

Clifton, Bristol. Transport Statement for Submission, Prepared for Bristol Zoological Society. March

2020

I refer to this as the Transport Statement.

Hydrock (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Planning Noise Assessment Report For Bristol Zoo

Gardens, 26 March 2021

I refer to this as the Noise Assessment

Hydrock (2021) Bristol Zoo - West Car Park: Energy and Sustainability Statement for Bristol Zoo, 18

March 2021

I refer to this as the Energy and Sustainability Assessment

Silverback Arboricultural Consultancy Ltd (2021) West Car Park, Bristol Zoo: Arboricultural Report,

March 2021.

I refer to this as the Arboricultural Report

West of England Joint Spatial Plan

West of England Joint Spatial Plan, Publication Document, November 2017,

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-

library/sites/estates/documents/West_of_England_Joint_Spatial_Plan__Publication_Document_201

7%20(5).pdf

I refer to this as the Joint Spatial Plan (or JSP)

Central Government Documents

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (2019) National Planning Policy

Framework, February 2019,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/810197/NPPF_Feb_2019_revised.pdf

I refer to this as the NPPF

BEIS (2019) Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas: Supplementary Guidance to the HM

Treasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government, April 2019,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/794737/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-emissions-for-appraisal-2018.pdf

as well as associated data tables, downloadable from

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/valuation-of-energy-use-and-greenhouse-gas-

emissions-for-appraisal

Others

Charity Commission for England and Wales (u.d.) Guidance: The essential trustee: what you need to

know, what you need to do,

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file

/866947/CC3_feb20.pdf

I refer to this as The Charity Commission Guidance

ANC and the Institute of Acoustics (2020) Acoustics Ventilation And Overheating: Residential Design

Guide, January 2020.

I refer to this as the AVO Guide

Energy and Sustainability

Energy

The Energy and Sustainability Assessment makes nods in the direction of sustainability but they are

perfunctory ones. Evidently, this is not helped by the fact that the proposed 2019 Plan has not been

adopted, and that as a result, the Energy and Sustainability Statement still makes reference to the

policies in the 2011 Bristol Core Strategy, albeit that it also references the Practice Note of July 2020

on Climate Change and Sustainability: How to Design Low Carbon and Resilient Developments. That

Bristol City Council’s latest adopted plan dates from 2011 is a matter of concern, not least given that

during the intervening years, the UK has signed up to the Paris Agreement, a legally binding

international treaty on climate change, and the Council itself has declared climate and ecological

emergencies, and has committed, in the One City Plan, to becoming carbon neutral and climate

resilient by 2030. It must surely be a matter of time before local plans are challenged in respect of

their coherence with commits made under the Paris Agreement (let alone those which may be made

at the upcoming COP26). That this proposal has been submitted on behalf of an entity that claims to

have such matters at its core is lamentable: indeed, one has to question the sincerity of those

commitments.

Notwithstanding these points, the Climate Change and Sustainability Practice Note (CCSPN) indicates

that:

The following key principles apply to all Sustainability Statements:

1. Sustainability Statements should address both mitigation and adaptation as set out under

policy BCS13.

2. Sustainability Statements should engage with and address the energy requirements of

policy BCS14, the water management requirements of policy BCS16 and each of the key

issues listed in policy BCS15.

3. In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possible

measures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into the

design and, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures into the

proposed development.

4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planning

permission.

5. If it is argued that including sufficient measures to meet the energy requirements of policy

BCS14 would render the development unviable, then the applicant will be required to submit

a full viability assessment.

The Energy and Sustainability Assessment claims that:

All guidelines [in the aforementioned Practice Note] throughout this document have been

adhered to in the production of this energy and sustainability strategy.

Whilst the Energy and Sustainability Assessment does indeed cover some of these matters, it does

so in an entirely perfunctory manner. The plans to make use of heat pumps are welcome, although

the detail of how the demand will be matched by the supply from the six heat pumps illustrated in

the Plan in Block B of the development are not apparent (there is zero transparency in the way the

calculations have been made in respect of the climate change performance of the different

measures being proposed, not to mention, the baseline position – no one could adjudicate sensibly

on these figures as they have been presented currently). The effect of the configuration on

generation of noise for future occupants is also of concern (see above).

There is no provision made for any on-site generation of renewable electricity. This is because point

3 in the extract above from the CCSPN has not been adhered to. There is no reasonable exploration

of measures which could be adopted, let alone any rational argument as to why, for example, it

would have been unreasonable for rooftop PV to be in place in the development. Indeed, Table 7 in

the Energy and Sustainability Assessment – the header for which states that it has been taken from

the CCSPN – as well as the supporting text, speak only in general terms about how ‘consideration of

conservation would need to be taken into account’, and ‘the benefit of solar thermal panels would

need to be considered against impact to the local Conservation Area and sedum roofs’.1 These are

not justifications (let alone, adequate ones) for overlooking the potential of solar PV. These points

do not speak to the need to demonstrate why these are not viable options for inclusion in this

proposed development. Indeed, there is some evidence to suggest, in respect of green rooves, that

these can help improve output from solar PV because of their colling effect: furthermore, shaded

areas might actually enhance the diversity of microclimates for wildlife. Consequently, had this been

properly considered, the development itself might look rather different, for example, in respect of

orientation of the rooves.

Why is this important? If one reviews the figures in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment,

unsupported as they are by any evidence that enables us to drill into the detail of the heat and

electricity demand in the baseline, and with the measures proposed in place, then one sees that

using the SAP 2012 figures (see Table 1 in the Energy and Sustainability Assessment), where the

carbon intensity of electricity is relatively high, the proposed measures associated with the proposal

deliver a 33% reduction relative to residual emissions. Note that these residual emissions are high

because the energy efficiency measures are so limited – the measures achieve a 5% improvement

relative to what is required merely to comply with Building Regulations. The Energy and

Sustainability Assessment does not actually report this Figure, presumably because it is such a

derisory contribution. This is despite the fact that the CCSPN is very clear that this is a figure that

should be reported on, as per Table 1 in the CCSPN, which also states, quite clearly:

The summary table should be supported by a written explanation of the measures proposed

and a full set of calculations as set out under “Detailed Measures” below. Where relevant,

the proposed measures should also be shown on the application drawings.

These calculations are not presented. Without seeing these, and understanding the limited extent of

the demand reduction measures proposed, we cannot tell whether a less limited selection of

1 As a separate point, in terms of the design of the proposed buildings, one might reasonably expect, when new developments are proposed, that whether in a conservation area or any other location, the design of the buildings might actually consider how beneficial attributes, such a rooftop PV, can be integrated so that they are acceptable. Instead, the possibility is described and then rejected out of hand.

demand reduction measures might have reduced residual emissions: the higher the residual

emissions (i.e., the weaker the demand reduction measures), the easier it becomes for the applicant

to demonstrate a 20% reduction in their residual emissions (because the scope for doing so is,

somewhat perversely, increased). There is, therefore, a separate question to be asked as to whether

the energy hierarchy has been adequately respected.

Nonetheless, back to the issue of on-site generation from PV. The Energy and Sustainability

Assessment reports how residual emissions reduction would have been affected if the lower carbon

intensity figures featuring in the proposed update of the SAP had been used:

Using the SAP 10.1 carbon factors, it is anticipated that site emissions would reduce by a

total of c.82% from the building regulations baseline.

The main change here is that under SAP 10.1, the figure for the carbon intensity of electricity

generation is reduced from 519g CO2e / kWh to 136g CO2e/kWh. It doesn’t require too much

imagination to consider what change in emissions might have been achieved had the development

integrated on-site PV providing electricity at zero g CO2e / kWh (and under the current SAP approach,

this might be even more significant because of the higher carbon intensity of grid electricity that is

assumed – we cannot tell because the calculations are not offered up, even though, as mentioned

above, the CCSPN are clear that they should be).

There is, furthermore a separate point regarding the appropriateness of the proposed update to the

SAP, not least in its alignment (or lack of it) with Government Guidance (from BEIS). The proposed

update to the SAP appears to be taking its cue from the Tables which BEIS published regarding the

Valuation Of Energy Use And Greenhouse Gas. These are published as Supplementary Guidance to

the HM Treasury Green Book on Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government, and are used to

appraise policies and projects being considered by Government. The Guidance supporting the Tables

suggests that where one is considering small changes in demand for electricity, it is not the grid

average figures that should be used to understand the impact of the change (which is what the SAP

revision would imply). To quote the Guidance:

For estimating changes in emissions from changes in grid electricity use, analysts should use

the (long run) marginal grid electricity emissions factors in data table 1.

The aforementioned Table 1, accompanying the Guidance from BEIS, also states (in the relevant

Excel sheet):

Long-run marginal emissions factors should be used for measuring small changes in

consumption or generation. Grid average emissions factors are used for footprinting.

This is not a footprinting exercise: the aim is to understand the consequences of new development

that introduces a change in demand for electricity.

An extract from Table 1, from BEIS, is shown below.

Year

Long-run marginal Grid average

Consumption-based Generation-

based

Consumption-based Generation-

based

Domestic Commercial/ Public sector Industrial Domestic

Commercial/ Public sector Industrial

2010 0.389 0.382 0.375 0.357 0.501 0.492 0.483 0.460

2011 0.384 0.377 0.370 0.350 0.485 0.476 0.467 0.443

2012 0.377 0.370 0.363 0.343 0.532 0.523 0.513 0.485

2013 0.367 0.361 0.354 0.336 0.495 0.486 0.477 0.452

2014 0.360 0.354 0.347 0.328 0.441 0.433 0.425 0.402

2015 0.350 0.344 0.337 0.320 0.369 0.363 0.356 0.337

2016 0.340 0.333 0.327 0.311 0.291 0.285 0.280 0.266

2017 0.330 0.324 0.318 0.301 0.247 0.243 0.238 0.226

2018 0.319 0.313 0.307 0.291 0.180 0.177 0.174 0.165

2019 0.308 0.302 0.296 0.281 0.146 0.143 0.141 0.133

2020 0.296 0.290 0.285 0.270 0.141 0.138 0.135 0.128

2021 0.283 0.278 0.272 0.258 0.115 0.113 0.111 0.105

2022 0.269 0.264 0.259 0.246 0.107 0.105 0.103 0.098

2023 0.255 0.250 0.246 0.233 0.112 0.110 0.108 0.102

2024 0.240 0.236 0.231 0.219 0.104 0.102 0.100 0.095

2025 0.224 0.220 0.216 0.205 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.096

2026 0.207 0.203 0.200 0.189 0.099 0.097 0.095 0.090

2027 0.189 0.186 0.182 0.173 0.105 0.103 0.101 0.096

2028 0.171 0.167 0.164 0.156 0.100 0.098 0.096 0.091

2029 0.151 0.148 0.145 0.138 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.084

2030 0.130 0.127 0.125 0.118 0.083 0.081 0.080 0.076

2031 0.116 0.113 0.111 0.105 0.073 0.072 0.070 0.067

2032 0.103 0.101 0.099 0.094 0.061 0.060 0.059 0.056

2033 0.092 0.090 0.088 0.084 0.057 0.056 0.055 0.052

2034 0.082 0.080 0.079 0.075 0.049 0.048 0.048 0.045

2035 0.073 0.071 0.070 0.066 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2036 0.065 0.064 0.063 0.059 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2037 0.058 0.057 0.056 0.053 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2038 0.052 0.051 0.050 0.047 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2039 0.046 0.045 0.044 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2040 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037 0.041 0.040 0.039 0.037

2041 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.036 0.040 0.039 0.038 0.036

2042 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.035 0.038 0.038 0.037 0.035

2043 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.034 0.037 0.036 0.036 0.034

2044 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.032 0.036 0.035 0.034 0.032

2045 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.031 0.034 0.034 0.033 0.031

2046 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.030 0.033 0.032 0.032 0.030

2047 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.029 0.032 0.031 0.030 0.029

2048 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.028 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.028

2049 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.026 0.029 0.028 0.028 0.026

2050 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025 0.028 0.027 0.027 0.025

The relevant column for the proposed development should be the second one: the long-run

marginal figure, consumption based, for the domestic sector. The proposed SAP figures are more

appropriate for a footprinting exercise, and are essentially what appears in the sixth column: grid-

average, consumption-based, domestic. Footprinting of a development which already exists (and so,

because it already exists, introduces no change in demand) is quite different from understanding the

impact of new development that introduces marginal changes in demand for electricity: that is the

case for this proposal, hence the relevance of the long-run marginal figures for the carbon intensity

of electricity used.2

Note also that whilst the figures in both columns are expected to fall between 2021 and 2030,

neither figure reaches ‘zero’ (or close to it) by 2030. Even without the details of the calculation being

provided, it is clear that this new development will not be zero carbon by 2030. This is of relevance

in respect of the One City Climate Strategy, to which the Energy and Sustainability Assessment

makes no reference. The One City Climate Strategy has two goals for ‘Buildings’, the first of which is:

2030 goal: All buildings in the city will be carbon neutral and use resources efficiently,

ensuring everyone can enjoy affordable warmth in winter and avoid overheating in summer.

The related objectives include the following (by 2030):

New buildings are carbon neutral and climate resilient (aligning heat provision to the city’s

heat decarbonisation programme).

There is no possibility of this new development meeting this objective as it has been proposed.

In terms of electricity generation, the One City Climate Strategy states:

Bristol will need to play its role locally in enabling this national grid decarbonisation. The

evidence demonstrates that the city can not generate within its boundaries enough zero

carbon electricity to meet its own electricity demand. So it will rely on new renewable

generation being installed elsewhere. But it can generate more ‘in area’ by realising

significantly more of the potential for rooftop solar PV on residential and non-residential

buildings across the city (estimated at 500MW at viable rates of return – only 28MW of

which has been realised to date).

The point here is that the performance of this development would have been significantly enhanced,

in terms of climate credentials, by inclusion of solar PV, and this is what would have been done to

bring the development into line with the One City Climate Strategy.

Furthermore, the provision of on-site PV could have rendered affordable homes ‘even more

affordable’ by contributing to meeting the costs of electricity consumption.

Given, therefore:

1. The obvious benefits of zero carbon sources of electricity in driving the emissions from the

development down;

2. The fact that the Energy and Sustainability Assessment offers no reasoning that would

indicate that such sources are non-viable;

3. The fact that the CCSPN state that:

In respect of each of these issues, Sustainability Statements should set out what possible

measures have been explored, which measures have been adopted and integrated into

2 What BEIS is essentially saying is that by adding new demand, the pace at which the grid is decarbonised is slowed down. This is entirely sensible. What the SAP approach should be doing is to ensure that the carbon factors used reflect the impact of the development on demand. Unless it does so, it is not consistent with the approach used by Government for policy and project appraisal, as indicated by Guidance prepared by BEIS, and used to inform assessments using the well-respected Green Book appraisal proposed by HM Treasury.

the design and, where relevant, why it was not feasible to incorporate certain measures

into the proposed development.

4. And that the CCSPN also states that:

4. A failure to convincingly address each of these issues will result in a refusal of planning

permission.

then the application for planning permission must be refused. The Energy and Sustainability

Assessment does not do what the CCSPN requires it do. There is no meaningful test of viability which

has been ‘failed’ by the obvious opportunity for the provision of solar PV.

Instead of achieving 33% reduction in residual greenhouse gas emissions (and 37% reduction against

a Building Regs compliant development – note, this figure is wrongly labelled in the Energy and

Sustainability Assessment), this ought to have been a zero carbon development, are at least very

close to it, if only it had followed what the CCSPN requires it to do.

We note that the Planning Statement (7.51) reads:

The applicant wholeheartedly supports Bristol City Council’s commitment to becoming

carbon neutral and climate resilient by 2030.

The applicant – and its Trustees - need to be made aware, if they are not already, that this proposal

falls a long way short of demonstrating support for the Council’s commitments, whatever Barton

Willmore may claim. If the applicant really did wholeheartedly support the commitment to carbon

neutrality, then this application would be aligned with that objective: it is not.

Trees

Trees are part of the green infrastructure that sites should, in accordance with various plan policies,

integrate into their proposals. This proposal does the opposite: it seeks permission to remove 16

trees, one of which is described as Category U. The Arboricultural Report notes:

Trees Identified for Retention and Removal.

It is proposed to remove fifteen trees, detailed below, to facilitate the proposed

development. T16 will be removed in accordance with good arboricultural practice.

Cat A Cat B Cat C Cat U

T02 T01, T04, T08, T09, T10, T15, T17, T18, T19

T03, T11, T13, T14, T22

T16

1 9 5 1

The Table below para 5.7 in the Planning Statement includes the following:

There are a number of good quality mature trees on the site that are to be retained, as they

are both ecologically important, and add to the distinctive character of the area.

Any smaller trees that are required to be replaced within the car park will be better

integrated into the development’s design layout in line with Bristol City Council’s Tree

Replacement Standard and enhance the ecological value of the site.

The inclusion of green roofs and living walls further support wildlife, and integrate the tree

planting with other spaces for wildlife to nest, forage and shelter.

The wording only obliquely references the loss of trees at the site. The tree planting referred to

relates to trees being replaced, this number being fewer than the number for which permission to

remove has been sought. This statement masks the fact that more trees will be lost than will be

replaced. The suggestion in the above paragraph that trees ‘required to be replaced’ are ‘smaller’ is

less relevant than what is actually being lost. The proposal for new trees does not actually align with

the Tree Replacement Standard.

The Table from the Arboricultural Report has been reproduced below, highlighting the trees

surveyed, and indicating (through the shaded polygons) the trees which the Arboricultural Report

seeks permission to remove.

There is no exploration of why they necessarily need permanent removal: the report moves easily

into a straightforward proposal for removal. Para 1.3 of the report reads:

1.3 Specifically, this report and the accompanying information are supplied to:

• Identify the constraints that trees on and adjacent to the site present to the development

of the site, to inform the site design process.

But the report does not show evidence of this. The figures in the Appendices show that the nature of

the proposed development was already established at the time the report was being prepared. The

aim appears not to have been to identify constraints, and as a result, to inform site design: rather,

the report seems to have been prepared with the express purpose of indicating what trees should be

removed to facilitate an already well-developed proposal. The trees have not informed the fate of

the development: rather, the development appears to have informed the fate of the trees, or at

least, that is what the Report leads us to infer. We are all left wondering whether the removal of

trees could have been reduced, or rendered unnecessary, through a better design process where the

Arboricultural Report actually did inform the site design. Why, for example, do trees T01 and T02

and T13 and T14 have to go? Why could the development not have been designed to accommodate

them given they could easily have been at the perimeter of the development, alternatively

conceived? There is not logic or justification: the trees are condemned because the Report says they

need to be removed to accommodate this proposal. That cannot be considered an adequate way to

proceed, and is inconsistent with BCS9 (see below).

Notwithstanding the above, in the Arboricultural Report, there is recognition of the fact that

mitigation would be required in the event of removal:

6.4.1 Mitigation In accordance with Bristol City Council Tree Replacement Scheme (BTRS) the

removal of the afore mentioned trees will require either replacement tree planting on site or

a monetary contribution for replacement tree planting elsewhere in the area. The number of

replacement trees, or amount of the monetary contribution, is calculated on the stem

diameter of trees proposed for removal.

6.4.2 Calculations of the obligations for the removal of the trees are listed below. The

obligation can be fulfilled with a mixture of replacement trees and monetary contributions if

desired. In accordance with Bristol City Councils Tree Replacement Scheme the removal of

the aforementioned trees will require the planting of 28 x replacement trees or a monetary

contribution of £21,420.00

The implied assumption is that monetary contributions would be made at the rate for a tree in open

ground with no tree pit required. These, though, may be trees lost to the locality, and certainly, the

would-be residents.

In the Planning Statement, no mention to monetary contributions is made. At para 7.68, it notes:

7.68 Eight of the existing trees are to be retained, with replacement tree planting proposed

to mitigate against the loss of the trees to be removed.

The same statement appears in the Design and Access Statement. There is no mention of monetary

contributions, and no reference to off-site planting.

According to the Arboricultural Report, the removal of the trees as proposed would require 28 new

trees. Reviewing the Proposed Site Layout, I could count 10 proposed trees (not 28). There seem to

be 18 trees which have ‘gone missing’.

The Planning Statement from Barton Wilmore on behalf of its client reads as follows regarding their

client:

As a wildlife and conservation charity, it also wants to give a helping hand to local wildlife.

Paragraph 2.1 of the Planning Statement notes:

The Society’s mission is saving wildlife together and their vision is for wildlife to be a part of

everyone’s lives and for people to want to, and be enabled to, protect wildlife now and for

the future.

This application does nothing to reflect that intention. The charity has five objectives as part of its

‘saving wildlife together’ strategy, and one of them is to engage with its public; another is to create

conservationists; and another is to sustain the environment. None of that is evident in this

application, made on its behalf. If the Bristol Zoological Society is comfortable taking responsibility

for a net reduction in trees on or around the site, it should acknowledge this. In reality, though, the

application as it stands is either ‘economical with the truth’, and missing 18 trees.3

In the Planning Statement, as the authors run through relevant policies, they note:

Core Strategy Policy BCS9 sets out that green infrastructure assets include open spaces,

gardens, allotments street trees and planting. Development should incorporate new and/or

enhanced green infrastructure of an appropriate type, standard and size. Where on-site

provision of green infrastructure is not possible, contributions will be sought to make

appropriate provision for green infrastructure off site.

Going back to the previous point regarding the Arboricultural Report, and the fact that it constitutes

an ex post proposal (it cannot be termed ‘a justification’) for removing trees to facilitate a pre-

designed development, the proposal clearly fails to implement this policy. There is no reason at all

why an innovative design could not have incorporated new and / or enhanced green infrastructure.

There was nothing compelling the proposed density of dwellings. There was nothing compelling the

design to be exactly as it is proposed. The proposal constitutes a failure to implement BCS9, and a

failure in design.

It is difficult to square the stated mission of the applicant with the nature of this application. The

application to remove 15 + 1 trees and to propose a number of replacements which will be

inadequate from the perspective of the development is unfortunate. It has also been hidden from

view. The Arboricultural Report gives options, but was clearly not appraised of the form of

development being proposed (had it been so, it would have been able to comment on the loss of

trees).

Noise

The Noise Assessment is inadequate. It fails to consider, in any meaningful sense, the contribution

that a new development will bring to the existing area. In this respect, it is non-compliant with Policy

DM35 which clearly requires Mitigation to consider ‘measures to reduce or contain generated noise’.

It is rather bewildering that the new dwellings are not considered, effectively, to be the source of

any new noise, not least at night, when the balconies, which are described as a feature of the

development, might be used by residents generating music and noise in their own right. This is in

addition to any additional night-time transport noise which the development would bring to existing

residents.

In respect of the effect of noise on the development itself, it is worth quoting the text which

supports DM35 (which is due to be retained in a revised plan) in the SADMP:

3 As per my footnote 1, this is another example where the design trumps the sustainability concerns rather than being undertaken in such a way that the sustainability concerns are integrated into the site. It is unfortunate that neither the Arboricultural report nor the ecological report were required to advise on the nature / form / siting of the 28 replacement trees (though now completely comprehensible since it seems it was never intended to replace them). It does raise, then, the question as to whether the trees and their location are appropriate – the most information we have comes from the Ecological Report which states: ‘Elsewhere planting on the site will include species that are of value for wildlife, including priority species. These will include berry-bearing trees and shrubs; trees that are either native or are closely related to native species (such as ornamental Malus and Pyrus spp, which support most of the insects supported by native species; and nectar-rich herbaceous plants that are of value to pollinating insects such as bumblebees.’ There is not much by way of definitive strategy, other than reducing the number of trees.

2.35.4 Noise-sensitive development, including houses, hospitals and schools, should not

generally be located next to existing sources of significant environmental noise. Depending

on the level of environmental noise, the impact can in some cases be satisfactorily mitigated,

allowing the noise-sensitive development to proceed on the affected site. However, the

design of mitigation measures should have regard to the need to provide a satisfactory

environment for future occupiers and take account of other material planning considerations

such as urban design.

2.35.5 Applications for residential development in areas of significant existing environmental

and neighbourhood noise will not usually be permitted unless a robust scheme of mitigation

is put forward and the benefits of the proposal in terms of regeneration are considered to

outweigh the impacts on the amenity of future occupiers, for instance where the proposed

development would support investment in centres. In general, the following values will be

sought for residential development:

i. Daytime (07.00 - 23.00) 35 dB LAeq 16 hours in all rooms and 50 dB in outdoor living areas.

ii. Nightime (23.00 - 07.00) 30 dB LAeq 8 hours and LAmax less than 45 dB in bedrooms

The Noise Assessment states:

the night-time noise levels at College Road Façades will be 51 dB LAeq(free-field). Any

standard modern construction using double glazed windows and trickle vents is likely to

provide a composite sound reduction index of at least 25 dB Dw. Therefore, the recommend

internal noise limits from BS8233:2014 and BCC Policy DM35 (30 dB LAeq) will be achieved.

When windows are open to cool an overheating room, noise levels may be up to 6dB above

the recommended criterion.

The Assessment goes on to say:

This [i.e. a 6dB exceedance of the 30dB noise limit] is slightly above the level considered to

represent “reasonable” conditions according to BS8233:2014 but it is not a significant

exceedance and sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected. With reference to the AVO

Guide, night-time noise levels are of low significance and further assessment of the

overheating condition is not required

This point, regarding the exceedance ‘not being significant’, is the opinion of Hydrock, the authors of

the Assessment. The AVO Guide (not fully referenced in the Assessment – this is the Acoustics

Ventilation And Overheating: Residential Design Guide of January 2020, produced by ANC and the

Institute of Acoustics) may be being misrepresented. The AVO Guide does not constitute official

government advice.

Extracts from the Noise Assessment’s own Appendix confirm the fact that such an exceedance is not

of ‘low significance’:

Extract 1: Regarding BS 8233:2014 -Guidance on sound insulation and noise reduction for

buildings

Whilst BS 8233:2014 recognises that a guideline value may be set in terms of SEL or

LAFmax in bedrooms during the night-time to minimise the risk from regular

individual noise events that can affect sleep quality, a specific criterion is not

stipulated. Therefore, guidance on maximum night-time noise levels from World

Health Organisation (WHO) 1999: Guidelines for Community Noise are often used in

the UK, including within ProPG.

British Standard 4142:2014+A1:2019

a) Typically, the greater this difference, the greater the magnitude of the impact.

b) A difference of around +10 dB or more is likely to be an indication of a significant

adverse impact, depending on the context.

c) A difference of around +5 dB is likely to be an indication of an adverse impact,

depending on the context.

Contrary to the consultants’ views, therefore, this suggests a difference of 6dB may be considered a

significant exceedance.

Extract 2: World Health Organisation (WHO) Guidelines on Community Noise

When noise is continuous, the equivalent sound pressure level should not exceed 30 dB(A)

indoors, if negative effects on sleep are to be avoided. For noise with a large proportion of

low-frequency sound a still lower guideline value is recommended.

The consultants’ view that ‘sleep is unlikely to be significantly affected’ by a noise level of 36dB

(presumably, 51dB from traffic with 15dB attenuation from an open window) is flatly contradicted

by WHO Guidelines, which the authors themselves have helpfully cited.

It is worth cross-referencing the Energy and Sustainability Assessment’s ‘Overheating Analysis’. This

considers the susceptibility of the dwellings to overheating. It considers both CIBSE TM52 and TM59

assessments. My own understanding of these is that these assessments, of which only TM59 is

specifically for residential dwellings, deliver results which are dependent, in part, on the

assumptions made regarding ventilation strategies. Hence, whilst the Overheating Analysis delivers a

‘pass’ according to the consultants, it is unclear to what extent it does so contingent only upon

ventilation strategies implying that windows are kept open. Given the noise assessment, this is

especially true for the second criterion in TM59. In this respect, the Energy and Sustainability

Assessment states (Sn 7.2 fourth bullet):

An openable window strategy has been developed to reduce the risk of overheating in

summer in line with CIBSE TM59 methodology requirements

The interplay between these factors – the susceptibility to overheating and the exposure to noise,

especially at night-time, and given also that no account has been taken of the noise generated by the

development itself – deserves much closer consideration than has been given.

The plan for renewable energy generation – central to achieving the required reduction in CO2

emissions from the proposed development to comply with the requirements of the outdated

planning policy – is centred on the deployment of air-source heat pumps (ASHPs). The Energy and

Sustainability Assessment indicates that these will be housed as follows:

ASHP units would need to sit in either an acoustically treated external plant enclosure or

within a well-ventilated internal plantroom. The current architectural design allows for an

internal ground floor plant room in Block B with louvred wall to allow for suitable airflow.

A review of the floorplan for Block B indicates a plan for 6 Mitsubishi CAHV units (it is not completely

clear whether the room will enable their proper functioning – some of the dimensions look suspect

given the face to face / side by side nature of the layout). It is a peculiar design choice that these will

sit directly under the bedrooms of Flat 53 and Flat 58, and beside the bedroom in Flat 48. Perhaps

other considerations have trumped the issue of exposure of residents in the development to the

ASHPs: the Planning Noise Assessment considers the noise from ASHPs largely in respect of their

impact on nearby existing residential properties. Laudable as this is as a principle, it overlooks the

need to ensure that the development is also tolerable to those who will be living there in future. It is

difficult to imagine circumstances where the bedroom windows of the Flats mentioned would be

exposed to noise levels below those that British Standards and the WHO consider likely to be

injurious to sleep, and thence, to the health of residents.

There are, surely, better configurations of this proposal which would allow improved mitigation of

noise. There is no noise mitigation between the main source of noise – the road – and the

development itself. There is, in short, no mitigation other than the fabric of the building. The density

of development leads to a citing of the ASHPs which leads to a high likelihood of sleep disturbance in

the bedrooms of some of the flats. Not everyone can sleep with double-glazed windows closed

(even ones with trickle vents) at night. That is before one even considers the fact that the proposed

development might, itself, be a source of night-time noise, whether from residents on the many

balconies or from the additional night-time transport that the suite will undoubtedly generate.

Policy DM35 clearly states:

Development will not be permitted if mitigation cannot be provided to an appropriate

standard with an acceptable design, particularly in proximity to sensitive existing uses or

sites

On the above basis, and given the requirements of DM35, and given also the very likely impact on

sleep – casually and erroneously dismissed by the consultants - of having a window open at night at

the proposed properties, the development should not be permitted.

Is the Site ‘brownfield’?

The Planning Statement accompanying the application asserts (para 1.2):

The site is brownfield as it currently is a car park and provides ancillary storage. The site is

within the Clifton and Hotwells Conservation Area.

The site does not appear on the City Council’s Brownfield Land register. It may also be a moot point

that the car park qualifies as ‘previously developed land’ given the definition in the NPPF of

‘previously developed land’ (commonly referred to as ‘brownfield’). The NPPF definition is:

Previously developed land: Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure,

including the curtilage of the developed land (although it should not be assumed that the

whole of the curtilage should be developed) and any associated fixed surface infrastructure.

This excludes: land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that

has been developed for minerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where

provision for restoration has been made through development control procedures; land in

built-up areas such as private residential gardens, parks, recreation grounds and allotments;

and land that was previously-developed but where the remains of the permanent structure

or fixed surface structure have blended into the landscape in the process of time.

Although a car park could be considered to be ‘previously developed land’, it might not be so in all

cases: the West Car Park is essentially an area of hard-standing with minor ancillary structures. It

could be considered that the proposal for development represents the type of development – albeit

on a larger scale – that the exclusions in the NPPF were designed to prevent. This is especially

relevant given the planning history of the site – the proposed development is taking place on land

which was, in 2000, partly used for greenhouses. This is hardly land that has been subject to major

development prior to this application.

In any event, even if the site is ‘brownfield’, this is clearly not a reason to give the go-ahead for the

development.

Need for the development

The Planning Statement also states (Table under para 5.7):

The Society is proposing the redevelopment of the car park to deliver much needed housing

on a brownfield site in a central location in line with principles of the NPPF and local planning

policy. The proposed use will deliver more social and economic benefits than the current use

of the site as a car park.

The suggested need for the housing is unclear, and the appropriate metric regarding costs and

benefits would be to appraise reasonable counterfactuals, not simply the one that maximises private

gain.

Furthermore, by the Policies of the Core Strategy , by which the proposal suggests it should be

adjudged, the need is far from clear. BC5 stated:

The Core Strategy aims to deliver new homes within the built up area to contribute towards

accommodating a growing number of people and households in the city. Provision of new

homes will be in accordance with the spatial strategy for Bristol set out in this Core Strategy

and it is envisaged that 30,600 new homes will be provided in Bristol between 2006 and

2026. Additional provision which accords with the spatial strategy may be appropriate within

the plan period.

The minimum target will be 26,400 homes between 2006 and 2026. The appropriate level of

new homes will be reviewed within 5 years of the adoption of the Core Strategy.

The 2020 Bristol Residential Development Survey 2020 (The RDS) noted (see Table 1 in the RDS –

also, para 1.10):

Since 2006, 24,669 dwellings have been complete

This is the net figure.

The RDS also noted (para 1.3) that:

At 31st March 2020 there are 2,938 dwellings under construction, 8,902 with planning

permission not started and a further 910 dwellings on sites with planning permission subject

to the signing of a Section 106 agreement, totalling 12,750 – see Table 2.

Even if one takes into account only those dwellings under construction, then the target in BC5 is

exceeded. Even the most conservative estimate of the rate at which sites with planning consent will

lead on to construction implies that the level of housing need which has been identified within the

existing plan will be far exceeded without any new planning consents. That does not, in itself,

indicate that no additional housing development should be granted: it does, however, place the

above comments in context. Against the policies in the Core Strategy, this cannot be considered

‘much needed housing’. The need was identified in the Core Strategy and has been exceeded.

Housing density

Responding to the view that the density of housing proposed in the development was too high, the

Planning Statement (Table below para 5.7) states:

As a charity the Trustees are legally required to obtain maximum value from the charity’s

assets to reinvest in its charitable objectives.

‘Value’ has never been synonymous with ‘price’: the whole basis of Government’s ‘Best Value’

regime for local government was partly designed to ensure that contracts would not be awarded

purely on price. The best value outcome might not be the one that generates the highest sale price

for the land for which the planning application has been submitted.

Nonetheless, this is somewhat different to the wording in the Charities Commission Guidance on the

matter, at para 7.6: 4

Most charities can buy, sell or lease land when they need to. When selling or leasing land,

trustees must try to get the best deal for the charity (unless they are making the disposal to

further the charity’s purposes).

One can argue the toss about the term ‘best deal’, but it might not be the same as ‘maximum value,

let alone, ‘highest price’. Yet on the matter of whether the disposal is being made to further the

charity’s purposes, the Bristol Zoo website includes the following:

To safeguard the future of Bristol Zoological Society, we are relocating Bristol Zoo to the Wild

Place Project site to create a world-class zoo for Bristol and the West of England.

As part of the first phase of this new strategy, an application for planning permission has

been submitted for residential development of Bristol Zoo Garden’s West Car Park on College

Road. The sale of the West Car Park will provide a vital contribution to the funds required to

deliver the first phase of the new Bristol Zoo.

It would be difficult to argue against the view that these words indicate that the disposal is being

made to further the charity’s purposes (in which case, whatever the meaning of ‘best deal’, the

requirement might not even apply

What is of concern, however, is how the Trustees’ responsibilities are invoked in part as an

explanation for the density of proposed development (in the Table in the Planning Statement that

follows Para 5.7). On density of dwellings, the Planning Statement is selective in citing draft policies.

For example, the Planning Statement reads:

In the emerging Draft Policies and Development Allocations document the site is located

within the inner urban (more intensive) zone, where the minimum density is 120 dph (Policy

UL2 Urban Densities). Similarly, the adopted Urban Living SPD (2019) identifies a density

within urban settings of 120 dph.